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malatekid

Seagate to sell laptop PCs w/ built-in encryption

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"Seagate Technology LLC, the world's largest hard drive maker, announced Monday the first manufacturer to sell laptop PCs with its new built-in encryption technology."

 

Read it here.

Edited by malatekid

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I think I'll wait and see just how long my new "Seagate-Baracuda" 320GB SATA drive lasts before I think about one of their laptops <_<

 

Frank...

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How's the new Barracuda hard drive? Mine is expected to be delivered this Friday (March 16). I already received the Coolmax enclosure to house that HD.

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How's the new Barracuda hard drive? Mine is expected to be delivered this Friday (March 16). I already received the Coolmax enclosure to house that HD.

Mine is also due Friday and my enclosure is due today. It will be used immediately.

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Guest ml
"Seagate Technology LLC, the world's largest hard drive maker, announced Monday the first manufacturer to sell laptop PCs with its new built-in encryption technology."

 

They're obviously marketing to businesses. With the explosion of laptops being used in business and the possibility of those laptops being lost or stolen, this sound like a long overdue idea.

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They're obviously marketing to businesses. With the explosion of laptops being used in business and the possibility of those laptops being lost or stolen, this sound like a long overdue idea.

We already have cases of stolen laptops here in our office. :(

Edited by malatekid

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We already have cases of stolen laptops here in our office. :(

Since my son really benefits from using a laptop in school and me knowing how hormonal changes effect common sense and add in a very high ratio of 'lard -&amp;%&#036;', I tried a 1 year subscription with Lojak for laptops which was $40 (just increased this recently to $50). 2 laptops in his school have been stolen so far and not returned. My son has mentioned to any one will listen that his dad has tracking software on his laptop and he still has it.

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Since my son really benefits from using a laptop in school and me knowing how hormonal changes effect common sense and add in a very high ratio of 'lard -&amp;%&#036;', I tried a 1 year subscription with Lojak for laptops which was $40 (just increased this recently to $50). 2 laptops in his school have been stolen so far and not returned. My son has mentioned to any one will listen that his dad has tracking software on his laptop and he still has it.

Sounds like an excellent software and not a bad price for a one year service.

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Guest ml
Sounds like an excellent software and not a bad price for a one year service.

I agree and will probably look into that for the laptop that we'll get for the senior in our house who's going off to college next term.

 

Companies aren't as worried about losing the computer as they are the information on the hard drive. It's pretty tough to explain to your customers how their private information has been stolen.

 

An encrypted hard drive with password protection would hopefully solve that problem.

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I wonder what kind of encryption they'll be using. I am generally suspicious of proprietary encryption. I use PGP whole disk encryption on my system. PGP has yet to be cracked by anyone, and the best estimate for a brute-force crack, using a top of the line system running 24/7 is around a thousand years.

 

I don't trust the lojack software. First of all, despite what they claim, it is not "format proof". It has been removed in many, many demonstrations. Which means that if you're using encryption on your system, it's practically worthless, since the thieves will undoubtably wipe the drive first thing, anyway; since they won't be able to get in to it.

 

Secondly, I'm not too big on the idea of software that that is specifically designed to let people know where I am whenever I am using my laptop.

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"How's the new Barracuda hard drive?"

 

The day I got it it was installed (Mine is interior) but I did have a bit of a problem getting all the BIOS setup set right. But now everything is working great and the drive is huge !! 320GB is the biggest drive I have now. It's also very quiet. So far I have trabsferred all of my personal files including all of the EMC programs and associated productions, ISO and DVD's to the new drive. Now I have the slave drive that had all of that on it pretty much empty now. I also have everything backed up on CD's, so I should be pretty safe.

 

BTW, that encryption you have Paul for the notebook must be doing a good job. I don't take my notebook that many places, so I don't feel like I need that kind of protection. But for school, business etc. I still think is is a good idea to have some type of protection from theft.

 

Frank...

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I wonder what kind of encryption they'll be using. I am generally suspicious of proprietary encryption. I use PGP whole disk encryption on my system. PGP has yet to be cracked by anyone, and the best estimate for a brute-force crack, using a top of the line system running 24/7 is around a thousand years.

 

I don't trust the lojack software. First of all, despite what they claim, it is not "format proof". It has been removed in many, many demonstrations. Which means that if you're using encryption on your system, it's practically worthless, since the thieves will undoubtably wipe the drive first thing, anyway; since they won't be able to get in to it.

 

Secondly, I'm not too big on the idea of software that that is specifically designed to let people know where I am whenever I am using my laptop.

Since the primary idea is to prevent the theft of information, that sounds like a recommendation for lojack.

 

And if memory of reviews I've read serves me right, the often get the computer back as well.

 

Lynn

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