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Drag To Disk With Win Xp


jfgraczyk

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I just upgraded my computer to WinXP from Win2000. since then I am having problems with the drag to disk function. The computer keeps wanting to use the Windows CD-Rw copy function. Is Easy CD Creator not compatible with XP or is there a setting that I am missing. Please advise.

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You could try going to My Computer,right clicking on the drive,going to the recording tab and unchecking "Enable Cd recording on this drive".This should disable Windows Cd recording.

 

If you want to have both then it becomes a matter of timing with V6…

 

No disc or blank disc in the drive when you copy and XP Burning will take over.

 

D2D Formatted disc in the drive when you copy and D2D wins…

 

Of course just to add a little insanity to the issue, sometimes D2D just takes over!

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I just upgraded my computer to WinXP from Win2000. since then I am having problems with the drag to disk function. The computer keeps wanting to use the Windows CD-Rw copy function. Is Easy CD Creator not compatible with XP or is there a setting that I am missing. Please advise.

 

I wouldn't recommand ANY form of Packet-Writing. What it does best is permantly lose all data.

 

If you want to KEEP the data, NEVER format the disc. It is NOT like a magneticly-set floppy disc; it is an optical disc, and it is read by differentiating the height of the pits and lands.

 

For using optical media (CDs, DVDs), you are far better off with a Sessions-based program, whether you use Classic Creator or the WinXP built-in Sessions-based method.

 

You might check if any of your older Drag2Disc discs are still readable.

 

Using RW media is also asking for trouble - true, you can erase the entire disc and start over (making it good for testing purposes) but it will fade to blank on its own sooner or later - if formatted for Packet-Writing, usually sooner.

 

Lynn

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  • 4 weeks later...
I just upgraded my computer to WinXP from Win2000. since then I am having problems with the drag to disk function. The computer keeps wanting to use the Windows CD-Rw copy function. Is Easy CD Creator not compatible with XP or is there a setting that I am missing. Please advise.

 

I am having a similar problem. I upgraded to Windows XP and I have "No Recorder" showing in the D2D. I have tried just about everything on this forum. The one thing I find odd is I do not have the recorder tab on the DVD/CD writer drive.

 

Any help would be appreciated

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I am having a similar problem. I upgraded to Windows XP and I have "No Recorder" showing in the D2D. I have tried just about everything on this forum. The one thing I find odd is I do not have the recorder tab on the DVD/CD writer drive.

 

Any help would be appreciated

 

Look at the drive in Device Manager to see if it shows any errors.

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Thanks for your reply James. The disc drive is working properly and I have reinstalled the driver with all updates.

 

If the Recorder tab is missing from the drive Properties, it is not being correctly identified by XP. Roxio relies on XP to tell it about your burners.

 

I would suggest that you take these steps:

 

1. In Device Manager delete the burner.

 

2. From Regedit, remove the upper/lower filters.

After rebooting the drive should be detected and work correctly.

 

Upper/Lower Filters:

 

a. Click on Start --> Run --> and type in 'regedit' followed by the enter key

b. Expand the "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE" key (looks like a folder) by double clicking it (or clicking the "+" next to it.)

c. Expand the "SYSTEM" Key

d. Expand the "CurrentControlSet" Key

e. Expand the "Control" Key

f. Expand the "Class" Key

g. Please look for a key containing the following string of letter and numbers:

{4D36E965-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}

h. High light this key by left clicking once on it

i. On the right hand side you are looking for "UpperFilters" and "LowerFilters" under the "Name" column, once you find these please delete them by right clicking on them and choosing "delete"

j. Please exit the registry by clicking on the "X" in the top right hand corner of the screen

 

Reboot your computer

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If the Recorder tab is missing from the drive Properties, it is not being correctly identified by XP. Roxio relies on XP to tell it about your burners.

 

I would suggest that you take these steps:

 

1. In Device Manager delete the burner.

 

2. From Regedit, remove the upper/lower filters.

After rebooting the drive should be detected and work correctly.

