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How to rip music from a movie DVD


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#1 jlove

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 01:53 PM

Well, I thought this would be easy (Ha!). I bought a DVD concert movie and thought it would be nice to rip the tracks to MP3 so I could listen to the tracks in my car. So far I've tried Music Disk Creator, Convert CDs, and Media Import, but nothing seems to work. I suspect I can play the DVD and capture the sound off the sound card, but that strikes me as a sure bet to be of low quality.

According to the book I bought a while back (Easy Media Creator 8 by Lisa Dayley)--and yes, I know it is v8, but most of the content seems to apply to v9--this should be done via Media Import. So I run that program, and I see the promising title that this will allow me to "import audio from CDs and DVDs". Then I press the "audio" button. Next, I am supposed to select a device or source and the book tells me that I should select my DVD drive, which I do. Media Import then says: "Selected location does not contain content for this project type".

So I thought, maybe the problem is that I need to select "video" rather than "audio" since this is a DVD with a Video_TS folder. But that yields the same message ("Selected location does not contain content for this project type").

So two questions--is what I am trying to do feasible, and if so how do I do it?

Thanks in advance for any assistance.

-- Jack Love

#2 cdanteek

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 02:00 PM

No, if the DVD a bought commercial DVD. it is copy protected!

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1.Click here   Beginners Guide - Blank DVD Media Type Definitions & What A Firmware Upgrade Is for Your Burner.
2.Click here Firmware HQ - site  dedicated to providing you with the latest firmware releases for your optical disc drives.  
3.Click here CD-DVD Speed
4.Click here CD-DVD Speed - A user guide
5.Click here Enabling/Checking DMA in Windows Vista, XP, 2000, Me, 9x.
6.Click hereYou can no longer access the CD drive or the DVD drive.
7.Click here Drive Not Recognized By Roxio, PX Engine 3_00_58a. Old Version<-> EMC 7.5 Up  PX Engine 4.18.16a. Update .Click here  PX Engine Fix, Click here The Latest 4.10.28a Click here
8.Click here  How to uninstall IE 7 and WMP 11.
9.Click here ImgBurn Current version: v2.5.8.0 (3,389 KB)  CD / DVD / HD DVD / Blu-ray burning application
10.Click here InfoTool  (Drive, Disk, Configuration, Software, Hardware, DMA settings, etc.).
11.Click here   Complete Uninstall of Creator 2011 & Creator 2012
12.Click here Complete Uninstall of Creator 2009 and 2010 (Windows Vista and 7)
13.Click here Complete Uninstall of Creator 2009 and 2010 (Windows XP)
14.Click here Complete Uninstall of Easy Media Creator 9 & 10 on Windows Vista  
15.Click here Complete Uninstall of Easy Media Creator 7.5,  8, 9, & 10 on Windows XP
16. Click here WinZip Data Compression Utility <>  Click here WinRAR Data Compression Utility   Click here 7-Zip Data Compression Utility
17. Click here Finding Your Computer Specs And Roxio Software Version Number.

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#3 grandpabruce

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 02:02 PM

QUOTE (jlove @ Oct 19 2007, 04:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Well, I thought this would be easy (Ha!). I bought a DVD concert movie and thought it would be nice to rip the tracks to MP3 so I could listen to the tracks in my car. So far I've tried Music Disk Creator, Convert CDs, and Media Import, but nothing seems to work. I suspect I can play the DVD and capture the sound off the sound card, but that strikes me as a sure bet to be of low quality.

According to the book I bought a while back (Easy Media Creator 8 by Lisa Dayley)--and yes, I know it is v8, but most of the content seems to apply to v9--this should be done via Media Import. So I run that program, and I see the promising title that this will allow me to "import audio from CDs and DVDs". Then I press the "audio" button. Next, I am supposed to select a device or source and the book tells me that I should select my DVD drive, which I do. Media Import then says: "Selected location does not contain content for this project type".

So I thought, maybe the problem is that I need to select "video" rather than "audio" since this is a DVD with a Video_TS folder. But that yields the same message ("Selected location does not contain content for this project type").

So two questions--is what I am trying to do feasible, and if so how do I do it?

Thanks in advance for any assistance.

