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Upgrading From Win Xp Pro To Win 7 Pro

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I will be upgrading my computer within the near future from XP Pro to Win 7 Pro. I know that the hard drive will be wiped clean upon performing the upgrade and that the files one wishes to retain will need to be copied to an external drive. Any recommendations about any software to use to move these files?

 

What needs to be done to successfully reinstall Roxio Creator 2011? Does Roxio Creator 2011 have to be uninstalled prior to the upgrade? Will I have to contact Roxio to inform them of the change in operating system? I have a physical disc of the software. Any suggestions/precautions about files related to compositions created within Roxio Creator 2011? The files in question are from projects already completed, but which I would like to retain for future use and possible modification.

 

Thanks for any help.

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I will be upgrading my computer within the near future from XP Pro to Win 7 Pro. I know that the hard drive will be wiped clean upon performing the upgrade and that the files one wishes to retain will need to be copied to an external drive. Any recommendations about any software to use to move these files?

 

What needs to be done to successfully reinstall Roxio Creator 2011? Does Roxio Creator 2011 have to be uninstalled prior to the upgrade? Will I have to contact Roxio to inform them of the change in operating system? I have a physical disc of the software. Any suggestions/precautions about files related to compositions created within Roxio Creator 2011? The files in question are from projects already completed, but which I would like to retain for future use and possible modification.

 

Thanks for any help.

 

You don't need any software to copy files from point A to point B. Use My Computer. Go to the folder(s) that you want to copy. Select it (them), click on Copy. Then, go to your external drive, and paste them.

 

To successfully install Creator 2011, on your newly formatted drive, shut off your virus software, make sure you don't have any programs running, put in your disc, and install the software.

 

If you are going to format your hard drive, there is no need to uninstall anything..

 

You don't have to contact Roxio.

 

Make sure that you have copied your productions (compositions), to a like location on your newly formatted hard drive.

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One easy way is to have a USB flash drive handy and safe all of your personal files to it (size needed will depend on how large all your saved files are). After you have saved all of your personal files you can then format the HD that XP was installed on. BTW, don't forget to safe your emails if needed and any other special files. 1--have your C2011 installation disk with key code ready 2--No, Roxio C2011 does not have to be uninstalled prior to upgrade 3--No you will not have to contact or inform Roxio of your new OS (W7 Pro) 4--As suggested above, be sure and save all of your previously produced Roxio C2011 files including all photos, videos etc. (Any DMSM and DMSD files as well).

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I will let all know how the upgrade goes. It won't be right away.

 

While performing due diligence in preparation of the upgrade, one website that was visited suggested an alternative method of upgrade. Install Win 7 pro on a different harddrive and be able to toggle between XP pro and Win 7 pro. This eliminates the need to transfer the XP files to the new harddrive. My computer has the capability for another harddrive. First, does it make sense to do this, and are there any pitfalls? Secondly, can it be done when the current XP pro is operating at 32-bit, while the Win 7 pro upgrade will operate at 64-bit? I did check with the tech person at the store where the computer was purchased to determine if my computer system is 32-bit or 64-bit (the computer specs also indicate it is a 64-bit system). He assured me that it is a 64-bit system. He continued to explain that when it was downgraded to Win Xp, it changed to a 32-bit operating system. If adding a second harddrive in which to install Win 7 pro can be successfully done, and it makes logical sense, wouldn't it be essentially like starting out with a new computer?

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I will let all know how the upgrade goes. It won't be right away.

 

While performing due diligence in preparation of the upgrade, one website that was visited suggested an alternative method of upgrade. Install Win 7 pro on a different harddrive and be able to toggle between XP pro and Win 7 pro. This eliminates the need to transfer the XP files to the new harddrive. My computer has the capability for another harddrive. First, does it make sense to do this, and are there any pitfalls? Secondly, can it be done when the current XP pro is operating at 32-bit, while the Win 7 pro upgrade will operate at 64-bit? I did check with the tech person at the store where the computer was purchased to determine if my computer system is 32-bit or 64-bit (the computer specs also indicate it is a 64-bit system). He assured me that it is a 64-bit system. He continued to explain that when it was downgraded to Win Xp, it changed to a 32-bit operating system. If adding a second harddrive in which to install Win 7 pro can be successfully done, and it makes logical sense, wouldn't it be essentially like starting out with a new computer?

 

What do you mean by "eliminates the need to transfer the XP files to the new harddrive"? If you install W7 then there are no XP files involved.

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one website that was visited suggested an alternative method of upgrade. Install Win 7 pro on a different harddrive and be able to toggle between XP pro and Win 7 pro.

