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sleepyduck

Mac OS error code -50 burning from EyeTV

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Hi All

 

I'm having trouble burning a recording exported from EyeTV 2. The file exports fine to Toast (I'm using 7.1) and the progress bar goes all the way along during the "multiplexing" stage, but when it gets to the end I get the message that the operation can't be completed because of a Mac OS error code -50.

 

I'm using a MacBook with 2Gig of RAM, 10.4.7 and the most up to date versions of everything. I've tried restarting, repairing permissions, saving as a disk image, all with the same result. The odd thing is that I burned another recording a couple of days ago with no problems at all and I haven't changed a thing since then.

 

All suggestions welcome - and thanks in advance!

 

Paul

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Having now had time to build some experience with eyeTV and Toast 7, I am able to draw some pragmatic conclusions. My eyeTV program is up to date and I am using Toast 7.0.2 as 7.1 (pre update) continually led to error -50 when multiplexing. Trying to transfer a feature film to a video DVD has produced, for me, 3 possible outcomes:

1. Complete Success. (24)

2. Film can be watched but will not fast forward and crashes DVD Player if I attempt to step through the

chapters. (3)

3. DVD Player crashes early on playback, usually during the credits. (9)

I noticed that the films in category 1 all had file sizes of at least 2GB and frequently much more. This suggested that the problems arises from excessive compression of the transmission. Obviously the file size is also related to playing time so I adopted an index calculated by dividing the file size in MBytes by the playing time in mins. If this figure is at least 24 I can be very confident of success. Most of the complete failures are in the range 18 to 20. The 3 films in the second category, surprisingly, have indexes of 16,17,17. I have no explanation for that. I find that all films made specifically for TV, such as Poirot, West Wing , Maigret and Desperate Housewives, give no problems and that they typically have indexes of 24/25.

 

Perhaps someone or knows about compresssed TV transmission could comment.

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Regarding your 3 playback issues, make sure the buffer underrun prevention is turned off during recording. My DVD player does all those things if it was used on a particular DVD.

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Regarding yoru 3 playback issues, make sure the buffer underrun prevention is turned off during recording. My DVD player does all those things if it was used on a particular DVD.

 

Thanks for this suggestion but deselecting this option has no effect. Last night's broadcast of "Short Cuts" had an information content of 17 MB per min and, sure enough, it plays without the facility of fast forward. The menu button is also disabled on the Mac DVD Player.

 

It is significant that none of the low content transmissions have come from the BBC. It seems to be that the commercial channels are applying compression to some films but not others. I would like to know if other users can confirm or contradict my results. eyeTV seems to cope with compressed films successfully but Toast doesn't. Is this a shortcoming that can be correctd or is it a more fundamental problem?

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ejstubbs suggested...

 

[*]In the "Format" window, select "Custom" and click the "More" button.

[*]A window will appear over the top of the main window, offering you options to rename the disc etc.

[*]Select the other tab on that window (I think it's called "Encoding" or something like that).

[*]There's lots of options on that window but IIRC the one you want is called "Encoding". Select "Always" from the drop-down list, leave the other options as they are and click the "Done" button.

This should force Toast to re-encode the video stream with DVD-standard-compliant GOP.

 

The downside is that the re-encoding often results in a video which is too large to fit on a DVD.

 

...I did this and here are some observations. When you select "always encode" the space required doubles. For a standard feature film it exceeds the 4.3gb that you get on a DVD. If you reduce the average bit rate and the maximum bit rate you can make it small enough to get it on to a DVD. The alternative is to "save as disk image" from Toast's file menu and Toast then produces a re-encoded disk image in your documents folder. You then mount the disk image, open the folder and drag and drop the VT folder into Toast. It then requires about half as much space as the original.

 

The problem is that, whether you go for the reduced bit rates or the route via the disk image and maximum bit rates, the result is full of dropouts that are so gross as to make the film unwatchable.

 

Anyone got any ideas?

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...I did this and here are some observations. When you select "always encode" the space required doubles. For a standard feature film it exceeds the 4.3gb that you get on a DVD. If you reduce the average bit rate and the maximum bit rate you can make it small enough to get it on to a DVD. The alternative is to "save as disk image" from Toast's file menu and Toast then produces a re-encoded disk image in your documents folder. You then mount the disk image, open the folder and drag and drop the VT folder into Toast. It then requires about half as much space as the original.

 

The problem is that, whether you go for the reduced bit rates or the route via the disk image and maximum bit rates, the result is full of dropouts that are so gross as to make the film unwatchable.

 

Anyone got any ideas?

I have experienced the dropouts problem and reported it to Elgato, who claimed to be working the problem with Roxio. (I've never had any useful feedback reporting problems to Roxio themselves.) The only way around it I've found so far is to open the MPEG program stream with MPEGStreamView and export it as a new MPEG file after fixing timecode breaks etc. I then burn the resulting MPEG file with Toast, adjusting bit rates etc as you describe to make it fit on a single disc. Having to do this suggests to me that there is an issue with the quality of the MPEG program stream captured by EyeTV (though to be fair to Elgato that might be down to problems with the broadcast signal quality or the aerial/downlead - as far as I know the MPEG program stream is recorded as-is, with no further processing by EyeTV).

 

The above is a long-winded process and still isn't guaranteed to work so I usually burn a disc image first, test that in the Apple DVD Player, and then re-burn to DVD. I only have to do this with Film4 content, and I'm convinced it's because of the non-standard GOP they use. I have noticed that Film4+1 uses a maximum GOP of 12, but the picture quality on that channel is worse than Film4 because they use an even lower bit rate for Film4+1. I don't recall seeing the -50 problem with recordings from any other channel (although I do tend to stick to the mainstream channels ie BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and Five).

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so I usually burn a disc image first, test that in the Apple DVD Player, and then re-burn to DVD.

 

EJ,

 

Can you please explain that very slowly, in steps (I'm very much a beginner here).

 

Many thanks

 

Graham

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so I usually burn a disc image first, test that in the Apple DVD Player, and then re-burn to DVD.

 

First export to Toast from EyeTV, then choose "Save as Disk Image" under Toast's File Menu. You may need to double-click the image to mount it. Then launch DVD Player and open the files in the VideoTS folder. When you're happy that all is well, you can drag the image into Toast, open it from the File Menu, etc. Then burn as normal.

 

BTW, this is necsaary to burn files larger than 4.3 GB (on Dual Layer disks).

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Sizzle doesn't work for me either. I have found that the only satisfactory way of producing a DVD from a Film4 broadcast is the mpeg workround. Curiously it doesn't always re-encode, but it does squeeze the film on to the disk, it does provide the soundtrack and it does preserve the lip-synchronisation, which has gone awry in other workrounds. For anyone joining this thread and using EyeTV and Toast the process is as follows...

 

1.Edit out adverts using EyeTV in the usual way.

2.Export the edited file to a .mpg on the desktop using EyeTV -> File, Export, MPEG Programme Stream

3.Drag and drop the .mpg file into Toast.

4.Then, in Toast -> File,Save as disk image - this is the re-encoding stage, which takes a long time (overnight job)

5.Mount the resulting disk image using Toast -> Utilities, Mount Disk image

6.Burn disk using Toast -> DVD Video from Video_TS (drag the Video_TS folder from the mounted disk image into Toast)

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Hii,, You are getting the Mac OS error 50 because the files are not copying from in location to another. This can happen if the files are corrupted. You can fix the error issue if you can get the backup copy of the corrupted file from the time machine or any other source. If the backup is not available then you can get help from the given location : http://www.macfixz.com/how-to-fix-error-mac-code-50-get-corrupted-deleted-mac-data-recovered

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