-- Jack Love


What you are trying to do is illegal, and that is why none of the programs in the software suite will let you do it.
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#4 cdanteek

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 02:09 PM

QUOTE
What you are trying to do is illegal,


Illegal most places but I don't know where you live! Try cdfreaks.com based in the Netherlands, must not be illegal there.

cd
cd
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My Computer Specs click show.
Spoiler

1.Click here   Beginners Guide - Blank DVD Media Type Definitions & What A Firmware Upgrade Is for Your Burner.
2.Click here Firmware HQ - site  dedicated to providing you with the latest firmware releases for your optical disc drives.  
3.Click here CD-DVD Speed
4.Click here CD-DVD Speed - A user guide
5.Click here Enabling/Checking DMA in Windows Vista, XP, 2000, Me, 9x.
6.Click hereYou can no longer access the CD drive or the DVD drive.
7.Click here Drive Not Recognized By Roxio, PX Engine 3_00_58a. Old Version<-> EMC 7.5 Up  PX Engine 4.18.16a. Update .Click here  PX Engine Fix, Click here The Latest 4.10.28a Click here
8.Click here  How to uninstall IE 7 and WMP 11.
9.Click here ImgBurn Current version: v2.5.8.0 (3,389 KB)  CD / DVD / HD DVD / Blu-ray burning application
10.Click here InfoTool  (Drive, Disk, Configuration, Software, Hardware, DMA settings, etc.).
11.Click here   Complete Uninstall of Creator 2011 & Creator 2012
12.Click here Complete Uninstall of Creator 2009 and 2010 (Windows Vista and 7)
13.Click here Complete Uninstall of Creator 2009 and 2010 (Windows XP)
14.Click here Complete Uninstall of Easy Media Creator 9 & 10 on Windows Vista  
15.Click here Complete Uninstall of Easy Media Creator 7.5,  8, 9, & 10 on Windows XP
16. Click here WinZip Data Compression Utility <>  Click here WinRAR Data Compression Utility   Click here 7-Zip Data Compression Utility
17. Click here Finding Your Computer Specs And Roxio Software Version Number.

E-mail spambots harvest e-mail addresses from material found on the Internet in order to build mailing lists for sending unsolicited e-mail, also known as spam. Such spambots are web crawlers that can gather e-mail addresses from Web sites, newsgroups, special-interest group (SIG) postings, and chat-room conversations. .

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#5 gi7omy

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 02:16 PM

QUOTE (cdanteek @ Oct 19 2007, 11:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Illegal most places but I don't know where you live! Try cdfreaks.com based in the Netherlands, must not be illegal there.

cd


The Netherlands is part of the EU and it is illegal there too.
If it ain't broke, fiddle with it until it breaks, then fiddle with it until you get it fixed

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#6 jlove

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 04:52 PM

Why in the world would this be any more illegal than if I had purchased a Music CD and done exactly the same thing? One purchases a CD by any major artist at any retail outlet, puts it in the computer and Roxio happily converts it to MP3 so it can be enjoyed on a portable music player, car stereo, etc. I'm trying to do exactly the same thing with a concert video--rip the music portion to MP3 for use by myself, the licensee of the material in exactly the same way.

By the way, the DVD is not copy protected.

-- Jack

#7 cdanteek

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 04:56 PM

What is the title of the DVD? If it is not copy protected this should work..

http://forums.support.roxio.com/index.php?showtopic=20393

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cd
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My Computer Specs click show.
Spoiler

1.Click here   Beginners Guide - Blank DVD Media Type Definitions & What A Firmware Upgrade Is for Your Burner.
2.Click here Firmware HQ - site  dedicated to providing you with the latest firmware releases for your optical disc drives.  
3.Click here CD-DVD Speed
4.Click here CD-DVD Speed - A user guide
5.Click here Enabling/Checking DMA in Windows Vista, XP, 2000, Me, 9x.
6.Click hereYou can no longer access the CD drive or the DVD drive.
7.Click here Drive Not Recognized By Roxio, PX Engine 3_00_58a. Old Version<-> EMC 7.5 Up  PX Engine 4.18.16a. Update .Click here  PX Engine Fix, Click here The Latest 4.10.28a Click here
8.Click here  How to uninstall IE 7 and WMP 11.
9.Click here ImgBurn Current version: v2.5.8.0 (3,389 KB)  CD / DVD / HD DVD / Blu-ray burning application
10.Click here InfoTool  (Drive, Disk, Configuration, Software, Hardware, DMA settings, etc.).
11.Click here   Complete Uninstall of Creator 2011 & Creator 2012
12.Click here Complete Uninstall of Creator 2009 and 2010 (Windows Vista and 7)
13.Click here Complete Uninstall of Creator 2009 and 2010 (Windows XP)
14.Click here Complete Uninstall of Easy Media Creator 9 & 10 on Windows Vista  
15.Click here Complete Uninstall of Easy Media Creator 7.5,  8, 9, & 10 on Windows XP
16. Click here WinZip Data Compression Utility <>  Click here WinRAR Data Compression Utility   Click here 7-Zip Data Compression Utility
17. Click here Finding Your Computer Specs And Roxio Software Version Number.