 

Upper/Lower Filters:

 

a. Click on Start --> Run --> and type in 'regedit' followed by the enter key

b. Expand the "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE" key (looks like a folder) by double clicking it (or clicking the "+" next to it.)

c. Expand the "SYSTEM" Key

d. Expand the "CurrentControlSet" Key

e. Expand the "Control" Key

f. Expand the "Class" Key

g. Please look for a key containing the following string of letter and numbers:

{4D36E965-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}

h. High light this key by left clicking once on it

i. On the right hand side you are looking for "UpperFilters" and "LowerFilters" under the "Name" column, once you find these please delete them by right clicking on them and choosing "delete"

j. Please exit the registry by clicking on the "X" in the top right hand corner of the screen

 

Reboot your computer

 

Thank you for your reply, unfortunately this did not work either. :)

 

Is there anything else I can try?

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At this point I suggest you phone Tech Support. Too many possibilities to try to cover all of them…

 

An update to the problem. I tried creating a DVD in DVD Builder but it says there is no recorder. I uninstalled and reinstalled the drive and checked for driver updates, I have the most current. I have a HP DVD/CD Writer 200j and it shows as a "DVD/CD" writer until I put a blank DVD in the drive, then it changes to "CD ROM" in "My Computer". I have uninstalled Roxio 6 but when I try to reinstall Roxio it says I have the most current Drag to Disc, DVD Builder, etc. I am running Windows XP, upgraded from Windows Me. Everything was working fine before. I also have user accounts set up on XP and all are adminstrators.

 

What am I doing wrong?

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An update to the problem. I tried creating a DVD in DVD Builder but it says there is no recorder. I uninstalled and reinstalled the drive and checked for driver updates, I have the most current. I have a HP DVD/CD Writer 200j and it shows as a "DVD/CD" writer until I put a blank DVD in the drive, then it changes to "CD ROM" in "My Computer". I have uninstalled Roxio 6 but when I try to reinstall Roxio it says I have the most current Drag to Disc, DVD Builder, etc. I am running Windows XP, upgraded from Windows Me. Everything was working fine before. I also have user accounts set up on XP and all are adminstrators.

 

What am I doing wrong?

 

First, you "hijacked" a thread instead of starting your very own thread with your very own problem.

 

That is important because you "upgraded" from a Win9.x system (WinME) instead of a NTFS system (Win2000). That means you actually CHANGED systems from one working with FAT32 to one working with NTFS, a process which can "break" applications, because they need different files to work with NT File System than they did to work with File Allocation Table 32.

 

Have you uninstalled Roxio 6 via add/remove, run roxizap (URL is in the FREQUENT ANSWERS post pinned to the top of the Forum), and checked if that helped?

 

I tried googling HP DVD/CD Writer 200j, and there isn't a "perfect match", which means you have not given us the actual id string. A quick glance at the results offer the possibilites it uses plus media but not dash media; or that it might be a "combo" drive - that is, CD-RW/DVD-ROM - and doesn't burn DVDs of any kind. Without the actual id string - see the FREQUENT ANSWERS post referred to earlier for how to find it - it's impossible to do more than guess.

 

Also, check Digital Guru tbrewst's post earlier in the thread for unchaecking WinXP's Sessions-based recording (which is reliable) in favor of Drag2Disc (which, like all Packet-Writing programs, is best at permantly losing all data, and therefore unreliable).

 

Lynn

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I tried googling HP DVD/CD Writer 200j, and there isn't a "perfect match", which means you have not given us the actual id string. A quick glance at the results offer the possibilites it uses plus media but not dash media; or that it might be a "combo" drive - that is, CD-RW/DVD-ROM - and doesn't burn DVDs of any kind. Without the actual id string - see the FREQUENT ANSWERS post referred to earlier for how to find it - it's impossible to do more than guess.

 

Lynn

 

It's a "HP DVD Writer 200j". It writes DVD+RW and DVD+R, according to

http://www.cwol.com/dvd-burners/hp-dvd200i.htm

 

The HP DVD Writer 200 series were sold as 200e (external) or 200i (internal) but the actual drive carried the 200j identity string.

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  • 3 weeks later...
I wouldn't recommand ANY form of Packet-Writing. What it does best is permantly lose all data.

