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Drag-to-disc

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I have just gotten the new roxio 10, and in version number 9 there was a drag to disc feature. This was great for myself and other employees as we could make a multi-session disc with a movie, and an excel file. all we had to do was drag to the disc and they would be written on it. Is this feature on version 10 but 'locked' somehow? any help???

 

BTW i have the studio version (99USD) not the deluxe suite (129USD)

 

 

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This feature is no longer available because packet writing is now built into Windows Vista. Nero also dropped their version of it called InCD.

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What do you do if you aren't running that trashy "Vista"? (The opinions expressed are that of the author only and not of Roxio!) I just went to look for it today after having problems installing...got those ironed out.

Edited by DigiMattPhoto

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What do you do if you aren't running that trashy "Vista"

 

three options DigiMattPhoto

 

1. live and lump it and move on with EMC10 minus drag to disk

2. roll back to version 9 that has it

3. find an application that will enable you to do it (3rd party app)

 

sorry to be blunt but there is nothing else you can do

Edited by The Highlander

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You can run version 9's D2D with EMC10.

 

Hi Brendon!

I like your #4 choice better than Highlanders 3 choices...:^) Can you tell a "novice" like me how to do this? I still have the downloaded version 9 installation files, which I assume I need. Is there a way to just install D2D??

 

Thanks to all for your answers!

 

Matt

Edited by DigiMattPhoto

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Hi Brendon!

I like your #4 choice better than Highlanders 3 choices...:^) Can you tell a "novice" like me how to do this? I still have the downloaded version 9 installation files, which I assume I need. Is there a way to just install D2D??

 

Thanks to all for your answers!

 

Matt

 

Unless you are doing immediate transfers of data, from one computer to another, you are safer using Creator Classic for backing up important data. Using Drag to Disc, or any other packet writing software, to back up your important data, is like playing Russian Roulette.

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Matt,

 

I mentioned this because it can be done, but I agree with Bruce, and I can't recommend using packet writing for anything involving important data.

 

Installing it would involve you reinstalling EMC9 alongside EMC10.

 

If you're really determined to do this despite all the pitfalls, please click on my name alongside this post and send me a message.

 

Regards,

Brendon

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Thanks Bruce & Brendon for setting me straight. So what I am getting from this is, the 300+ CD that I have written with D2D should be immediately transferred to a more stable media, perhaps an external drive? I am not that technical and wasn't aware HOW D2D was writing to the disc...just the ease of doing it (most of the time). I have been backing up photograph digital files for that past few versions of EMC. I started this years backups (2008) on a WD external USB drive.

 

Does anyone have alternative suggestions? I literally have 1Gb or more of picture files with each shoot.

 

Thanks again for all the answers!

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Hi Matt,

 

I suspect the first thing you should do is see if you can read a selection of these backup discs. There are compatibility issues between various versions of the writing software, and some folks have problems reading their discs after making a change.

 

Since you've made 300+ discs it's not likely you've used RW discs, which is a relief. They don't hold data as long or as well as CDR discs.

 

If your XP can read them with its built-in reader, then you're in quite a good position. You could retain them in their present form and read them as long as XP doesn't change anything. However Microsoft is not predictable, and I think you would be better off shifting your backups to a more standard medium which doesn't require a special reader.

 

An external drive is a good form of backup for large collections of data, but with precious photos I would go for the belt-and-braces approach. I would also burn them to plastic. 300 CDs would fit on a spindle of 50 DVDs, and stored properly in cool, dark, and dry should last for longer than I will.

 

It depends on how valuable your photos are, but if it were me I'd use the external drive for working storage, and DVDs for archiving.

 

Go well,

Brendon

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Hi Matt,

 

I suspect the first thing you should do is see if you can read a selection of these backup discs. There are compatibility issues between various versions of the writing software, and some folks have problems reading their discs after making a change.

 

Since you've made 300+ discs it's not likely you've used RW discs, which is a relief. They don't hold data as long or as well as CDR discs.