E-mail spambots harvest e-mail addresses from material found on the Internet in order to build mailing lists for sending unsolicited e-mail, also known as spam. Such spambots are web crawlers that can gather e-mail addresses from Web sites, newsgroups, special-interest group (SIG) postings, and chat-room conversations. .

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#8 gi7omy

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 05:01 PM

QUOTE (jlove @ Oct 20 2007, 01:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Why in the world would this be any more illegal than if I had purchased a Music CD and done exactly the same thing?
-- Jack


I have to agree that's a good question - unfortunately, due to intense lobbying by certain media companies, it just IS
If it ain't broke, fiddle with it until it breaks, then fiddle with it until you get it fixed

"Rincewind could scream for mercy in nineteen languages and just scream in another forty-four "

"If computers get too powerful, we can organize them into a committee; that will do them in."

“Computers have enabled people to make more mistakes faster than almost any invention in history, with the possible exception of tequila and hand guns.” — Mitch Ratcliffe


Daithi

Home Brew computer
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1 x 160 GB, 1 x 330 GB, 1 x 400 GB IDE drives
4 x 250 GB SATA 2
LG HL-DT-ST GGW-H20L BD-RE drive
22" Acer P223W monitor


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#9 cdanteek

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 05:05 PM

QUOTE (gi7omy @ Oct 19 2007, 06:01 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have to agree that's a good question - unfortunately, due to intense lobbying by certain media companies, it just IS



Actually coping the DVD is not a crime, busting or breaking the copy protection is the crime.

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cd
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My Computer Specs click show.
Spoiler

1.Click here   Beginners Guide - Blank DVD Media Type Definitions & What A Firmware Upgrade Is for Your Burner.
2.Click here Firmware HQ - site  dedicated to providing you with the latest firmware releases for your optical disc drives.  
3.Click here CD-DVD Speed
4.Click here CD-DVD Speed - A user guide
5.Click here Enabling/Checking DMA in Windows Vista, XP, 2000, Me, 9x.
6.Click hereYou can no longer access the CD drive or the DVD drive.
7.Click here Drive Not Recognized By Roxio, PX Engine 3_00_58a. Old Version<-> EMC 7.5 Up  PX Engine 4.18.16a. Update .Click here  PX Engine Fix, Click here The Latest 4.10.28a Click here
8.Click here  How to uninstall IE 7 and WMP 11.
9.Click here ImgBurn Current version: v2.5.8.0 (3,389 KB)  CD / DVD / HD DVD / Blu-ray burning application
10.Click here InfoTool  (Drive, Disk, Configuration, Software, Hardware, DMA settings, etc.).
11.Click here   Complete Uninstall of Creator 2011 & Creator 2012
12.Click here Complete Uninstall of Creator 2009 and 2010 (Windows Vista and 7)
13.Click here Complete Uninstall of Creator 2009 and 2010 (Windows XP)
14.Click here Complete Uninstall of Easy Media Creator 9 & 10 on Windows Vista  
15.Click here Complete Uninstall of Easy Media Creator 7.5,  8, 9, & 10 on Windows XP
16. Click here WinZip Data Compression Utility <>  Click here WinRAR Data Compression Utility   Click here 7-Zip Data Compression Utility
17. Click here Finding Your Computer Specs And Roxio Software Version Number.

E-mail spambots harvest e-mail addresses from material found on the Internet in order to build mailing lists for sending unsolicited e-mail, also known as spam. Such spambots are web crawlers that can gather e-mail addresses from Web sites, newsgroups, special-interest group (SIG) postings, and chat-room conversations. .

Do not post your email address on any public forum!  

