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Gar1138

What is the optimal format for video files to burn to Blue Ray?

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What is the optimal format for video files to burn to Blue Ray?

I edit in Premiere Pro and render in Adobe encoder.  In the past I used Adobes DVD burning software and always was under the impression that you should burn in Mpeg2 files. This splits the video and the audio in two different files that then need to be merged. It dose not look like there is a way of merging the files in Toast 17 or MyDVD Pro. So what format should I render my videos in? I tried a burn in them as .mp4 and the video turned out choppy. The audio plays smooth but the video was lagging like crazy. 

 

 

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I don’t really know the answer but I am speculating that both programs are re-encoding the video and thus making it smaller (size ways) and more choppy. 

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Depends on which app you want do the encoding. Movie DVDs require MPEG-2. It's what you set top player expects, and is the only format that works for a DVD. Movie Blu-ray disks use MPEG-4 (h.264).

What's probably happening is you're encoding the video twice. It's already compressed out of Media Encoder, and then Toast is compressing the compression. On top of that, bit rate is everything. You're either destroying the video in Media Encoder, Toast, or both.

These are the video settings I use in Media Encoder for Blu-ray (first image below).

The lower the bit rate, the choppier the video will be. Too high, and an older deck may not be able to decode it fast enough, causing the video to pause or stutter during playback.

Let's assume you're going to create your MPEG-4 file in Media Encoder. What you need to do in Toast then is tell it NOT to encode the video again. You've already done that. When assembling the final video in Toast (lower image), click on the Customize button, then the Encoding tab, and then click the Custom radio button. Just below the bit rate and motion sliders, change the Reencoding choice to Never. Click OK.

Toast should then just directly copy/store the already compressed video to the BDMV folder on the Blu-ray disk.

Screen Shot 1.png

Screen Shot 2.png

Edited by Kurt Lang

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