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Istari

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About Istari

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  1. Istari

    Toast 14 Not Working On Mac

    If that's the case... complete failure on the part of Roxio to not take OS security features into account and work with them instead of against them. Having to turn off security features in order for an app to work isn't an acceptable long-term solution.
  2. Istari

    Toast 14 Problem

    Not using Toast anymore myself (gave up after the issues with 12 that apparently still haven't been fixed), but... if you can have it create a disc image file instead of using the optical drive, you should be able to either open the disc image file with Disk Utility (Yosemite and earlier) or right click the disc image file and "Burn... to disc" in the Finder (El Capitan, and likely later).
  3. Istari

    Best Workflow? Fcpx > Toast 14 Pro Bluray

    Personally, for "standard DVDs" I'm using the outdated, obsolete, but yet otherwise surprisingly still working FCS3 on El Capitan along with the current version of Compressor. Still using chapter marks in FCP, export as a Quick Time (reference) movie, using the export option of "DVD Studio Pro markers". Those are picked up by Compressor during import, then I pull the resulting .m2v and .ac3 files from Compressor into DSP, and when I'm ready to create a disc, I have DSP create a disc image file, and then just right click and "Burn... to disc" in the Finder. I haven't yet seen FCPX myself (wasn't aware it could do image files o_O), but I'm guessing that you could do something similar, up to the point of creating the disc image file (which Compressor can do, but with very limited menu options, which is why I'm still using DSP). Once you have the disc image file, you don't need any other apps. Re: Blu-ray discs, I'm using the same exact process, but leaving DSP out of the equation (since it only works with DVDs), and using Compressor to create a Blu-ray disc image file. After that, same process of right click on the disc image file, etc.
  4. Effectively a repost of my question re: Toast 14, which was never answered. I bought Toast 12 about a year or so ago (and apparently right before Toast 14 was released), and at the time there was an issue with the "Reencoding: Never" setting when creating a Blu-ray disc that, if you had encoded video as H.264, it would attempt to re-encode anyway - and "never" finish (read as: after 24+ hours I gave up). The "workaround" for Toast 12 was to encode as MPEG-2, which appeared to work - but Roxio appeared to ignore the issue and move on to Toast 14. Is anyone currently using Toast 15 to burn H.264 encoded video using the "Reencoding: Never" setting - and does that actually work within a "reasonable" amount of time (read as: close to actual running time of content, but not more than double; e.g. no more than 4 hours for a 2 hour running time)? Separate but related, looks like there's already complaints/issues in this forum about Toast 15 on both Yosemite and El Capitan. How "stable" is the latest build of the app on El Capitan 10.11.5 (or 10.11.6 for that matter)? Someone I know is asking me about whether they should get the Blu-ray plug-in for their copy of Toast 11, or upgrade to Toast 15... and I'm wondering whether they should bother with either. Personally, I've only used Toast 12 with the Blu-ray plug-in to make a single Blu-ray project with multiple tracks/titles because Compressor can't do that; but otherwise, all my projects are single track/title and I just use Compressor (as it's both stable and easier for me). Toast doesn't otherwise appear to provide any additional "features" for creating Blu-ray discs that Compressor doesn't cover (and both appear to be severely limited when comparing Blu-ray menus to DVD menu features, but that's another topic entirely). Based on the complaint/issue posts in this forum, I'd be hesitant to buy any version of Toast until after a) macOS Sierra is released in the fall and Roxio updates Toast accordingly - and fixes the existing issues (just in case there was any question about that, eh?). It otherwise appears to be a "dead" product that Roxio keeps "poking" just to sell more copies (*cough* cash grab *cough*) without actually fixing issues between releases.
  5. Istari