#10 gi7omy

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 05:23 PM

Also selling or distributing it - even if you didn't crack the protection
If it ain't broke, fiddle with it until it breaks, then fiddle with it until you get it fixed

"Rincewind could scream for mercy in nineteen languages and just scream in another forty-four "

"If computers get too powerful, we can organize them into a committee; that will do them in."

“Computers have enabled people to make more mistakes faster than almost any invention in history, with the possible exception of tequila and hand guns.” — Mitch Ratcliffe


Daithi

Home Brew computer
Intel I7 950 on Gigabyte X58A UD3R mobo
12 GB Three Channel DDRAM
Radeon HD4850 512 MB GDR3 graphics
Signalink USB Audio Codec for ham radio connection
1 x 160 GB, 1 x 330 GB, 1 x 400 GB IDE drives
4 x 250 GB SATA 2
LG HL-DT-ST GGW-H20L BD-RE drive
22" Acer P223W monitor


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EMC10 on Windows XP64 SP2
Creator 2011 on Windows 7 Ultimate
ECD6 on Gentoo Linux (running under VMWare)

#11 grandpabruce

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Posted 19 October 2007 - 05:59 PM

QUOTE (jlove @ Oct 19 2007, 07:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Why in the world would this be any more illegal than if I had purchased a Music CD and done exactly the same thing? One purchases a CD by any major artist at any retail outlet, puts it in the computer and Roxio happily converts it to MP3 so it can be enjoyed on a portable music player, car stereo, etc. I'm trying to do exactly the same thing with a concert video--rip the music portion to MP3 for use by myself, the licensee of the material in exactly the same way.

By the way, the DVD is not copy protected.

-- Jack


I can't disagree with you, but Roxio didn't make the rules.  They just have to follow them.

BTW, how do you know the DVD isn't copy protected?
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#12 jlove

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 03:38 PM

OK, a few things I can say here in response to the posts I've seen.

1) I know the disk is not copy protected because I have been backing up for archival purposes my music and video since the early days of vinyl LPs, and I had no trouble making a copy of this disk for my archive. This type of copying has been legal in the US for as long as I can remember (there were some early court cases, but they were resolved in favor of consumers, academics, etc). Since the Roxio software did not object to copying the disk, I can't imagine why it would object to allowing me to rip the music.

2) As an aside, I would probably drastically lower the quantity of music/video I purchase if I could not do this archiving. In the days of vinyl, records would audibly wear out after 5 or 10 plays, so my practice was to copy the music to tape and listen to the tape in order to preserve the quality of the record. When CDs came around, similar strategies were necessary due to "disk rot." Initially, I followed my traditional practice by copying my CDs to VHS HiFi, but eventually I was able to take advantage of high quality MP3, etc. Now, thanks to Roxio, I can make archival copies of my DVDs as well.

3) I purchase my media legally (I'm so old-fashioned that I buy most of it in retail outlets and Amazon.com), and I keep all my music for archival or format shift purposes only. I am an author myself--and I've experienced having my work plagiarized--so I do not condone intellectual property theft at all, ever.

4) One poster did represent US law as I understand it. The "Millennium Digital Rights Act" (that's probably not exactly right, but those who follow this stuff know what I'm taking about) did not render what I and millions of other people do illegal, but it made breaking a copy protection code illegal. There is software widely available via the Internet that will allow anyone to copy just about anything, but that is not important to me for the reasons stated in 3). On the other hand, I choose not to willingly purchase anything which has this sort of copy protection. Every once in a while I find myself with a disk that is copy protected--if I can I return it to the retailer, and if not I just have to live with it. One of the frustrations is that it is often impossible to tell if a disk is copy protected until you try to copy it.

5) One poster provided a solution via a web address--I'll take a look at that and report back whether it worked.

6) I will re-iterate that what I am trying to do is as far as I know not only completely legal, but ethical and moral as well. If I had a DVD player in my car, I could listen to the music on this disk to my heart's content. There shouldn't be any reason why I cannot copy that soundtrack to an MP3 and listen to it that way.

Thanks for all the replies.

#13 jlove

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 03:53 PM

QUOTE (cdanteek @ Oct 19 2007, 04:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
What is the title of the DVD? If it is not copy protected this should work..

http://forums.support.roxio.com/index.php?showtopic=20393

cd


I followed the steps in 20393, but it is not working. I think the problem is that I just don't understand enough about how movies are stored on DVD. When I look at the disk using an O/S tool, I see numerous files with extensions such as .VOB, .BUP, .IFO, but I have no idea how these things are organized or interpreted by the DVD player software.