 

If you want to KEEP the data, NEVER format the disc. It is NOT like a magneticly-set floppy disc; it is an optical disc, and it is read by differentiating the height of the pits and lands.

 

For using optical media (CDs, DVDs), you are far better off with a Sessions-based program, whether you use Classic Creator or the WinXP built-in Sessions-based method.

 

You might check if any of your older Drag2Disc discs are still readable.

 

Using RW media is also asking for trouble - true, you can erase the entire disc and start over (making it good for testing purposes) but it will fade to blank on its own sooner or later - if formatted for Packet-Writing, usually sooner.

 

Lynn

What do you mean the RW media will " fade to blank" ? I've been using DVD +RW's for burning home movies. Are you saying these will fade away?

Jim

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What do you mean the RW media will " fade to blank" ? I've been using DVD +RW's for burning home movies. Are you saying these will fade away?

Jim

 

Yes, they will fade away, if they haven't already.

 

Commercial media is made by physically pressing the pits and lands into the aluminum (pits and lands, or depressions and flat spaces, are the optical equivilent of magnetic 0's and 1's).

 

R media is "burned" by having a laser "cook" a layer of dye to create the pits and lands.

 

RW media is "burned" by the laser melting and recrystalizing an aluminum alloy to create the pits and lands. The alloy promptly starts to de-crystalize, taking all the data with it. RW media is useful for testing purposes because it is possible to "erase" it (de-crystalize all of it at the same time) and re-use it.

 

When you create a disc on R or RW media, it has the same characteristics - you cannot erase individual items, you can only delete an item from the TOC (Table of Contents). You do not regain the space. The difference is with RW media you can erase the ENTIRE disc.

 

Meanwhile, the data on an RW fades out as the alloy decrystallizes - or, to put it another way, I lost the 80% of the data on the Packet-Written CD-RW that wasn't also on the Hard Drive. My software guru was right after all.

 

Even R media isn't "forever". You might find this page intersting -

http://club.cdfreaks.com/showthread.php?t=61943

 

You might also find the Byers Guide interesting - the way I find it when I want it is to go to google and enter "Byers Guide CD" (without the quotes) in the search field.

 

Meanwhile, I'd suggest you see if there is anything left on your older DVD/RWs. I'm not sure if the CD recovery programs will work on DVDs, but the odds are always poorer with RW than R because of the greater liklihood of the data having faded out.

 

Lynn

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Yes, they will fade away, if they haven't already.

 

Commercial media is made by physically pressing the pits and lands into the aluminum (pits and lands, or depressions and flat spaces, are the optical equivilent of magnetic 0's and 1's).

 

R media is "burned" by having a laser "cook" a layer of dye to create the pits and lands.

 

RW media is "burned" by the laser melting and recrystalizing an aluminum alloy to create the pits and lands. The alloy promptly starts to de-crystalize, taking all the data with it. RW media is useful for testing purposes because it is possible to "erase" it (de-crystalize all of it at the same time) and re-use it.

 

When you create a disc on R or RW media, it has the same characteristics - you cannot erase individual items, you can only delete an item from the TOC (Table of Contents). You do not regain the space. The difference is with RW media you can erase the ENTIRE disc.

 

Meanwhile, the data on an RW fades out as the alloy decrystallizes - or, to put it another way, I lost the 80% of the data on the Packet-Written CD-RW that wasn't also on the Hard Drive. My software guru was right after all.

 

Even R media isn't "forever". You might find this page intersting -

http://club.cdfreaks.com/showthread.php?t=61943

 

You might also find the Byers Guide interesting - the way I find it when I want it is to go to google and enter "Byers Guide CD" (without the quotes) in the search field.

 

Meanwhile, I'd suggest you see if there is anything left on your older DVD/RWs. I'm not sure if the CD recovery programs will work on DVDs, but the odds are always poorer with RW than R because of the greater liklihood of the data having faded out.

 

Lynn

Wow!! We might as well go back to VHS! This is a bummer !!

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Wow!! We might as well go back to VHS! This is a bummer !!

 

R media is almost as stable as commercially pressed discs.

 

RW media is highly unstable.

 

If you feel you must use RW media, yes, you would be better off not to even get into Digital recording.

 

Lynn

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