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karri

Percentage Of Hard Drive Space

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I read here, but can't find the post now, that you should keep, I think it said, 30% of your hard drive free. Does that apply to all sizes? For example 30% of a 400 GB HD would be about 2x as much space as 30% of a 200 GB HD. So, if I have a 400 GB HD, do I need to keep 120 GB free (or really around 110 GB since I think a 400 GB HD is about 365 in reality)? It seems like a lot of space to not use, but I defer to those more experienced in this area. Thanks for any advice :)

 

karri

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Guess I'll throw in what I do.I'm pretty lazy...lol

I have 1 drive in my system and it's partitioned with XP on the larger and Vista on the smaller in a dual boot configuration.

What I do is use Ghost 12 to make an image of each partition seperatly.I can restore either one and so far the dual boot has worked after restore each time.

The only thing I have to be careful of is if I make the image from inside the OS,when Ghost dumps back out to DOS mode to do the image it calls each partition C: so I wind up with 2 C: images on my external drive where I store the images.Just have to be careful to choose the correct one when I restore.

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I always read that a disk needed about 15% open space to defrag properly. I do know that from experience that if a disk gets too full that Windows defragmenter won't work. It is not a problem one just has to clean up some files or put them on another disc. I don't know about third party software.

OK Good to know that if I dip below it isn't going to cause that much of a problem.

Thanks Steve :)

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I can't tackle everything, but I'll give you my thoughts on hard drives.

 

~ Partitioning on a WinXP system is accomplished when you install Windows or with one of the many programs for sale that do partitioning. On Vista, there is a built in feature to partition the drive.

 

~ Keeping data on one partition is accomplished the same way you store information on an external or second internal drive. You simply save it to that location.

 

~ A slave drive is just a second ( or third,etc.) hard drive that doesn't contain Windows. You used to have to know how to change settings in the computer or on the drive itself, but all I've had to do is plug the internal drive in out of the box and had it work properly. It's called 'cable select' and many computer cables do it automatically.

 

~ Internal hard drives are going to be faster than any external hard drive and whether your computer can hold more than one drive depends on your computer. The operating manual for your computer should tell you how many and how to install a second internal hard drive. Although, my new computer didn't have that information and I had to open it up to see that I could install 3 more internal drives.

 

Installing an internal hard drive isn't difficult. If you can use a screwdriver and plug in a lamp, you can do it, but it's best if you follow the computer manufacturer's instructions and make certain you're 'grounded. Windows should automatically detect an internal drive just as they do your external drives.

 

~ As to 'junk', the easiest way to get rid of it is to use Windows\ Add Remove programs when you only have restore cds. Some restore cds allow you to pick and choose what to reinstall and some don't.

 

~ Reformatting takes a lot of time and you can end up in trouble if you don't know what you're doing. It's not that hard, but you've got to make certain that you have all the information you need to reinstall programs and all your data backed up somewhere other than your hard drive. It shouldn't be necessary for a partitioned drive or an external drive unless the drive is a FAT file system.

 

~ I don't know why your system is slowing down. It sounds like you're doing everything right by doing a disk cleanup and defragmenting. Sometimes things appear to slow down as we get more proficient at tasks. Are you restarting your computer occasionally to clean out the RAM memory?

 

 

Lots of great info, thanks ml!

 

ok, partitioning doesn't sound that difficult. I searched my help file for how to do it in XP but the directions didn't match the window I accessed, although it did seem indicate that you could do it fairly easily (not that I would do it right now, just to get an idea :)). Also, my manual does indicate that I could install a second hard drive, which is good to know.

 

I haven't noticed that my whole system slowing down, just when I access files to add in a VW or MyDVD project. This computer has always been very fast at everything, so it was noticeable when it started struggling a little, nothing earth shattering, but I want to avoid any problems if I can and it coincided with approaching the 30% HD full mark. I do restart my computer at least once a day.

 

I neglected to add previously that I have my C drive backed up onto a 500 GB external USB drive. Then I have only the critical, "can't lose" data redundantly backed up onto a smaller USB drive. I have all the programs that I would need to reinstall on discs, except for one. I think it may be on the C drive (and backed up on the USB drive) so I could install that way I think, if I had to?

 

Again, thanks for the great info. Very helpful to me :)

 

I have a backup of my entire main hard drive, in my drawer, so if my main drive goes completely, I have it backed up. Plus, I am backing up all of my important data to an external drive. (Internal drive in an external enclosure)

 

 

Internal drive in an external enclosure sounds like something I would be interested in. What kind of connection do you need for that?

Edited: because INternal and EXternal are not the same thing :)

Edited by karri

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I always recommend partitioning a hard drive, especially if you only have one. For example, my main hard drive has 4 partitions. The C: partition is 40GB and has my XP OS on it, along with a few programs. My D: partition has the bulk of my programs on it. My E: partition has my captured videos, and my F: partition has a mixture of data files and other various program setting backups. Partitions D, E, and F are near 90GB each.