When Roxio tools such as "media import" load and are pointed at the disk, they usually say that there is a single file that is 3 or 4 gigabytes in length, but the O/S reports the file types above with several of these having lengths in the 1G range.

I probably need to buy a book with the word "idiot" in the title. :-)

Thanks for any additional assistance.

-- Jack Love

Edited by jlove, 20 October 2007 - 03:58 PM.


#14 grandpabruce

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 04:59 PM

QUOTE (jlove @ Oct 20 2007, 06:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I followed the steps in 20393, but it is not working. I think the problem is that I just don't understand enough about how movies are stored on DVD. When I look at the disk using an O/S tool, I see numerous files with extensions such as .VOB, .BUP, .IFO, but I have no idea how these things are organized or interpreted by the DVD player software.

When Roxio tools such as "media import" load and are pointed at the disk, they usually say that there is a single file that is 3 or 4 gigabytes in length, but the O/S reports the file types above with several of these having lengths in the 1G range.

I probably need to buy a book with the word "idiot" in the title. :-)

Thanks for any additional assistance.

-- Jack Love


If the concert isn't copyright protected, then there is no problem with legalities.  If you buy a movie such as "Lord of the Rings", then it is illegal to make a copy of it.

Now, in your case, copy the files from the DVD, to a folder on your hard drive.  Name the folder anything you want.  

Now, this, in my opinion is the easiest way to get what you want, if Music Disc Creator didn't work.  Open VideoWave, click on Add Photo/Video, browse to the Video_TS folder on your hard drive, and bring in all of the .vob files.

Now, click on File/Output As, then in the dropdown box for Video Quality, select mpeg2 for DVD, best quality.  Give it a name, pick where you want it saved on your hard drive, and click on the Create Video.

When it is done creating that video, close VideoWave, then open it again.  Click on View/Media Selector, and browse to that new mpeg file that you made, right click on it, and select Extract Audio.  Save it as a .wav file.

Alternate Method:

Now, another way you may be able to do this, with the files on your hard drive, is to change the file extensions of all of the .vob files to .mpg.

Open VideoWave, click on View, then Media Selector, browse to the folder with the changed file names, right click on one, and see if it will let you extract the audio.  You will have to do this for each of the renamed files, but it may work, and will be faster than the first method I listed in this post.

If you need to edit the sound files, open Sound Editor, and do it there.
Life is good!
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Main System:
ASUS P6T Deluxe V2 LGA 1366 Intel X58 ATX Intel Motherboard; Cooler Master ATCS 840 Case
Intel Core i7 920 Nehalem 2.66GHz 4 x 256KB L2 Cache 8MB L3 Cache LGA 1366 130W Quad-Core Processor
CORSAIR DOMINATOR 3GB (3 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1866
PLEXTOR Black DVD Burner, Model PX-880SA; Pioneer Black 8X BD-R 2X BD-RE 16X DVD+R Burner
EVGA GEFORCE GTX 670 2GB Video Card
Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium Fatal1ty Champion Series Sound Card
Windows XP Pro w/SP3

Backup Computer:
ASUS A8N32-SLI Deluxe
Windows 7 Pro w/SP1

#15 malatekid

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 06:20 PM

QUOTE (jlove @ Oct 20 2007, 07:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I followed the steps in 20393, but it is not working. I think the problem is that I just don't understand enough about how movies are stored on DVD. When I look at the disk using an O/S tool, I see numerous files with extensions such as .VOB, .BUP, .IFO, but I have no idea how these things are organized or interpreted by the DVD player software.

When Roxio tools such as "media import" load and are pointed at the disk, they usually say that there is a single file that is 3 or 4 gigabytes in length, but the O/S reports the file types above with several of these having lengths in the 1G range.

I probably need to buy a book with the word "idiot" in the title. :-)

Thanks for any additional assistance.

-- Jack Love

When you say not working, what exactly is happening? Are you getting error message? Details please.

Edited by malatekid, 20 October 2007 - 06:20 PM.

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#16 jlove

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 06:52 PM

QUOTE (grandpabruce @ Oct 20 2007, 04:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If the concert isn't copyright protected, then there is no problem with legalities.  If you buy a movie such as "Lord of the Rings", then it is illegal to make a copy of it.

