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Crossfades


pmonaghan

Question

Hi. Am having a devil of a time getting crossfades to work for me and feeling quite dumb. I assume for a 15 second crossfade at the end of a track, I just put it in as 00:00:15, choose a type, and hit OK. However, I don't get a crossfade on playback or when burned.

 

What's up?

 

Help please!

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4 answers to this question

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Hi. Am having a devil of a time getting crossfades to work for me and feeling quite dumb. I assume for a 15 second crossfade at the end of a track, I just put it in as 00:00:15, choose a type, and hit OK. However, I don't get a crossfade on playback or when burned.

 

What's up?

 

Help please!

If it's like Jam 6, 15 sec. cross fade would be:

00:15:00

 

Cheers,

Dorian

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Hi. Am having a devil of a time getting crossfades to work for me and feeling quite dumb. I assume for a 15 second crossfade at the end of a track, I just put it in as 00:00:15, choose a type, and hit OK. However, I don't get a crossfade on playback or when burned.

 

What's up?

 

Help please!

 

 

Yes, that's the answer. In television, time durations can be set in HH:MM:SS.FF where the last two digits are frames and there are 30 frames per second, so the argument is 00 through 29 frames. In broadcast equipment, duration can also be set in just frames. For instance, to specify a 15 second crossfade, the duration would be (15 sec x 30 frames/sec) 450 frames, though no one in television would specify such a long duration given the short attention span most viewers have (What was I talking about?).

 

Anyway, I hope this helps.

 

Gerry

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Hi guys.

 

All of these suggestions help TONS. Thanks! Why is none of this in the documentation, help section, or support area? I checked all of them before whining!!

 

Thanks everybody!

 

patrick

 

 

Yes, that's the answer. In television, time durations can be set in HH:MM:SS.FF where the last two digits are frames and there are 30 frames per second, so the argument is 00 through 29 frames. In broadcast equipment, duration can also be set in just frames. For instance, to specify a 15 second crossfade, the duration would be (15 sec x 30 frames/sec) 450 frames, though no one in television would specify such a long duration given the short attention span most viewers have (What was I talking about?).

 

Anyway, I hope this helps.

 

Gerry

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