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baronvonf

Burning Dvd From Mov Or Avi With Smooth Panning/motion

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Hi everyone,

 

I have Toast 11.0.4 and Toast 10.0.8 on my Intel Mac Pro (OS 10.6.8).

I've been burning dvd's of avi or mov files and have noticed that the horizontal and vertical camera panning of scenes have been very jerky.

Is there any way to remedy this in the Toast settings?

The settings that I've been using are (for both 10.0.8 and 11.0.4):

 

Video Format: MPEG-2

Average Bit-Rate: 5.5 mbps

Maximum Bit-Rate: 7.5 mbps

Motion Estimation: Best with "Half-PEL" checked

Reencoding: Automatic

Field Dominance: Automatic

Aspect Ratio: Automatic

(I'm not sure if audio encoding would be a factor, so I'm not including those settings)

 

Often, the avi's or mov's that I burn to DVD are in PAL format (either 25 fps or 23.976 fps) and get re-encoded to NTSC (29.97 fps).

Should I convert the video files to NTSC format first (with either Quicktime Pro or MPEGGER) so that the motion is smoother when burned as a VIDEO-TS with Toast?

 

A second question- why won't external subtitles (srt's) load and burn in Toast anymore? (the subs have the exact same file name as the movie, except for the extensions). I use the Perian plug-in, which used to work. I don't like using the Divx plug because of the bug that it places in the video file.

 

Thank you in advance for any help!

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All I can suggest is to take a short clip that has that issue and do some experimenting. It probably will help to convert first to a full quality QuickTime movie. I found when helping my brother with his conversions that the best quality came from choosing Progressive rather than Interlaced in the QuickTime custom settings window.

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All I can suggest is to take a short clip that has that issue and do some experimenting. It probably will help to convert first to a full quality QuickTime movie. I found when helping my brother with his conversions that the best quality came from choosing Progressive rather than Interlaced in the QuickTime custom settings window.

 

Thank you tsantee.

I've since done some more research and found that when converting a film's frame rate by "upsampling" or "downsampling" it (say 25 fps to 29.97 or 29.97 fps to 23.976) the movement tends to get jerky (most noticeable in pan sequences). The progressive setting rather than the interlaced definitely helps, but applying frame blending when exporting to the new fps tends to smooth out the motion.

Sadly, I don't think that's an option in Quicktime Pro.

Edited by baronvonf

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