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here is another annoying "feature"


MonsterFISH

Question

whenever i am in the timeline mode editing movies and splitting and cropping the videos, the hard drive could nopt catch up with the software. it's as if i had to click on the "next frame" whenever the hard drive is ready....just a reminder that the disk drive is 400gb SATA II. and believe me, it takes more than 10 seconds sometimes...it seems each time there is a change, the application does the change immediate, or "real time". anyway, i still think it is very user friendly, except for the annoying unknown errors. The error trapping is very generic, i.e., "you got an error". instead of identifying where the error came from.

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Personally, I haven't been convinced that SATA is faster than good ole PATA 133, but that's another discussion. Sounds like you are trying to edit a compressed file format. ANY compressed file format (MPEG2/4, DivX, etc) MUST BE uncompressed 'on-the-fly' for editing so there is a lot of proxy file creation. CPU speed and hard drive I/O will play a huge part in this operation. This is why I recommend editing DV AVI only. MUCH FASTER on any video editor.

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hmm, that could be what is causing videowave9 to cause the error "generated an error and will close, all data unsaved data will be lost". Only because while i am still learning Vegas 6.0a, i really notice the big difference in file handling. very interesting. would a dual core 3.2ghz 400gbSATA2, 2gb RAM corsairs DDR2 800 be sufficient, or do i need a scsi ii disk drive, or better yet firewire?

 

thanks for the quick response by the way :)

 

:thumbsup:

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Home doesn't even KNOW what 64 bit CPUs, never mind multi-core CPUs, actually are - you need XP Pro (or XP Pro 64 bit)

 

XP Home is perfectly capable of multicore-CPU support and it actually works, see:

http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/highlights/multicore.mspx

especially:

"Windows XP Professional can support up to two processors regardless of the number of cores on the processor. Microsoft Windows XP Home supports one processor."

 

Home supports one physiacal processor regardless of number of cores.

 

X.

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More or less that's what happens - it extracts the stuff to a temp file, reads that and then wipes the temp file when it's finished

 

" Oh drat these computers, they're so naughty and so complex." (Marvin the Martian)

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That article talks about licensing. Not multithreading, etc. Easy way to find out. Press Atl-Cntl-Delete. Click the Perfomance TAB. Do you see TWO CPUS? If you don't then, WinXP Home does not KNOW there are two. My Media Center is based on WinXP Pro and does show two processors.

post-49-1170073697.jpg

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would a dual core 3.2ghz 400gbSATA2, 2gb RAM corsairs DDR2 800 be sufficient, or do i need a scsi ii disk drive, or better yet firewire?
Your computer should be more than sufficient. Very few apps are actually optimized for hyperthreading or mutli-core processors so mostly the CPU speed is what counts.
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Just to update- I removed Media Manager successfully as described above, but it really didn't make a noticable difference on the surface. My CPU still tops out at 100% as soon as I go into Videowave mode, and it takes a substantial amount of time to open up a folder dialog box when I need to add each song. Again- working in 20 minute chunks at a time and then adding them together in sequence definitely helps, as the final product I got last night proves. I just guess it's the nature of the beast when dealing with video editing.

 

Thanks for the help on this issue- maybe I'll discover something down the line the more I toy with the software.

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Your computer should be more than sufficient. Very few apps are actually optimized for hyperthreading or mutli-core processors so mostly the CPU speed is what counts.

 

This brings up a good point- glad I'm here.

 

I have some of my specs listed below, with all drivers updated. As you can see, my PC has a P4 2.8 Gigahertz speed, and 1.5g of RAM. That being said, as I discussed with ggrussell in a recent post, I learned quickly that when making a large (1 1/2 hour) mpeg-2 production, while getting rid of native audio, and adding about what will be a total of around 30 mp3s to a soundtrack- doing it in twenty miute chucks is almost necessary.

 

I've noticed by checking my task manager, that as soon as i enter videowave, my CPU maxes out at 100%, and things get REAL SLOW (main slowtime- waiting for a folder to choose an mp3).

 

I started pricing dual processor possibilities, but after reading this thread, I'm even more unsure of what may be causing the issue. Now, I also have a load of processes running, but don't know processes what I can end, or not without messing up the whole deal.

 

Any advice as always, would be greatly welcome. Thanks.

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Any chance you have Media Manager's 'watch folders' turned on? That thing is a resource hog and can bring any CPU to its knees. If you don't use any of the Media Manager features like watched folders, UPnP, and photo sharing across the net, you can uninstall Media Manager. That's what I have done. Those parts that are used by other apps will remain like the Media Selector in Videowave.

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It's more than just the app that needs to be capable of utilising SMPs (Symmetrical Multi Processors aka dual core, etc)

 

You also need an OS that can recognise that's what it is

 

To date, I've seen loads of dual core machines, even 64 bit single core, for sale - every single one of them with Windows XP Home edition

 

Home doesn't even KNOW what 64 bit CPUs, never mind multi-core CPUs, actually are - you need XP Pro (or XP Pro 64 bit)

 

And that looks to be what is coming with Vista - multi-core 64 bit CPUs with the basic version which won't be able to USE the two cores

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Any chance you have Media Manager's 'watch folders' turned on? That thing is a resource hog and can bring any CPU to its knees. If you don't use any of the Media Manager features like watched folders, UPnP, and photo sharing across the net, you can uninstall Media Manager. That's what I have done. Those parts that are used by other apps will remain like the Media Selector in Videowave.

 

 

I don't think I use any of those features- what's the benefit of watched folders? Does UPnP mean 'Universal Plug and Play'? I know for a fact I don't need the photo sharing thing. Sorry to sound so novice, but I still am. :)

 

Also, if i choose to uninstall Media manager, is that (1) Done the typical way, through Add/Remove Programs, and (2) Is it reinstallable?

 

Thanks

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UPnP in this context can be used with devices like DVD players with wireless ethernet or wireless speakers. Most of these devices are universal plug n play.

 

Yes, Control Panel - Add/Remove. Select EMC 9 and then MODIFY.

 

I'll try it when I get home. By what you describe, it sounds like i can get away with not using those features currently. Am I safe in assuming if I can uninstall that feature, that I can in turn reinstall it at a later time with no issues?

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I was really hoping that you would have success in an attempt to speed up the process. Unfortunately, I had the same result. i think the process is multiplied by 10 while uncompressing non-AVI files. This could explain the use of CPU and memory resources. To maybe speed up the work, find a utility to convert compressed files to AVI. Not sure if I want to go this route. :)

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