 

Now, if for some reason, my OS goes bonkers, and I can't boot up, no matter what, I can either do a Format C: on that partition, or I can ghost back from a previous backup. In the case of formatting, I will have to install all of my programs again, but all of my data, on other partitions, is not affected.

 

That does sound organized. So, you capture your video to a file in one partition and then open them in VW, edit and save to a file in another partition?

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_memory

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paging

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

 

RAID Level 0 offers the highest performance, with data broken down into blocks and written simultaneously on each drive in the array. Since the input and output loads are spread out over multiple drives, storage performance and throughput can greatly improve. Generally, having more drives in the array and spreading the load over multiple arrays can increase performance. On the other hand, there is no redundancy. If one drive fails, you have lost all of your data. There is no recovery process.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAID

 

 

If you don't have a micro tower and have the connections IDE or SATA. I would use internal drives but like Brendon says that's my opinion! :wacko:

 

cd

 

Thanks for the links, cd. I did quite a bit of reading today. So much to know, so little time to learn it all :)

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I haven't noticed that my whole system slowing down, just when I access files to add in a VW or MyDVD project. This computer has always been very fast at everything, so it was noticeable when it started struggling a little, nothing earth shattering, but I want to avoid any problems if I can and it coincided with approaching the 30% HD full mark. I do restart my computer at least once a day.

Of course, regularly defrag your hard drives for best performance. The defrag in XP is the pitts. Auslogics offers a free defrag program that is fast.

One other thing to look for when your system slows down is what's in your startup. My office pc started crawling and I disabled all startup items and it ran perfect. I then only enabled those things I need such as antivirus, printer etc. and it's fast again. I just read somewhere that occasionally a new program install changes the order of things in start up and just that can cause slow downs. Not sure how much of that I really believe.

Finally, do at least a weekly scan for spyware using more than 1 program. Some freebies are Spybot and Ad-aware

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I'm loving this thread! I've always believed it's a personal choice and one YOU should be comfortable with.

Frank, I've had 2 drives partitioned with the OS on one and data on the 2nd partition that went dead. I used Spinrite (thanks Brendon) to fix the drive (literally took 10 hours) and reinstalled the OS on it and it's still running on my son's computer. All the data on the second partition was untouched and safe. Yes you have to reinstall all your programs but I think time is saved. All this is really moot if you have good image backups to simply replace both partitions. I backup both partitions at the same time.

karri said:

 

I have 1 500GB drive with Vista on 45GB and the rest into 2 other partitions (not equal). 1 has data and the last is only video. So, I feel I could loose the OS and data and still have video. OR, loose data and video and still have OS or........you get the picture. Stuff happens and drives are cheap enough to keep more than one backup around even if they're done weeks apart. Having some info saved is better than nothing.

There are free partitioning programs around karri and for the most part, it's rather simple but that in no way makes it 100% safe. Based on my reading of your posts, I have a feeling that once you watched someone do it, you'd have no trouble. A program like Acronis Disc Director allows you to work in either Auto or Manual mode. And, if you ever decide you want to try it, it's really best to do before you do a reinstall. Doing partition work after all is done is certainly what these programs do but it would be safer to do so before a reinstall.

 

It would be great to have someone to watch (hmm... there's an idea for a video series :)). I don't want to create more troubles than I was trying to avoid in the first place. :o

 

I think I will read up on Acronis. Disc imaging seem so intangible, but I've noticed more than a few here use it. Thanks for the tip about doing it before a reinstall, and all the other good info you provided here for me :)

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Of course, regularly defrag your hard drives for best performance. The defrag in XP is the pitts. Auslogics offers a free defrag program that is fast.

One other thing to look for when your system slows down is what's in your startup. My office pc started crawling and I disabled all startup items and it ran perfect. I then only enabled those things I need such as antivirus, printer etc. and it's fast again. I just read somewhere that occasionally a new program install changes the order of things in start up and just that can cause slow downs. Not sure how much of that I really believe.

Finally, do at least a weekly scan for spyware using more than 1 program. Some freebies are Spybot and Ad-aware

 

More good info while I was posting! Thanks! I will try auslogics. (I've only used the one in XP) I regularly run Spybot, Ad-Aware, and Spy Sweeper.

 

I definitely have more stuff in my start up than I should. When I disable things that I believe I don't need, my computer starts in some sort of lower-functioning mode? I am not remembering well but it gives the option to undo the changes or live with the consequences. I take the option to undo because I'm not sure what the consequences might be :huh: At the risk of drifting further from the topic, I could really use help with that.

