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MQL

Question Re: Save Disc Image File.

Question

Please forgive this is really simple question.

I just need to double check my understanding of how this works.

 

When burning a project to dvd:

 

Does checking the 'Save disc image file' box mean all the avi>dvd encoding gets saved and so the project can be burned again at a later date without having to encode again?

 

Ive wasted 6 hours encoding a disc which then didnt burn correctly (dodgy blank dvd). Am I right in thinking had I saved the image file as an iso- I would be in better shape right now?

 

 

Does that saved iso then take up the same amount of space on the hard drive as the original files?

 

Thanks in advance.

Mel QL

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Hi Mel,

 

Yes, checking that box saves the result of your encoding as an ISO image.

 

I usually turn OFF the burning to disc, and have the program burn to ISO. Reasons for this are that it separates the encoding of your DVD from the burning, and if you are wanting many copies you have the ISO to burn from without needing to recode.

 

Does that saved iso then take up the same amount of space on the hard drive as the original files?

 

Usually an ISO file will be a lot larger than the original source files depending what the source files were. DVDs are encoded at a standard rate, the same as when they were first developed, but video file compression has advanced a lot since then so your source files now are usually much more compressed. For example, a modern one-hour AVI file might be as little as 450 MB at a reasonable definition but when converted to a DVD it would fill the DVD.

 

Regards,

Brendon

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Hi Mel,

 

Yes, checking that box saves the result of your encoding as an ISO image.

 

I usually turn OFF the burning to disc, and have the program burn to ISO. Reasons for this are that it separates the encoding of your DVD from the burning, and if you are wanting many copies you have the ISO to burn from without needing to recode.

 

 

 

Usually an ISO file will be a lot larger than the original source files depending what the source files were. DVDs are encoded at a standard rate, the same as when they were first developed, but video file compression has advanced a lot since then so your source files now are usually much more compressed. For example, a modern one-hour AVI file might be as little as 450 MB at a reasonable definition but when converted to a DVD it would fill the DVD.

 

Regards,

Brendon

 

Hi Brendan, thanks for the swift response and for taking the time to give me a brief tutorial!

 

I had a couple of 'Aha!' moments while reading your post! Its going to change the way I do things. The sheer futility of wasting that kind of time/effort made me realise there had to be a better way of doing things.

 

Plus your information regarding the compression of avi files is especially valuable.

 

thanks again,

Mel.

Edited by MQL

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