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8 Gb To Data Dvd?

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Can an 8 GB file be burned onto multiple 4.7 GB data DVDs? Want to use data DVDs as backup to video files. But the 2 hour videos are larger than 4.7 GB. I do not have blue-ray and prefer not to use DL.

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Can an 8 GB file be burned onto multiple 4.7 GB data DVDs? Want to use data DVDs as backup to video files. But the 2 hour videos are larger than 4.7 GB. I do not have blue-ray and prefer not to use DL.

 

Didn't you ask this before in a different part of the forum (here)? Do you now have Creator 2012?

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Can an 8 GB file be burned onto multiple 4.7 GB data DVDs? Want to use data DVDs as backup to video files. But the 2 hour videos are larger than 4.7 GB. I do not have blue-ray and prefer not to use DL.

You could split your huge file into large chunks of data with something like HJSPLIT or any of the other free file-splitters available on the Internet, and then store the chunks on single-layer DVDs having regard to the maximum size of chunk that the file system you're using allows on the DVD.

 

If you need to 're-constitute' one of these megafiles later, you copy all the chunks back onto your hard drive and then stitch them back together with HJSplit. In the case of a 50 GB megafile you'd need at least 100 GB free - 50 for the chunks, and 50 for the restored file.

 

I've named the splitter I prefer, but if you want another just do a search for "file-splitting programs" on the Internet.

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Didn't you ask this before in a different part of the forum (here)? Do you now have Creator 2012?

My question on the VHS to DVD forum was concerning using the video DVD as backup storage (DVDs that work in a DVD player). The question was "can a video DVD be copied back to a hard drive?"

 

My question on this forum is whether a data DVD can be made from 8 GB mpeg files. The data DVD would be used as backup storage.

 

I'm trying to use DVDs as a backup to the mpeg files on my hard drive. If the hard drive is lost, then use the DVDs to re-populate a new hard drive.

 

A guy at work suggested Zip compress the 8 GB mpeg files and then burn a data DVD disc. But my computer gives an error message because the compressed file is too large.

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My question on the VHS to DVD forum was concerning using the video DVD as backup storage (DVDs that work in a DVD player). The question was "can a video DVD be copied back to a hard drive?"

 

My question on this forum is whether a data DVD can be made from 8 GB mpeg files. The data DVD would be used as backup storage.

 

I'm trying to use DVDs as a backup to the mpeg files on my hard drive. If the hard drive is lost, then use the DVDs to re-populate a new hard drive.

 

A guy at work suggested Zip compress the 8 GB mpeg files and then burn a data DVD disc. But my computer gives an error message because the compressed file is too large.

 

You won't gain anything by trying to zip-compress the video files - they are already compressed.

 

Why don't you simply capture in 60 minute segments. That way you don't have to foll around with 3rd party programs.

 

sknis's question still stands: do you have C2012? If not then your question should have been posted in the General Chat forum since your question has nothing to do with any Roxio program

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My question on this forum is whether a data DVD can be made from 8 GB mpeg files. The data DVD would be used as backup storage.

 

I'm trying to use DVDs as a backup to the mpeg files on my hard drive. If the hard drive is lost, then use the DVDs to re-populate a new hard drive.

 

A guy at work suggested Zip compress the 8 GB mpeg files and then burn a data DVD disc. But my computer gives an error message because the compressed file is too large.

My suggestion will still work, unless you can't be bothered trying it.

 

Brendon

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do you solve it ?

 

Solve what?All possible solution were given

Edited by myguggi

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My question on the VHS to DVD forum was concerning using the video DVD as backup storage (DVDs that work in a DVD player). The question was "can a video DVD be copied back to a hard drive?"

 

My question on this forum is whether a data DVD can be made from 8 GB mpeg files. The data DVD would be used as backup storage.

 

I'm trying to use DVDs as a backup to the mpeg files on my hard drive. If the hard drive is lost, then use the DVDs to re-populate a new hard drive.

 

A guy at work suggested Zip compress the 8 GB mpeg files and then burn a data DVD disc. But my computer gives an error message because the compressed file is too large.