 

Several of us do that with different Operating Systems.

 

I always use separate hard drives for different Operating Systems only way I will dual boot.

 

You need to disconnect all other hard drives except the one your going to install the other Operating Systems. When done the others can be connected and depending on your mother board different ways to boot into the OS you want.

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I do the same as Cdanteek.

 

I disconnected my XP drive and installed Windows 7 on a second drive. Then I reconnected the first drive again.

 

The reason for disconnecting all other drives when installing Windows is to keep them independent. When a version of Windows is being installed, it wants to be able to control everything it can see.

 

Now I can choose to boot into XP or Windows 7, and I make the choice, not Windows. One can be 32-bit and the other 64-bit - it doesn't matter.

 

This way, either Windows can see all data on both drives. Remember though, that each Operating System has its own registry and drivers, and big programs or suites which use these can only be run under the Operating System they were installed under.

e.g. if you install Creator under Win 7, you'll need to boot into Win 7 to run Creator although you can store the data on either drive.

 

Regards,

Brendon

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Okay, so I install a second harddrive to my computer. Prior to installing Win 7 pro, the original harddrive is disconnected from the computer. Then Win 7 pro is installed on this second harddrive. How does one select which operating system is to be used? Do you need to create a new user account? The new one for Win 7, while the current one remains for Win XP? Otherwise, it would seem that if the computer is started in one or the other operating system, once in that system you could not open the other without conflict. Can anyone point me to a website that provides step by step instructions for doing this procedure?

 

It is also stated that either Windows operating system can see all data on both drives. This seems to infer that the data seen on each harddrive, by one or the other operating system, can be accessed and used. If so, does this mean that the current files (not programs) in Win XP do not need to be transferred to an external harddrive as they would need to be when only one harddrive is available?

 

As is obvious, this is new ground to me.

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How does one select which operating system is to be used?

 

During startup or a bios setting.

 

Do you need to create a new user account? The new one for Win 7, while the current one remains for Win XP?

 

If you want to.

 

Can anyone point me to a website that provides step by step instructions for doing this procedure?

 

Google is your friend.

 

 

 

It is also stated that either Windows operating system can see all data on both drives. This seems to infer that the data seen on each harddrive, by one or the other operating system, can be accessed and used. If so, does this mean that the current files (not programs) in Win XP do not need to be transferred to an external harddrive as they would need to be when only one harddrive is available?

 

Each installed on a separate hard drive with the other disconnected they are separate and all data on each drive is accessible while using the other OS.

 

I only keep programs on the OS hard drive, everything else is kept on storage drives.

 

Example below while in W-8 I can access W-7 drive and data.

 

post-97-0-66184600-1384124688_thumb.jpg

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How does one select which operating system is to be used? Do you need to create a new user account? The new one for Win 7, while the current one remains for Win XP? Otherwise, it would seem that if the computer is started in one or the other operating system, once in that system you could not open the other without conflict

 

On my machine I select the bootable drive via my BIOS, and the machine always boots on that drive until I select a different one.

On some other machines you can use F12 or another function key at startup to pick the drive you want to boot on, like Cdanteek said.

 

Since you only run one Operating System [OS] at a time, there's no need for more than one account per OS. If you need something that's installed on another OS, you reboot and start in the other OS.

 

It is also stated that either Windows operating system can see all data on both drives. This seems to infer that the data seen on each harddrive, by one or the other operating system, can be accessed and used. If so, does this mean that the current files (not programs) in Win XP do not need to be transferred to an external harddrive as they would need to be when only one harddrive is available?

 

Yes, that's correct. I do a lot of experimenting on my system, and it currently has 4 bootable drives attached. If you look at this picture the bootable drives are:

[1] C: the work system with XP

[2] I: Win 7 with NXT pro

[3] P: XP with NXT 2 Pro

[4] S: Win 7 with Creator 2012

 

The other drive letters are non-bootable data partitions that any OS can access or share.

 

post-208-0-63724300-1384156320_thumb.jpg

 

When I boot on drive 2, 3, or 4, that drive takes letter C: and my XP work system takes drive letter I:, P:, or S:. The other drive letters stay the same. It's very handy and quite automatic once I set it up.

 

Regards,

Brendon

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Wow! There's more to this than I may be capable of doing. Have to study what's been offered before plunging into this project. The screen shots are very informative and helpful. In any event, thanks for all of your help.