 

If your XP can read them with its built-in reader, then you're in quite a good position. You could retain them in their present form and read them as long as XP doesn't change anything. However Microsoft is not predictable, and I think you would be better off shifting your backups to a more standard medium which doesn't require a special reader.

 

An external drive is a good form of backup for large collections of data, but with precious photos I would go for the belt-and-braces approach. I would also burn them to plastic. 300 CDs would fit on a spindle of 50 DVDs, and stored properly in cool, dark, and dry should last for longer than I will.

 

It depends on how valuable your photos are, but if it were me I'd use the external drive for working storage, and DVDs for archiving.

 

Go well,

Brendon

Let me also tag on that CD-R media is also a viable storage medium, and should last a long time. The issue is really how you wrote the discs, and how long you'll be able to read them simply because of the nature of packet writing and how it is supported. As Brendon said, copying them to DVD would be a reasonable alternative, but so would copying them to new CD-R media, only doing it using an application like Creator Classic, which creates a standard CD-R Data disc, which should be readable for a long time, and store your data quite reliably. Another consideration is that the loss of one DVD backup disc is roughly the equivalent of losing 6 CD's worth of data.

 

And the belt-and-suspenders approach of HD and optical media is good too.

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Hi Dave,

 

I only suggested DVDs because DVDs cost the same as CDs where I live, yet hold 6x the data.

I don't know if CDs are 1/6th of the price of DVDs where Matt lives.

 

Regards to all,

Brendon

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Hi Dave,

 

I only suggested DVDs because DVDs cost the same as CDs where I live, yet hold 6x the data.

I don't know if CDs are 1/6th of the price of DVDs where Matt lives.

 

Regards to all,

Brendon

It's true about the price... I just wanted to point out that either is good for long term storage, when written well, and not get him thinking that CD-R media is not a viable choice.

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For irreplaceable pictures I put them on 2, CD's (or DVD's) and store them in separate locations.

 

If I were accessing them frequently, I would use a 3 CD/DVD's. - 2 for archive and one for the day to day working disc.

 

All are written using Authoring, Creator Classic and Finalized. And they were tested!!!

 

I also have my home PC's networked so these pictures are also backed-up by putting them on different drives and some drives have even been removed and stored.

 

As far as CD vs DVD??? We won't really know until years from now.

 

I have had one CD-R fail that was written in 1999 and 2000 using sessions. Even recovery programs cannot recover these files. It was after this that I decided multiple backups were needed and I Finalize each as an extra precaution.

 

I don't like backup programs because you are always locked into a proprietary program in order to recover the files.

 

Of course you do not know if that "program" will even run when you need it! I have used MicroSoft Backup only to find it was incompatible with early versions and the files were not recoverable! I have used 2 others, which are no longer in business, and the recovery programs would not even run on today's operating systems.

 

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I have had one CD-R fail that was written in 1999 and 2000 using sessions. Even recovery programs cannot recover these files. It was after this that I decided multiple backups were needed and I Finalize each as an extra precaution.

 

I don't like backup programs because you are always locked into a proprietary program in order to recover the files.

 

Of course you do not know if that "program" will even run when you need it! I have used MicroSoft Backup only to find it was incompatible with early versions and the files were not recoverable! I have used 2 others, which are no longer in business, and the recovery programs would not even run on today's operating systems.

I know of one person who does similar backups, Jim. And then occasionally, he tests those CD backups for errors using something like CD/DVD Diagnostic. If/when the recoverable error rates start to go up, and while the discs are still readable, he makes a new copy to "refresh" them.

 

With enough data stored, eventually it'll be a full time job to test and re-copy this stuff.

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I know of one person who does similar backups, Jim. And then occasionally, he tests those CD backups for errors using something like CD/DVD Diagnostic. If/when the recoverable error rates start to go up, and while the discs are still readable, he makes a new copy to "refresh" them.