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It would be great to have someone to watch (hmm... there's an idea for a video series :)). I don't want to create more troubles than I was trying to avoid in the first place. :o

 

I think I will read up on Acronis. Disc imaging seem so intangible, but I've noticed more than a few here use it. Thanks for the tip about doing it before a reinstall, and all the other good info you provided here for me :)

Pay my airfare, room and board (and some beer of course) and I'll come and help! :lol:

karri, here's something I just thought of and tried myself and another reason why you just gotta love the internets :o Just go to youtube.com and in the search, type ACRONIS and you'll see 44 different tutorials. Some are for v9, some for v10 and some for v11 but they 9 & 10 are almost identical and not too very much has changed in 11. If you like it, you might be able to find v10 online somewhere cheap. v11 is on Newegg for $29.

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Guest ml

More explanation:

~An internal drive in an external encloser is this.... you buy an internal drive and you buy an external enclosure that will fit it. Then you follow the included directions, plug in the two connections that come with it, attach it with screws, and slide it into the enclosure and tighten the screws for the outer enclosure. Usually they are USB connections for the computer, but occasionally you'll find one with an IEEE1394 connections.

 

~It sounds like you've already got a good method of backing up your data. So unless you find the need for more internal hard disk space, you may not need a second internal hard drive. However, with prices falling, you may eventually give into temptation and get one.

 

~You need something like the Acronis software to partition that hard drive in WinXP without having to reinstall everything. It might be cheaper in the long run to get a second internal hard drive.

 

~As to the lower functioning mode.... not really. When you go to Run and type msconfig, you'll get a box and one of the tabs is Startup. Take a look at where the program comes from under Manufacturer and Command. You may find programs there that you don't need. For example, a calendar that you don't use that was installed by a program .... or an instant messaging service like Yahoo that you don't use every day. When you uncheck it, Apply and OK, your computer will probably restart and when you get the message box warning you that you've made changes, tell it not to warn you again.

 

All Startup does is start those programs when you start your computer. If you uncheck them from the Startup tab, you can still use the programs. You'll just have to either select them from the Programs meu or wait a couple of seconds more for them to startup. And you can always go back and check them again in the msconfig Startup Tab. It's best however, not to uncheck the Microsoft\ Windows\system or other Microsoft programs.

Edited by ml

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Lots of great info, thanks ml!

 

ok, partitioning doesn't sound that difficult. I searched my help file for how to do it in XP but the directions didn't match the window I accessed, although it did seem indicate that you could do it fairly easily (not that I would do it right now, just to get an idea :)). Also, my manual does indicate that I could install a second hard drive, which is good to know.

 

I haven't noticed that my whole system slowing down, just when I access files to add in a VW or MyDVD project. This computer has always been very fast at everything, so it was noticeable when it started struggling a little, nothing earth shattering, but I want to avoid any problems if I can and it coincided with approaching the 30% HD full mark. I do restart my computer at least once a day.

 

I neglected to add previously that I have my C drive backed up onto a 500 GB external USB drive. Then I have only the critical, "can't lose" data redundantly backed up onto a smaller USB drive. I have all the programs that I would need to reinstall on discs, except for one. I think it may be on the C drive (and backed up on the USB drive) so I could install that way I think, if I had to?

 

Again, thanks for the great info. Very helpful to me :)

 

 

 

 

Internal drive in an external enclosure sounds like something I would be interested in. What kind of connection do you need for that?

Edited: because INternal and EXternal are not the same thing :)

 

The external enclosures that I have are for internal SATA drives. The enclosures came with a firewire cable and a USB cable. I have mine connected, to my computer, via the firewire.

 

That does sound organized. So, you capture your video to a file in one partition and then open them in VW, edit and save to a file in another partition?

 

Yes, I save my productions (not output to an .avi) to a partition on my 2nd hard drive, which is in the computer, not the external.

Edited by grandpabruce

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Pay my airfare, room and board (and some beer of course) and I'll come and help! :lol:

 

Ahhh, don't tempt me! (Hmm, we could make you a youtube star) :D

 

karri, here's something I just thought of and tried myself and another reason why you just gotta love the internets :o Just go to youtube.com and in the search, type ACRONIS and you'll see 44 different tutorials. Some are for v9, some for v10 and some for v11 but they 9 & 10 are almost identical and not too very much has changed in 11. If you like it, you might be able to find v10 online somewhere cheap. v11 is on Newegg for $29.

 

Great idea, thanks!

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More explanation:

~An internal drive in an external encloser is this.... you buy an internal drive and you buy an external enclosure that will fit it. Then you follow the included directions, plug in the two connections that come with it, attach it with screws, and slide it into the enclosure and tighten the screws for the outer enclosure. Usually they are USB connections for the computer, but occasionally you'll find one with an IEEE1394 connections.

 

 

~It sounds like you've already got a good method of backing up your data. So unless you find the need for more internal hard disk space, you may not need a second internal hard drive. However, with prices falling, you may eventually give into temptation and get one.