FIRST TIME Posting ... hope I do it correctly?? ... Sometimes, it's the simple things that are hard .. :)

You want to make Backups of your videos in case your hard drive corrupts or something. Putting those videos on a DVD as data rather than as a playable Video DVD isn't the best way to save the videos as the size will remain the same either way and use a lot of dvds. Best way to do what you want is to get a 17 gigabyte stick from Walmart or someplace .. You can get one for 18 dollars or less. You can put the videos on it and whenever you need to replace them on your hard drive just put the stick back into the usb port and open it in Windows explorer where you can drag them back off the stick and into your computer. An even better solution for video backup is to get another hard drive just for that purpose. I got a 500 gig drive for 50 bucks at Walmart and put all my backup videos on it and then unplugged it from the computer. Next time my computer gets corrupt all I have to do after fixing it is plug that *extra* hard drive back in and there are all my videos.

Edited by shinobi

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FIRST TIME Posting ... hope I do it correctly?? ... Sometimes, it's the simple things that are hard .. :)

You want to make Backups of your videos in case your hard drive corrupts or something. Putting those videos on a DVD as data rather than as a playable Video DVD isn't the best way to save the videos as the size will remain the same either way and use a lot of dvds. Best way to do what you want is to get a 17 gigabyte stick from Walmart or someplace .. You can get one for 18 dollars or less. You can put the videos on it and whenever you need to replace them on your hard drive just put the stick back into the usb port and open it in Windows explorer where you can drag them back off the stick and into your computer. An even better solution for video backup is to get another hard drive just for that purpose. I got a 500 gig drive for 50 bucks at Walmart and put all my backup videos on it and then unplugged it from the computer. Next time my computer gets corrupt all I have to do after fixing it is plug that *extra* hard drive back in and there are all my videos.

That is another way but not necessarily the best...

 

Optical Media is, for all practical purposes, premanent...

 

The "sticks" you refer to require a charge in order to retain the data. Now they are long lived between uses, but can deteriorate and are susceptible to static charges. The cards only come in even GB sizes with 16 GB from $20 for No Name to $50 for good brand name. 32 GB cards are more... (SOURCE)

 

A DVD Movie is compressed, whereas the raw capture is not, lending itself to better quality potential ;)

 

Your suggestion is not a bad one, just needs some qualifiers :lol: Not at all bad for a 'first post', just don't be so shy with the Carrage Return - no extra charge for the lines you use ;)

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That is another way but not necessarily the best...

 

Optical Media is, for all practical purposes, premanent...

 

Perhaps not as "premanent" as some people think. While the Optical Storage Technology Association (OSTA) has published longevity estimates by manufacturers of up to 5-10 years for unrecorded CDs and 30-100 years for recorded DVD+/-Rs, the report of the "NIST/LoC Optical Media Longevity Study" [1] said that while virtually all CD-Rs tested gave an estimated life expectancy of >15 years, "Only 47 percent of the recordable DVDs tested indicated an estimated life expectancy beyond 15 years. Some had a predicted life expectancy as short as 1.9 years."

 

Given those figures, Shinobi's suggestion takes on renewed vigor, and if one is using optical media one should perhaps stick to CDs with their life expectancy greater than 15 years.

 

Regards,

Brendon

 

 

 

[1] Olson, Nels and Zheng, Jian. "NIST/LoC Final Report to ODAT." Presentation to the 30 January 2007 meeting of the Government Information Preservation Working Group (GIPWoG).

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But without knowing the "life expectancy" of memory cards, preferably by the the same testing lab, it cannot be recommended over anything :lol:

 

My own DVD's are reaching 10 years and some of my CD's are celebrating their 15th birthday... (real life vs artificial lab condition)

 

The only absolute failures I have seen are on those that were burned using exotic burn methods ~ Win Zip, Span Disc, Backup, etc. :(

 

All those burned with Standard methods, have survived or given plenty of warning to be copied and burned to new media ~ These were burned as Standard Data Disc & DVD Movie.

 

(All of this is based on CD-R and DVD R media ~
RW's fail
and should never be used!!!)

I don't have too many CD-R's of old but 200+ DVD's burned from 10 years ago is a pretty solid base!

 

I still have 10 DVD disc's (5 double sided) from the original cakes I bought in 2002 (cdanteek will love these :lol: ):

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Unique Disc Identifier : [DVD-R:LD]

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Disc & Book Type : [DVD-R] - [DVD-R]

Manufacturer Name : [Lead Data Inc.]