    Toast 14 Says Project Is Too Large To Burn Dvd-Video

    Here's some potentially really dumb questions... Could it be referring to the amount of storage on your boot device, and not the recordable disc? I know that some built-in functionality in OS X requires sufficient space on the boot device in order to "stage" content prior to burning (e.g. if you were to burn a 4GB folder to disc, it would probably need *at least* 4GB to "stage" a disc image file prior to burning it). Or, could Toast be trying to re-encode the VIDEO_TS folders prior to burn, using (significantly?) less compression than how they're currently encoded? *If* that were the case, needing 14GB of storage to stage a disc with a final size of 4.38GB sounds plausible - depending on the running time of the source media and whatever encoding settings it's trying to use (almost sounds like it may be looking for ~1GB per VIDEO_TS folder, plus ~4GB to create a disc image file to be burned to disc). Alternatively, if it's trying to re-encode the VIDEO_TS folders, the resulting output could potentially come out to ~14GB, in which case trying to change settings to "Reencoding: Never" might help (if it works at all; see my related topic/post).
  6. I bought Toast 12 about a year or so ago (and apparently right before Toast 14 was released), and at the time there was an issue with the "Reencoding: Never" setting when creating a Blu-ray disc that, if you had encoded video as H.264, it would attempt to re-encode anyway - and "never" finish (read as: after 24+ hours I gave up). The "workaround" for Toast 12 was to encode as MPEG-2, which appeared to work - but Roxio appeared to ignore the issue and move on to Toast 14. Is anyone currently using Toast 14 to burn H.264 encoded video using the "Reencoding: Never" setting - and does that actually work within a "reasonable" amount of time (read as: close to actual running time of content, but not more than double; e.g. no more than 4 hours for a 2 hour running time)? Separate but related, I've seen a pile of complaints/issues in this forum about Toast 14 on El Capitan. How "stable" is the latest build of the app (Toast 14.1?) on El Capitan 10.11.5? Someone I know is asking me about whether they should get the Blu-ray plug-in for their copy of Toast 11, or upgrade to Toast 14... and I'm wondering whether they should bother with either. Personally, I've only used Toast 12 with the Blu-ray plug-in to make a single Blu-ray project with multiple tracks/titles because Compressor can't do that; but otherwise, all my projects are single track/title and I just use Compressor (as it's both stable and easier for me). Toast doesn't otherwise appear to provide any additional "features" for creating Blu-ray discs that Compressor doesn't cover (and both appear to be severely limited when comparing Blu-ray menus to DVD menu features, but that's another topic entirely). I'm also suspecting by all the recent e-mail spam from Roxio re: Toast 14 on sale that a newer release may be imminent (seems to be an annual "thing"). Based on the complaint/issue posts in this forum, I'd be hesitant to buy any version of Toast until after a) macOS Sierra is released in the fall and Roxio updates Toast accordingly. It otherwise appears to be a "dead" product that Roxio keeps "poking" just to sell more copies without actually fixing issues between releases.
  7. Istari

    Toast 14 Not Working On Mac

    I wouldn't be, either; never had someone in a tech support role ask for that to troubleshoot their own app. Given both the track record you described of not answering e-mail, and the apparent track record of issues with Toast that go unresolved,... sorry, but I wouldn't trust 'em. I'd rather stop using the app and find another solution (oh, wait, I did that)... Personally, for Blu-ray, I use Compressor to create a disk image file and then Finder (used to be Disk Utility before El Capitan) to burn the image to disc. For DVD, I'm (still, surprisingly) using DVD Studio Pro (yes, I know it's "ancient" from a support perspective). I tried Toast a year or two ago (can't remember how long, but it was Toast 12), mainly for a project where I wanted more than one track/title on a Blu-ray (which Compressor can't do). It worked, but I had to first encode as MPEG-2 instead of H.264 as Toast 12 is broken with regard to the "never re-encode" option with H.264 (tries to re-encode anyway, but after ~24+ hours, the job is still running - never bothered to waste the time to see if it would ever complete at all).
  8. Istari

    Creating A Blu Ray From An Imovie Project

    Hmmm... someone more familiar with this may have a better answer, but it almost sounds like you somehow created a QuickTime "reference movie" from iMovie that doesn't contain the actual movie, but rather references to the files that do - and perhaps Toast doesn't know how to handle that. I don't normally use iMovie myself (prefer FCP), but... perhaps you need to export the movie first in a format that Toast knows what to do with?
  9. Istari

    Toast 14 Announced

    Oddly enough, I'm in the middle of a project for which I would've liked to have had the "alleged" menu options... and I haven't otherwise finalized duplication. I'm *tempted* to pick up 14 Pro, cross my fingers, and hope/pray that it won't be a(nother) waste of time, effort, and money. My FCS2/FCS3 install still appears to be stable on OS X 10.10.3, but I cringe every time I look at a Blu-ray menu with less "creativity" than I can get with DSP.
  10. Istari

    Upgrade From Toast 8 To Toast 12

    Aye, not surprised that they skipped from 12 to 14; guess they're actually superstitious enough to avoid a release number of 13. Out of curiosity, I thought to check Wikipedia to find out when Toast 12 was released; somewhat surprisingly, although the page was "last modified on 28 April 2015, at 12:53", it notes that the "stable release" was considered to be 11.2.0. Granted the page is not likely maintained by anyone at Corel/Roxio, but still somewhat amusing/interesting that... for a product released close to a year ago (based on what appear to be the oldest entries in this forum), the most recent edit from ~2 months ago didn't consider changing the "stable release" to 12.x. The release of 14 now somewhat explains why the bugs in 12 haven't been addressed; seems they've abandoned it and moved on.
  11. Istari

