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Pangolin Gumbo

Burning 23.98Fps Material To (Uk) Dvd

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Hi folks,

I have an item that is 1280x720 but 23.98 fps. I wish to burn it to DVD but I'm unsure whether to select 25fps (PAL) or 29.97 (NTSC) in Toast Video Preferences. I will be playing back the resultant DVD on a UK DVD player/TV. I'd like to know from someone more knowledgable than me which is the preferable format to burn to? I should mention in passing that NTSC DVDs are playable in all UK DVD players - the signal is transcoded, what I'm concerned most about is avoiding a jerky playback picture. For instance, should I change the frame-rate, prior to mastering to DVD, using a program like Handbrake? Any hints or tips on this gratefully received!

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23.976 fps is the framerate normally associated with NTSC progressive. (29.97 fps is NTSC interlaced.)

While 23.976 fps is a perfectly valid framerate for DVD, Toast will use either 29.97 fps (NTSC) or 25 fps (PAL), when converting the video. Unfortunate, but those are the breaks when using this product.

 

The only way to have Toast preserve the 23.976 fps framerate, is when you feed Toast a DVD compliant MPEG-2 file (with soft 3:2 pulldown marker), in order to avoid any conversion by Toast. You could convert your file with another tool that exports to DVD specification, e.g. iFFmpeg.

 

If you let Toast convert the framerate, you should prefer 29.97 over 25 fps, as the first will be smoother: the 3:2 pulldown is applied to the first for maximum smoothness, while the latter has no scheme that is that much optimised. A modern tv set may use its own trickery to make the motion more smooth, but those effects may differ from tv set to tv set. And those would work best on the original framerate, not a converted framerate.

 

Toast's framerate conversion isn't particularly bad compared to others, but something is lost that could have been preserved.

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23.976 fps is the framerate normally associated with NTSC progressive. (29.97 fps is NTSC interlaced.)

While 23.976 fps is a perfectly valid framerate for DVD, Toast will use either 29.97 fps (NTSC) or 25 fps (PAL), when converting the video. Unfortunate, but those are the breaks when using this product.

 

The only way to have Toast preserve the 23.976 fps framerate, is when you feed Toast a DVD compliant MPEG-2 file (with soft 3:2 pulldown marker), in order to avoid any conversion by Toast. You could convert your file with another tool that exports to DVD specification, e.g. iFFmpeg.

 

If you let Toast convert the framerate, you should prefer 29.97 over 25 fps, as the first will be smoother: the 3:2 pulldown is applied to the first for maximum smoothness, while the latter has no scheme that is that much optimised. A modern tv set may use its own trickery to make the motion more smooth, but those effects may differ from tv set to tv set. And those would work best on the original framerate, not a converted framerate.

 

Toast's framerate conversion isn't particularly bad compared to others, but something is lost that could have been preserved.

 

Thanks for the interesting suggestions. OK, so were I to take the 23.976 fps file and run it thru iFFmpeg, resulting in an MPEG-2 file, how then would I record it to DVD in Toast?

Edited by Pangolin Gumbo

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I tested (with Apple's software DVD Player) and I believe the pulldown will be done by Toast on authoring stage, so you don't need to include that in your preparation. :) That wasn't the case a few versions earlier.

 

Pass on the DVD-compliant MPEG-2 file on to Toast. Set the details as you normally would, except for:

In Options, Customise, Encoding tab, set Reencoding to Never, set Field Dominance to Progressive.

If Toast thinks the input file is within specs, then Toast should only re-multiplex the video stream and audio stream, not re-encode. This should go fast, almost like copying a file.

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