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One of the responses to my question about step by step installation instructions was, "Google is your friend." I'm not so sure after Googling, "How to install Win 7 Pro on a second harddrive. Most of the information was inadequate and some included issues that were encountered doing the procedure. Such as, the computer not being able to recognize the other drive even after disconnecting the OEM drive before installing Win 7. In any event, will continue to pursue installing Win 7 on a secondary harddrive. It seems like it provides the best of two worlds. Also am not anxious to navigate away from Win XP because some of the programs I still use do not appear to be compatible with Win 7.

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One of the responses to my question about step by step installation instructions was, "Google is your friend." I'm not so sure after Googling, "How to install Win 7 Pro on a second harddrive. Most of the information was inadequate and some included issues that were encountered doing the procedure. Such as, the computer not being able to recognize the other drive even after disconnecting the OEM drive before installing Win 7. In any event, will continue to pursue installing Win 7 on a secondary harddrive. It seems like it provides the best of two worlds. Also am not anxious to navigate away from Win XP because some of the programs I still use do not appear to be compatible with Win 7.

 

When you buy a bare drive from a place like New-egg you need to install it and initialize it follow Or you can do it in computer management:

 

Excuse me outerbank, I said Google is your friend, I never said it wasn't work sifting through the info! You seem to want a step by step serve me on a silver spoon directions. We have no clue what box you own, hardware, and software you need installed!

 

Most of us here didn't follow a get computer savvy book that involved little or no research or work and taught us what years of doing, experimenting, and such did.

 

My advice don't do anything until you feel confident you know what your doing and how to do it correctly. Most of the questions your asking is minimal computer knowledge not anything technical.

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Geez! Don't get your dander up. I didn't think that the comment about Google would hurt your feelings. The fact of the matter is that yes, one needs to do their homework, which should be evident in that I chose to ask questions on this forum before proceeding with the described changes. The reality is that a lot of the info on Google is deficient and often conflicting among the many commentors. If you wish, I'll apologize for not knowing enough about computers to satisfy your criteria. Evidently, you have established in your mind how much a person ought to know about computers before they dare ask questions. I also like the "put-down" comment in your closing sentence. You're very helpful to many people that have questions, including myself. I'm not sure sarcastic comments are needed.

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No dander no hurt feelings.

 

My closing comment was reality and not meant as a put down. Sorry you took it as such.

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My plans to install a second hard drive for a dual boot computer having Win 7 installed on the new hard drive, while keeping Win XP on the original drive has been somewhat altered. Have learned that the software disc that came with the computer only permits one operating system to be used. That is, the product key allows either Win XP or Win 7 to be used, but not both. I now have to decide if it is worthwhile purchasing Win 7 Pro software and a hard drive. There is another possible option. The tech department where the computer was purchased says that Win 7 Pro can be operated in XP mode which allows the computer to still use the software programs that are already on the computer. Of course, I understand that the data files will need to be moved to an external storage device and the software programs will have to be reinstalled. I would like to know if anyone has used this XP mode within Win 7, and how effectively it functions? The current plans are to only install Roxio Creator 2011 within the Win 7 Pro operating system where it will be used. From what I gather, because Win 7 pro operating system will be a 64-bit system, Creator 2011 should operate faster.

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Have learned that the software disc that came with the computer only permits one operating system to be used. That is, the product key allows either Win XP or Win 7 to be used, but not both.

 

What software disc? Where did you read the bold text above? Post a link please?

 

What brand , make, and model of PC?

 

I thought we explained you don't do anything with the XP drive but unhook it and after W-7 is installed on a new drive reconnect the XP drive.

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The brand computer is PowerSpec. It was purchased from Microcenter. The software disc was provided with this same computer when purchased. Again, the disc was used to downgrade to Win XP from Win 7 Pro. The computer originally came with Win 7 Pro installed. The label on the disc indicates the following: Microsoft, Windows 7 Professional; This disc contains 64-bit software only; For distribution only with a new Micro Electronics, Inc. PC.

 

Yes, I do know that the OEM hard drive would need to be disconnected if I choose to purchase both another hard drive and Win 7 Pro software for this new hard drive. However, as explained in the prior posting, I have learned that the software disc provided with the computer only permits one operating system to be used at a time, not both. Consequently, I would have to buy a new Win 7 Pro software program. This information was provided by the tech department at Microcenter after I e-mailed the question about installing Win 7 Pro on a separate hard drive using the software disc provided with the computer. Presumably, if I were to attempt installing Win 7 Pro on the new hard drive from this disc, at some point a pop-up may appear telling me that it cannot be installed because it has already been registered as using Win XP Pro. In any event, as described in my prior posting, there is the option of upgrading to Win 7 Pro on my current computer's hard drive which will be wiped clean sunsequent to the upgrade. Consequently, this requires that the data files must be transferred to an external storage device before upgrade so that they can be restored to the computer thereafter. Of course, all the software programs would need to be reinstalled.