 

With enough data stored, eventually it'll be a full time job to test and re-copy this stuff.

Yes that is the problem… Do you have a solution you would recommend?

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Yes that is the problem… Do you have a solution you would recommend?

Nope, but I do feel that paper is an underrated storage backup media for digital photos. Properly stored (in a drawer or book where they won't be exposed to light) they should last quite awhile. Archival inks would also help. Do I do that with all my "good" digital photos? No. :(

 

Important on-line documents (e-mails, blogs, etc.) could be "archived" the same way, but who wants to store that? It's a bit of a pickle. Historians pore over scraps of paper hundreds, even thousands of years old and get useful glimpses of times past. But what's going to be left to look over from this generation? Where will all those e-mails between today's important figures be stored, to be uncovered in the future, exposing some shocking secret? Some HD somewhere? An obscure CD? Will they be readable? Or will it all just be erased with nothing left to find? Starting with the current generation, there's a real possibility of history being lost.

 

No, I don't have an answer, I'm not sure there is one at this point.

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Or will it all just be erased with nothing left to find? Starting with the current generation, there's a real possibility of history being lost.

Already happening. How many of today's kids remember those few seconds which were 'lost' from the Oval Office backups? [or does that 'date' me?]

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Already happening. How many of today's kids remember those few seconds which were 'lost' from the Oval Office backups? [or does that 'date' me?]

That came to mind when I was writing the above. I just did a quick search, and it's 18 1/2 minutes of missing tape, which even as of 2001 or so they were trying to see if any intelligible audio could be recovered, and at this point, the answer was "no". Yes, that dates us.

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Thanks, Guys for setting me straight on the D2D "packet writing" crap. I have now begun the arduous task of transferring the D2D written disks over to DVD+r data disks with the use of Classic Creator. Even that gave me a fight! I had to look up on the forum here for "EMC10 won't start at all" because mine wouldn't...and Brendon's (I think) only answer was a uninstall and reinstall...which I had to do twice because of some glitch with "watch tray" or some crap like that...(sigh)

 

So I finally got EMC10 cleanly installed (so far, so good...) and proceeded to put my "Backup_001" in the drive to start copying...only to find that Creator Classic crashed if I selected "all" and told it to "Add". So I tried it one folder at a time...and it didn't crash! It hung on the program and wouldn't let me do anything else and I needed to ctrl-alt-del to close the program...just sat there looking like it had added the folder, but "dinging" every time I clicked on anything else.

 

What finally worked was transferring the contents of my D2D "backups" to a USB 250Gb HD...and then they transfer fine to the "project"...but wait, that's not all!...

 

Disk #2 goes into my desktop machine dvd/cd drive...I click to open to transfer to my USB 250...ERROR MESSAGE!!! Now my desktop machine is telling me that "The disk structure is corrupted and unreadable." "Crap", I thought...tried the disk in my laptop and it, at least, recognized it...as a blank, ready to write CD. Another "Crap", I thought...and rebooted the laptop with the disk in the drive...Voila! I had READABLE, TRANSFERRABLE FILES! About freakin' time! I quickly transferred the USB 250 over to the laptop, transferred the files, swapped the drive back to the desktop and wrote my first backup DVD...it held 7 of the CD backups. (whew) Only problem is that I have to reboot the laptop EACH TIME I get one of these "corrupt and unreadable" disks...but at least I am getting the data!

 

In this process, I will be filling up the USB 250Gb and leaving the files on there...when full, I will move to another and have the USB HD to put in a safe deposit box. The DVD backups will probably get copied again, when I get through my 300+ CD's.

 

If you read through all this, I hope you were laughing right along with me. I really do appreciate the input I got from all of you.

 

Sincerely,

Matt M Smith

Matt@DigiMattPhoto.com

Edited by DigiMattPhoto

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Whew!! A real saga there, Matt.

 

I'm very glad you came through it and out this side all right. There are a lot of people who don't :(

 

Cheers,

Brendon

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