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making a movie - how much time should it take?


Rachelle

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I am still in the process of trying to make my 1st DVD. I am just putting a family clip together. In a previous post, I asked about stamping the date and time. So far I am figuring out that it takes about 3 hours to make a movie file without even editing it!?!? Is this right? Are there any short cuts as this is ridiculous.

 

It takes an hour to create my AVI file. (capture video)

About another hour to date/time stamp it with vDTS.

Then I have to wait another hour to "detect scenes".

I am still waiting to edit my 1st movie.....

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I am still in the process of trying to make my 1st DVD. I am just putting a family clip together. In a previous post, I asked about stamping the date and time. So far I am figuring out that it takes about 3 hours to make a movie file without even editing it!?!? Is this right? Are there any short cuts as this is ridiculous.

 

It takes an hour to create my AVI file. (capture video)

About another hour to date/time stamp it with vDTS.

Then I have to wait another hour to "detect scenes".

I am still waiting to edit my 1st movie.....

I don't know if this is any help to you or not. I have not actually made a DVD using AVI but I have tried to convert mpeg-1 to mpeg-2 and depending on the computer that can take from 13 minutes, down to three minutes When I was running. When I tried this on a Pentium III 800 MHz. It took 13 minutes to do a short clip to do the same thing on a Pentium 43.2 GHz machine. It took four minutes. What I am guessing is taking time to convert. If you could convert the file in to the format that DVDs are made up of beef for pulling it into DVD maker. It may help Michelle

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I don't know if this is any help to you or not. I have not actually made a DVD using AVI but I have tried to convert mpeg-1 to mpeg-2 and depending on the computer that can take from 13 minutes, down to three minutes When I was running. When I tried this on a Pentium III 800 MHz. It took 13 minutes to do a short clip to do the same thing on a Pentium 43.2 GHz machine. It took four minutes. What I am guessing is taking time to convert. If you could convert the file in to the format that DVDs are made up of beef for pulling it into DVD maker. It may help Michelle

 

I need to convert my 1 hour video tape to AVI othewise I can't use the vDTS.

My file is also about 12 GB!!! Is there a smaller version of AVI?

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Yes, there are many types of AVI files, but then vDTS may not accept them. The times you posted seem average for the average computer. Video stuff is VERY CPU intensive. The only way to speed things up is a faster CPU. When I first started video editing many year ago, 10-12 hours was common just to render ONE HOUR. Computers are much faster now and the software much better, too.

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I need to convert my 1 hour video tape to AVI othewise I can't use the vDTS.

My file is also about 12 GB!!! Is there a smaller version of AVI?

 

Where does the original file you are converting to avi come from? Was it captured initially froma DV camcorder? What format is it?

As far as I know, vDTS will put the date/time stamp only on the original captured avi file. If you capture to mpeg2, vDTS cannot add the date/time.

 

If you are capturing from a DV camcorder, you might consider using a small, free utility call WinDV. It captures the scenes to individual files in avi format which you can easily load into vDTS to have the date/time added. This also also makes editing a lot simpler since you are not working with one huge file. I generally use vDTS to fade in the date/time, show it for a few seconds and then have it fade out. There is really no need to show the date/time during the complete video.

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In addition to what has already been said, capture will always be real time. If you have 1 hour of video, it will take 1 hour to capture that video.

 

Also, if you are serious about making good videos, you will capture as an .avi file, and they will be large. Get the largest hard drive that you can afford.

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I save my tape directly from my DV camcorder to my computer as AVI (using firewire).

I'll look into the WinDV this week.

I have about a 110GB hard drive (C & D) now but it's so full of pictures and only VERY minimal space left over. But if capturing is real time, then I don't think it matters much? I just have to remember to delete the original file after I stamp it so I don't have 2 12GB files laying around.

I just wish there was one software which could do everything I need. I didn't think I was asking so much. Quite frustrating.

I will stick to this though as I am making home videos for our baby boy to watch when he gets older.

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I will stick to this though as I am making home videos for our baby boy to watch when he gets older.

It's worth it! Let me tell you how my teeners love watching their early years' videos. And I've been taking their videos (birthdays, graduation, 8th grade dance, Halloween, Christmas, summer vacation, dance recitals, school plays, sweet 16, etc) since I the day I bought my first and current Sony Hi8 camcorder. :)

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I save my tape directly from my DV camcorder to my computer as AVI (using firewire).

I'll look into the WinDV this week.

I have about a 110GB hard drive (C & D) now but it's so full of pictures and only VERY minimal space left over. But if capturing is real time, then I don't think it matters much? I just have to remember to delete the original file after I stamp it so I don't have 2 12GB files laying around.

I just wish there was one software which could do everything I need. I didn't think I was asking so much. Quite frustrating.

I will stick to this though as I am making home videos for our baby boy to watch when he gets older.

 

A few of recommendations:

-unless you use WinDV, try to capture in smaller 10-15 segments, you can combine them in Videowave or myDVD seamlessly if you need to. Editing small files is a lot easier and faster then trying to work with GBs sized files. If, while editing a huge file, some problem occured you could lose all or a lot of work while a small project could be quickly recreated

-archive your photos you now have on your hard drives to DVDs or other device to free up space on your hard drive. Doing video work requires lots of hard drive space. Roxio recommends about 1GB for every 5 minutes of capture and that is a conservative estimate.

-EMC 9 is a piece of software that will do everything you need. It just might not do it exactly the way you would like it to work

-learn to be patient while doing video work, it takes lots of times, there is no quick way. If you think 1 hour is too long to capture 1 hour of video, then wait until you get to the rendering stage: it takes about 3 hours to render 1 hour of source video into DVD compliant video.

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