    Font Size In Menu

    Nice; wasn't aware of this - thanks for the info. Haven't tried it yet myself, but at least now I know where to look. Btw, I didn't find them in my user "~/Library/Application Support" folder, but rather in the system "/Library/Application Support/Roxio/Toast Menu Styles" folder.
  12. Istari

    Cannot Burn Dvd With Toast 12 - Ok W/ Toast 6 Lite (?)

    I had to go back and re-read your original post... so, I'm guessing that you're using Toast 12 and changed the destination to be a disc image file,... which is probably sitting on your Mac somewhere with a filename extension of ".toast"? I'm not familiar with how to use Toast to make discs from disc image files, but it can be done with Disk Utility (which is what I normally use for such things). If you double-click the file, it should mount the disc image. From there, you could run Disk Utility, select your file from the list of mounted disc images on the left, and then click the "Burn" button in the toolbar; insert a blank disc, and Disk Utility will check it and say "Ready to burn" - at which point, click "Burn". Hope that helps...
  13. Istari

    Cannot Burn Dvd With Toast 12 - Ok W/ Toast 6 Lite (?)

    Hmmm... sounds like the info from the "iMovie Library" in the Movies folder (I didn't know it created one, but I should've expected it; similar behavior to iPhoto and iTunes to have its own "library folder"); as such, that's just a collection of files, and not just one specific exported file. In order to try this myself, to get an individual file/movie as the output, I had to be in iMovie (specifically on the Library tab of the window), go to the File menu -> Share -> "File...", give it some info about the movie, click "Next...", then give the file a name and choose where to write it (sounds like you used the Desktop; I tend to follow the default folders and used my Movies folder). When that finally completed, I went out to the Finder, opened a new window, selected the Movies folder in the sidebar, located the file, selected it, and did a "Command-I" ("Get Info") on the movie file itself. Based on how I had it set up, under "General" it reported "Kind: MPEG-4 movie"; under "More Info", it reported: Dimensions: 1920x1080 Codecs: AAC, H.264 Color profile: HD (1-1-1) Duration: 02:34 Audio channels: 2 So, to make a long story short ("too late!"),... when you were in iMovie, did you use the File menu -> Share -> "File..." method to write your movie to a standalone file,... or did you just track down your "iMovie Library" and try to bring that into Toast? If the latter, I'm guessing that Toast has no clue how the "iMovie Library" is organized (and doesn't care, either); you probably have to "share" an individual movie to a file and then try to bring that into Toast. Good luck...
  14. Istari

    New To Mac And Toast, How To Use

    Okay, I *think* I see what you're trying to accomplish; correct me if I'm wrong, but it looks like you want to make a backup copy of your Windows 7 install disc,... is that right? Is there a particular reason why it needs to be in "ISO" format? In any case, Toast appears to have a number of choices, depending on which may work for what you're trying to do. One would be to select the "Data" button in the main Toast window, choose "ISO 9660" from the drop-down menu in that window, "Select..." the (mounted) disc image, and then set the Destination to be "Disc Image". Another would be to select the "Copy" button in the main Toast window, set "Read From" to the (mounted) disc image, and then set the Destination to be "Disc Image". Not sure which of these, if either, would produce a disc image suitable for your purposes, as I don't normally work with ISO images. Personally, just for making a backup copy of a disc, I'd use Disk Utility, create a disc image file from the source, mount the disc image, and then use Disk Utility to burn the backup copy. Hope this helps.
  15. Istari

    Problems With Roxio Toast And Burning On A Mac

    Wow... I haven't seen a "buffer underrun" error in years - as in, back when creating your own disc was still a new concept. From what I recall, it was in reference to the system not being able to keep up with the write speed of the drive, although with newer/modern hardware, I wouldn't normally expect to see that. My personal preference when creating discs is to write a disc image file from the app, verify the disc image with an external player (e.g. the DVD Player app), and then use Disk Utility to burn the disc. Otherwise,... can you provide a bit more technical detail on your current setup? Mac model, OS X version, iMovie version, Toast version (guessing 12 since you posted in this forum), blank disc brand, type (DVD-R, DVD+R) and speed (8x, 16x), etc.?
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