Manufacturer ID : [LD]

Blank Disc Capacity : [2,298,496 Sectors = 4.71 GB (4.38 GiB)]

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

[ DVD Identifier V5.2.0 -
]

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

And I have some SmartMedia memory cards going back 9 years... none have failed but I can't really check contents as they 'recharge' anytime you put them in a Reader :(

 

I think the short life claims by labs such as these have already been debunked in the real world by the complete lack of postings by users who need help recovering their failed disc :huh: There just not there...

 

Wasn't there a Meteorologist who wrote a paper explaining why it was impossible for a Hurricane to be in the Gulf of Mexico...

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I think the short life claims by labs such as these have already been debunked in the real world by the complete lack of postings by users who need help recovering their failed disc :huh: There just not there...

Accuracy of laboratory studies done to ISO 18927:2002 can hardly be considered 'debunked' by a lack of postings on a bulletin board by people who hope gurus can magically fix their failed discs.

 

In the real world I've personally dealt with numerous recorded DVDs which have failed after a couple of years of careful storage. Your own discs which gave 'plenty of warning to be copied' ultimately failed. Remember, if all the data on a disc cannot be retrieved without loss, the disc has failed.

 

I'm not asking you or the other readers here to believe any particular set of figures from the wildly varying estimates that are bruited round the market. The point I'm making is that while the true life expectancy of optical media is unknown [and perhaps unknowable] it is definitely not "permanent" and in many cases is way shorter than people think.

 

Regards,

Brendon

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These would be the same ones that assured everyone that the speed of sound could not be exceeded until Chuck Yeager did it??? Or that a Gorilla did not exist? Or... the list goes on.

 

Bad Science is still just bad science even when it is published on the web :lol:

 

I'll take reality over theory every time :lol:

 

Do you have anything that indicates these memory cards have any life span?

 

Otherwise it is just something that we do not see eye to eye on ;) I can live with that.

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Optical Media is, for all practical purposes, premanent...

 

 

Jim, you know Roxio experienced failure with installation disc's this year failing due to fact that the installation disc was a burned disc instead of a pressed disc!

 

http://forums.support.roxio.com/topic/79188-creator-2012-will-not-install-onto-win-7-x64/page__view__findpost__p__395897

 

I would love to have one of those failing burned installation disc's and show you the pretty colored graph it would make! :lol:

 

Fact, media will fail especially poor media.

 

These are Media ID MCC 003 a Verbatim media code faked or given with permission to CMC Magnetics Corporation that made the TDK DVD +R disc's I bought back in 2003/2004 at Staples. Most failed in 3 to 5 years I bought a 100.. :rolleyes:

 

Back then, 2003/2004 I also experimented with K-Hypermedia DVD media probably made by CMC Magnetics Corporation. I burned 30 to 40 and not one has failed to date. Talk about quality control!

 

I might add some DVD settop players will play a failing disc or a disc with high PI Errors and PI Failures better than other players. A DVD PC drive/burner with also play some disc's with high PI Errors and PI Failures than most settop players will.

 

 

http://www.cmcdisc.com/index.htm

 

post-97-075572900 1327871618.png

 

post-97-089180500 1327871436.png

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Hug your numbers, if it gives you comfort...

 

We have had this conversation before... nothing has changed ;)

 

 

Likewise, hug your "Optical Media is, for all practical purposes, premanent..." if it gives you comfort! :lol:

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I'll take reality over theory every time :lol:

 

Do you have anything that indicates these memory cards have any life span?

 

Otherwise it is just something that we do not see eye to eye on ;) I can live with that.

I wasn't talking about memory cards, Jim. I was debating your statement that

Optical Media is, for all practical purposes, premanent...

 

The reality as I showed, is that optical media is NOT, for all practical purposes, permanent.

 

Do we still differ on that statement?

 

Regards,

Brendon

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No... not going to be drawn into some sort of a word picking contest :lol:

 

We will agree to disagree on this, as we did before, and leave it at that rather than carry this debate to death's door :lol::D:lol:

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Shinobi,

 

Thank you very much for your first post.

 

It sparked an interesting look into the value of fondly cherished beliefs vs. observed facts in real life.

 

:lol:

 

Regards,

Brendon

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