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Seagate Ships Perpendicular Drive


The Highlander

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Seagate Ships Perpendicular Drive

 

Seagate on Tuesday began shipping its first notebook drive using perpendicular recording, which was first announced last June. By standing bits of data on end, rather than flat on the drive's surface, Seagate has achieved 160GB of storage in a 2.5-inch form factor.

 

Seagate's Momentus 5400.3 is not cheap, however, with a retail price of $325 USD. A 120GB model runs $240 USD, and a 7,200-RPM version is slated to follow later this year. Hard drives using parallel recording can store about 100 to 120 gigabits per square inch. With the new perpendicular method, drives can store 230 gigabits in the same space.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hey Neil, that's a coincidence, as I was just reading about these new optical drives in a new copy of PC Magazine. The way I understand it the old, or drives now, lay down a series of "chuck Holes" as I call them in a horizontal path, one after another, in the media layer material. Now with this new technique, they have all these "chuck Holes " standing in a vertical direction in the layer. Which means like you stated, you can have gobs more area to place these Chuck Holes----"Chuck Holes"---That's what they look like if you see the surface of a disk under a very powerful microscope. I wonder what you would see looking at these vertical ones ? It would almost have to be "3-D" huh ?

 

Frank........

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Frank,

 

I believe Seagate's innovation is to stack the magnetic domains on a hard drive on end, rather than the pits and lands of an optical drive. This technology allows them to get the bit density of a magnetic drive increased to allow more storage in a smaller space.

 

I think your PC Magazine article must have been talking about something else than Seagate's "perpendicular" recording of magnetic disks.

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