Now, in your case, copy the files from the DVD, to a folder on your hard drive.  Name the folder anything you want.  

Now, this, in my opinion is the easiest way to get what you want, if Music Disc Creator didn't work.  Open VideoWave, click on Add Photo/Video, browse to the Video_TS folder on your hard drive, and bring in all of the .vob files.

Now, click on File/Output As, then in the dropdown box for Video Quality, select mpeg2 for DVD, best quality.  Give it a name, pick where you want it saved on your hard drive, and click on the Create Video.

When it is done creating that video, close VideoWave, then open it again.  Click on View/Media Selector, and browse to that new mpeg file that you made, right click on it, and select Extract Audio.  Save it as a .wav file.

Alternate Method:

Now, another way you may be able to do this, with the files on your hard drive, is to change the file extensions of all of the .vob files to .mpg.

Open VideoWave, click on View, then Media Selector, browse to the folder with the changed file names, right click on one, and see if it will let you extract the audio.  You will have to do this for each of the renamed files, but it may work, and will be faster than the first method I listed in this post.

If you need to edit the sound files, open Sound Editor, and do it there.


These are great suggestions, and I will try them as soon as I can find a few minutes to try (time ran out today...). One comment though, on "legalities", because I think this worth discussion in a community which values being able to store, archive and reformat data. As I mentioned earlier today, it is as I understand it, illegal to break the copy protection scheme on a video such as "Lord of the Rings". However, if you can find a  version of "Lord of the Rings" which is not copy protected, it is perfectly legal to back it up and/or use it for personal purposes (such as porting it to an iPod). One aspect of the copy protection law that is not clear is whether someone who did not write the program to break the code can take advantage of someone else's work. In a world where single moms can be penalized over $250k because their kid downloaded some music, it's not worth it for folks like me to test the legal limits.  But I hope someone does, because it strikes me as unfair that the copyright holders would demand that people purchase their products and lose the ability to view them simply because a disk surface gets scratched or otherwise deteriorates. When I plunk down my money for a movie DVD, I'm I feel that I'm buying the right to view the movie, not a 15 cent piece of plastic.

'nuff said. :-)

-- Jack

#17 grandpabruce

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 06:55 PM

QUOTE (jlove @ Oct 20 2007, 09:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
These are great suggestions, and I will try them as soon as I can find a few minutes to try (time ran out today...). One comment though, on "legalities", because I think this worth discussion in a community which values being able to store, archive and reformat data. As I mentioned earlier today, it is as I understand it, illegal to break the copy protection scheme on a video such as "Lord of the Rings". However, if you can find a  version of "Lord of the Rings" which is not copy protected, it is perfectly legal to back it up and/or use it for personal purposes (such as porting it to an iPod). One aspect of the copy protection law that is not clear is whether someone who did not write the program to break the code can take advantage of someone else's work. In a world where single moms can be penalized over $250k because their kid downloaded some music, it's not worth it for folks like me to test the legal limits.  But I hope someone does, because it strikes me as unfair that the copyright holders would demand that people purchase their products and lose the ability to view them simply because a disk surface gets scratched or otherwise deteriorates. When I plunk down my money for a movie DVD, I'm I feel that I'm buying the right to view the movie, not a 15 cent piece of plastic.

'nuff said. :-)

-- Jack


Actually, if you found a version of Lord of the Rings that wasn't copy protected, it is a bootleg copy of the movie, and you can bet your bottom dollar that it is still illegal to have it, or copy it.
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#18 jlove

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 06:56 PM

QUOTE (malatekid @ Oct 20 2007, 06:20 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
When you say not working, what exactly is happening? Are you getting error message? Details please.


I'm getting the same message I reported earlier in the thread "Selected location does not contain content for this project type". In a couple of Roxio modules I'm able to see a file listing of some sort, but the "add" button is grayed out. I got excited once because when I selected the "Video_TS" folder the "add" button was active, but when I pressed it, nothing happened.