 

As described in the prior posting, it was also learned that after upgrading to Win 7 Pro to the original hard drive, Win 7 Pro has the feature of being able to operate in an XP mode allowing access and operation of the old software and data files. Hence, the question as to whether anyone has the experience of using Win 7 in XP mode. Does it work? Does it work effectively?

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I suggest it is pretty clear what cd and Brendon are trying to explain, But as they also suggested we really don't know enough information

about your particular computer to suggest any better steps to take. Like---

 

Is your hard drives new or brand new ? If brand new be sure and take the steps cd suggested in the latter part of cd's post # 15 , first sentence

If you have disconnected all other drives except the one you want to install W7 on, just place the W7 OS disk in your DVD drive and install as suggested.

After that and you get in installed properly, you might want to go to your BIOS setup and make sure that the "BOOT UP" list shows that particular drive

as the first drive to boot to.

 

Now if you want to have XP as your boot drive then you need to disconnect all drives (including the one you just installed W7 on and only have the drive

you want XP installed on live. Then just go through the same steps as with the W7 installation to get XP install with it's OS disk.

 

Now to boot to which ever drive you want (XP OR W7) you will probably need to go to your BIOS setup and choose the drive (XP or W7)you want to boot to

as the first boot device each time you boot up.

After you have installed BOTH OS's (XP and W7) hook up BOTH drives and then boot to the OS you want.

 

(Those of us that have Asus MB's (Usually custom builds)you can click on the F8 key at start of boot which will give you a screen that has choices of what drive to want to boot from)

Hope that helps. If not please consider posting a screen shot as cd suggested in post #19. If I am going over steps that CD and Brendon have already suggested

excuse my repeats.

 

 

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"As described in the prior posting, it was also learned that after upgrading to Win 7 Pro to the original hard drive, Win 7 Pro has the feature of being able to operate in an XP mode allowing access and operation of the old software and data files. Hence, the question as to whether anyone has the experience of using Win 7 in XP mode. Does it work? Does it work effectively? "

 

The above statement does NOT mean that you can operate in BOTH OS's. It just means that one can use programs that were installed in XP when you use the option of XP Mode.

 

 

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From the responses posted, it seems something has been lost in translation. I completely understand what cd has stated. here's what I attempted to get across.

 

There are two ways in which I can proceed. I can buy and install another hard drive in my computer. It would be new. My original plans were then to use the installation disc that was provided with the computer. This is the one with the label previously described. I have since learned that since I used this disc to downgrade to XP Pro, I cannot use this disc to install Win 7 Pro on another hard drive. Evidently, the product key does not allow the utilization of both operating systems. Therefore, if I go the route described, I would have to buy a new Win 7 Pro software package. The other option is to upgrade my current operating system from XP Pro to Win 7 Pro using the software disc provided with the computer. Microsoft provides a download utility for Win 7 Pro that allows Win 7 Pro to operate in XP mode. So I do understand that it will not be possible to operate both Win 7 and XP at the same time. I get it. All I really wanted to know is if anyone has experience operating Win 7Pro in the XP mode. Most likely I'll bite the bullet and buy the new hard drive and new Win 7 software package and go the original route.

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I wouldn't do that, I would run both OS"S and dual boot.

 

Designed primarily with small- and medium-sized businesses in mind, Windows XP Mode comes as a separate download and works only with Windows 7 Professional, Ultimate, and Enterprise. Windows XP Mode also requires virtualization software such as Windows Virtual PC. Both are available free on the Microsoft website.

 

http://windows.micro...windows-xp-mode

 

I have learned that the software disc provided with the computer only permits one operating system to be used at a time, not both.

 

Your only using one operating system at a time on seperate hard drives on the same PC.

 

I would try it first with a new hard drive if it fails to install (?) you can buy W-7 software. Worth a shoot IMO.

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Decided to speak to the technician that has worked on my computer in the past. I asked about running Win 7 in XP mode. He also did not recommend doing it because it really slows down the operation of the computer. I do plan to go ahead and install a second hard drive in the computer and attempt to install Win 7 Pro from the disc I have on the second hard drive. Will let you know the outcome.

 

Thanks again for all the help and guidance.

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Thanks again for all the help and guidance.

 

If there's any particular information we can give or get for you, please just ask.

 

Regards,

Brendon

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