 

~You need something like the Acronis software to partition that hard drive in WinXP without having to reinstall everything. It might be cheaper in the long run to get a second internal hard drive.

 

~As to the lower functioning mode.... not really. When you go to Run and type msconfig, you'll get a box and one of the tabs is Startup. Take a look at where the program comes from under Manufacturer and Command. You may find programs there that you don't need. For example, a calendar that you don't use that was installed by a program .... or an instant messaging service like Yahoo that you don't use every day. When you uncheck it, Apply and OK, your computer will probably restart and when you get the message box warning you that you've made changes, tell it not to warn you again.

 

All Startup does is start those programs when you start your computer. If you uncheck them from the Startup tab, you can still use the programs. You'll just have to either select them from the Programs meu or wait a couple of seconds more for them to startup. And you can always go back and check them again in the msconfig Startup Tab. It's best however, not to uncheck the Microsoft\ Windows\system or other Microsoft programs.

 

Great, installing an internal drive into an external enclosure sounds like something I could do. Thanks! And I'm going to check out Acronis. I'll give unchecking the StartUp items another try. I really think that will make a difference, since there are quite a few items listed in there.

 

Thanks again for all your help!

 

The external enclosures that I have are for internal SATA drives. The enclosures came with a firewire cable and a USB cable. I have mine connected, to my computer, via the firewire.

 

 

 

Yes, I save my productions (not output to an .avi) to a partition on my 2nd hard drive, which is in the computer, not the external.

 

Perfect, thanks Bruce, this is something I could do :)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by karri

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Thanks to everyone who replied here. I have some great information now, lots of options, and I am so much more confident about what is possible. You really came through for me, and I appreciate it greatly. Many thanks :)

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Thanks to everyone who replied here. I have some great information now, lots of options, and I am so much more confident about what is possible. You really came through for me, and I appreciate it greatly. Many thanks :)

 

You're welcome, although we did drift from the original topic. :)

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You're welcome, although we did drift from the original topic. :)

 

And it was a good drift! :) I couldn't buy this kind of info, even if I could it wouldn't be as valuable because it's coming first-hand from experienced users; I couldn't get this from a book or website. Thanks again :)

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Of course, regularly defrag your hard drives for best performance. The defrag in XP is the pitts. Auslogics offers a free defrag program that is fast.

 

Tried Auslogic ... fast is an understatement: 21 minutes, compared to XP Defrag utility. I'm not sure how long that takes, I always fall alseep or wander off waiting for it :D

 

Thanks! :)

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Tried Auslogic ... fast is an understatement: 21 minutes, compared to XP Defrag utility. I'm not sure how long that takes, I always fall alseep or wander off waiting for it :D

 

Thanks! :)

So fast it almost makes you wonder if it really did anything, huh? :D

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So fast it almost makes you wonder if it really did anything, huh? :D

 

I haven't tried Auslogic. I have used Diskeeper for years, and I still like it. I got 2 licenses of the 2008 Pro version, about a month ago. It isn't inexpensive, though.

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Tried Auslogic ... fast is an understatement: 21 minutes, compared to XP Defrag utility. I'm not sure how long that takes, I always fall alseep or wander off waiting for it :D

 

Thanks! :)

 

Hey Karri, you think 21 minutes is fast, take a look at this defrag report...I couldn't believe it !!!

And my thanks too Paul for the link for this program :)

 

Frank...

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Hey Karri, you think 21 minutes is fast, take a look at this defrag report...I couldn't believe it !!!

And my thanks too Paul for the link for this program :)

 

Frank...

Frank, it appears your drive was not badly defragmented. I tried this program on my wife's laptop that is hardly ever defragged (hey it's hers, not mine!) and it was badly fragmented and it took about 20 minutes. Granted, it's a slower laptop too but 20 minutes still beats what XP what have done.

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Frank, it appears your drive was not badly defragmented. I tried this program on my wife's laptop that is hardly ever defragged (hey it's hers, not mine!) and it was badly fragmented and it took about 20 minutes. Granted, it's a slower laptop too but 20 minutes still beats what XP what have done.

 

Yeah Paul, you're probably right about my drive not being fragmented that bad. But what really got me was even when I defrag a drive that I know is not that bad, with the default OS defragmenter, it takes a whole lot longer that's for sure. Anyway, the Auslogic program will certainly be the one I use from now on. Muchas Gracias for the link :)

 

Frank...

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So fast it almost makes you wonder if it really did anything, huh? :D

 

hmm ... lol ... no, I believe it did, the little blue sectors shuffling into place tell me so :D

 

Hey Karri, you think 21 minutes is fast, take a look at this defrag report...I couldn't believe it !!!

And my thanks too Paul for the link for this program :)

 

Frank...

 

This is great Frank, hopefully this will be me now that I've used it once - Next time may be even faster :)

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