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'glitching' Videos - Help


TylahPlatt
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I began using our video camcorder to record the film from our old cassettes. Due to the provided plug sockets on our camcorder, we used a cord with 1 yellow plug, and 1 black plug, to connect to the yellow and either one of the red/white plugs on the Roxio USB. Both the audio and imagery were perfect, so we begun recording straight away and left in running for the full 3 hours of recorded video on the single cassette. Once all was recorded, I replayed sections of the recorded video and knew it wasn't right. Both the audio and film were glitchy and jumped annoyingly quick. I thought once altered with the audio and stabilisation options, and then exported, it would produce the video expected and would run completely smoothly. But evidently after the over-night export, the video quality remained the same.

 

Frustrated over all the time wasted, I thought to put that aside and experiment with an old home video VCR. Following all the right instructions (and double checking hoping we had a better outcome from the first), we connected the red, white and yellow cords from the VCR player into the Roxio USB. The audio sounded immediately, but the 'No Video Signal' message continued to flash, and did so for the whole 45 minutes we tried everything imaginable to enable the video source to connect. Giving up we thought to just try connect the cord with 1 yellow plug, and 1 black plug (originally used on the camcorder) to see what would happen. Remarkably it worked, both the audio and video connected successfully and we were able to begin recording from the VCR. However, once the VCR had finished and I was about to export, the same glitching and jumping audio/film was evident. By this point I had no idea what to possibly do, and was very frustrated by the thought I had wasted money on something thought to be such an awesome product.

 

Brainstorming on what we think we may not be doing right is the cord we are using. Obviously its 1 yellow plug matches perfect with the yellow plug on the USB, however the black plug we tend to just alternate with the red and white and hoped for the best. Each time though we found for whatever reason it worked perfectly fine, until the record button was hit of course and the video produced were simply jolting every few seconds and overall very unpleasant to watch.

 

Many thanks

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Please provide us with information on your computer via dxdiag.exe Follow these directions (link) There is no personal information except for what you called your computer. Yes, you can do it with W8 and 8.1 if the directions don't quite fit.

 

When did you last do maintenance on your computer - clean out temp and tmp files, get rid of programs you no loner need, defrag (unless you have a SSD). Are you saving to an internal drive or to a USB connected drive. Are you using the USB connection on the BACK of your computer (unless it is a laptop)?

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After reading both of your suggestions, I agree completely that the computer would have to be our biggest fault. I personally own an Apple MacBook, but our local OfficeWorks (Australia) store only supplies the Windows compatible VHS to DVD converter, therefore having to use our very outdated Windows family laptop. My dad is now it's only user so I know the last time we would've done a maintenance check would've be a good couple of years ago. I trialled saving on both an external hard drive and the laptops internal drive but found no difference, and as we used a laptop computer, we just plugged the USB into the side of the laptop. Our VCR also does not have a SCART connecter.

 

We have decided to refund our converter and invest in the Mac compatible version, as believed it will produce a much better outcome. I will attach a photo of the Yellow-Black cord and question if it would still be practical to use, once receiving the new product for my Macbook.

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That image simply looks like an extension cord - mono audio with video and a pretty cheap one. I'm guessing it is 6 ft long or so.

 

Invest in a new one as long as you are going to the store. Keep it as short as possible. No need for an expensive one. Buy one that has a "y" on the audio that plugs into the device so you can get simulated stereo (both left and right channels) -- Mono to stereo or buy a Y connector so you can make one yourself.

Edited by sknis
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