It's all pretty frustrating.  sad.gif

#19 cdanteek

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 07:06 PM

QUOTE (jlove @ Oct 20 2007, 07:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
These are great suggestions, and I will try them as soon as I can find a few minutes to try (time ran out today...). One comment though, on "legalities", because I think this worth discussion in a community which values being able to store, archive and reformat data. As I mentioned earlier today, it is as I understand it, illegal to break the copy protection scheme on a video such as "Lord of the Rings". However, if you can find a  version of "Lord of the Rings" which is not copy protected, it is perfectly legal to back it up and/or use it for personal purposes (such as porting it to an iPod). One aspect of the copy protection law that is not clear is whether someone who did not write the program to break the code can take advantage of someone else's work. In a world where single moms can be penalized over $250k because their kid downloaded some music, it's not worth it for folks like me to test the legal limits.  But I hope someone does, because it strikes me as unfair that the copyright holders would demand that people purchase their products and lose the ability to view them simply because a disk surface gets scratched or otherwise deteriorates. When I plunk down my money for a movie DVD, I'm I feel that I'm buying the right to view the movie, not a 15 cent piece of plastic.

'nuff said. :-)

-- Jack



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

DVD Jon

Jon Lech Johansen


Jon Lech Johansen (born November 18, 1983 in Harstad, Norway), also known as DVD Jon, is a Norwegian (his father is Norwegian and mother is Polish) who is famous for his work on reverse engineering data formats. He is most famous for his involvement in the release of the DeCSS software, which decodes the content-scrambling system used for DVD licensing enforcement. Jon is a self-trained software engineer, who quit high school at the first year to spend more time with the DeCSS case. He moved to the United States and worked as a software engineer in October 2005 until November 2006, and has now moved back to Norway.

Johansen is featured in the documentary film info wars.

[edit] The DeCSS prosecution
After Johansen released DeCSS, he was prosecuted in Norway for computer hacking in 2002.

The prosecution was conducted by Økokrim, a Norwegian crime unit investigating and prosecuting economic crime, after a complaint by the US DVD Copy Control Association (DVD-CCA) and the Motion Picture Association (MPA). Johansen has denied writing the decryption code in DeCSS, saying that this part of the project originated from someone in Germany. His defense was assisted by the Electronic Frontier Foundation. The trial opened in the Oslo district court (Oslo tingrett) on December 9, 2002 with Johansen pleading not guilty to charges that had a maximum penalty of two years in prison or large fines. The defense argued that no illegal access was obtained to anyone else's information, since Johansen owned the DVDs himself. They also argued that it is legal under Norwegian law to make copies of such data for personal use. The verdict was announced on January 7, 2003, acquitting Johansen of all charges.

This being the verdict of the district court, two further levels of appeals were available to the prosecutors, to the appeals court and then to the Supreme Court. Økokrim filed an appeal on January 20, 2003 and it was reported on February 28 that the appeals court (Borgarting lagmannsrett) had agreed to hear the case.

Johansen's second DeCSS trial began in Oslo on December 2, 2003, and resulted in an acquittal on December 22, 2003. Økokrim announced on January 5, 2004 that it would not appeal the case to the Supreme Court.


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#20 jlove

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 07:10 PM

QUOTE (grandpabruce @ Oct 20 2007, 06:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Actually, if you found a version of Lord of the Rings that wasn't copy protected, it is a bootleg copy of the movie, and you can bet your bottom dollar that it is still illegal to have it, or copy it.


Hi Grandpabruce! This is intellectually interesting to me, so I'll continue the conversation if anyone cares to participate. Bootlegs have been owned, copied and distributed for decades--often eventually with the copyright holders blessing (think Grateful Dead and Bob Dylan). But with respect to the law, I do agree with you that purchasing a true bootleg is stealing from the copyright owner and something I disapprove of. The question I was raising is whether a person who uses software to copy a copy protected disk is violating the law as opposed to the person who wrote the software. The peculiar nature of the current digital copyright act is that it forbids taking an action which is intended to accomplish something perfectly legal.

I sympathize with copyright holders because so few of them are seeing a good return on their creativity these days. But when the solution that has been crafted is one that deprives me of the ability to protect my investment or use the product in what most of us agree is a legitimate ("fair") use of the product, then something has gone awry. My only choice in this circumstance is to refrain from buying the product. In the case of something like "Lord of the Rings", for example, if I want to have it as part of my collection, I can wait until it plays on cable, record it to my home video system, and then I can watch it whenever I want (again, as long as I do not distribute or sell it to anyone else). I don't get the highest quality or DVD extras that way, but Hollywood gets a lot less of my money. And so the culture wars continue...

Best regards,

-- Jack Love




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