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Directcd Vs Mac


lihp33

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Are there any known problems with reading a CD-R on a MAC, that was created with DirectCD on a PC?

[basic stuff = DirectCD 5.1, under Windows 98, drive=HL-DT-ST CD-RW GCE-8240B]

I dumped files to a CD-R, closed to be readable on any computer, but when tried on two different Mac's the disk was unreadable. The documentation suggests the ISO format used should be acceptable to Mac's.

 

I noticed in the common answers section of the forum that a CD formatted by DirectCD requires DirectCD for reading. Does that apply even if "closed to be readable on any computer"? Does that mean the Mac would require a version of DirectCD on order to read it.

It seems I cannot move files to a blank CD without first formatting the CD. Catch 22, or am I missing something somewheres?

 

Thanks for any help anyone might provide

Phil

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Are there any known problems with reading a CD-R on a MAC, that was created with DirectCD on a PC?

[basic stuff = DirectCD 5.1, under Windows 98, drive=HL-DT-ST CD-RW GCE-8240B]

I dumped files to a CD-R, closed to be readable on any computer, but when tried on two different Mac's the disk was unreadable. The documentation suggests the ISO format used should be acceptable to Mac's.

 

I noticed in the common answers section of the forum that a CD formatted by DirectCD requires DirectCD for reading. Does that apply even if "closed to be readable on any computer"? Does that mean the Mac would require a version of DirectCD on order to read it.

It seems I cannot move files to a blank CD without first formatting the CD. Catch 22, or am I missing something somewheres?

 

Thanks for any help anyone might provide

Phil

A PC uses .udf files, while a Mac does Packet-Writing with HFS files. To make it mutually compatible, use ISO 9660 (as opposed to ISO 9600 or Joliet). (Note to fellow Digital Gurus: this is saved from a post by Alexatrox from the old boards.)

 

If, on the other hand, you had used a Sessions-based program like DataProject, and closed the disc, it should be readable just about anywhere a commercially pressed CD is.

 

Lynn

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If, on the other hand, you had used a Sessions-based program like DataProject, and closed the disc, it should be readable just about anywhere a commercially pressed CD is.

Lynn

Just to clarify what Lynn is saying, using a Data CD project in ECDC 5, you start with a blank, unformatted disc, and write a "session". This uses the ISO9660 format, which should be readable on your Mac. So indeed, you can write to CD without formatting first. In fact, I almost never write using Direct CD since there are so many opportunities for it to fail and lose data.

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A PC uses .udf files, while a Mac does Packet-Writing with HFS files. To make it mutually compatible, use ISO 9660 (as opposed to ISO 9600 or Joliet). (Note to fellow Digital Gurus: this is saved from a post by Alexatrox from the old boards.)

 

If, on the other hand, you had used a Sessions-based program like DataProject, and closed the disc, it should be readable just about anywhere a commercially pressed CD is.

 

Lynn

 

Thanks for the replies. I'll try the route suggested. It is curious that the DirectCD documentation states it uses ISO9660 when "Closing to read on all computers".

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Thanks for the replies. I'll try the route suggested. It is curious that the DirectCD documentation states it uses ISO9660 when "Closing to read on all computers".

 

It's also possible the Packet-Writing has failed, which Packet-Writing is so very good at.

 

Or, if you used CD-RW, the re-crystalized aluminum alloy is de-crystalizing and taking the data with it, which is why RW media is only good for short-term things like testing.

 

If you want to KEEP the data, NEVER format the disc. There are other options, including Sessions-based CD writing, Flash drives (aka Jump, Thumb, Keychain, Pen drives), and Zip drives. All will work for transferring data between computers, but if transferred to a WinXP computer, be sure you EJECT Zip and Flash media or it will eat it.

 

Lynn

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Thanks for the replies. I'll try the route suggested. It is curious that the DirectCD documentation states it uses ISO9660 when "Closing to read on all computers".

That's true... but I believe in ECDC/DCD 5, there are two options for closing the disc, one is to UDF 1.5, and the other is ISO9660 level 3. ISO9660 level 3, is slightly different than ISO9660 level 1, which is what is used to write sessions. Level 3 is not readable on a DOS system, and I don't know about Mac, but that may be the difference and why it's not readable on your system.

 

Stick with writing sessions.

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That's true... but I believe in ECDC/DCD 5, there are two options for closing the disc, one is to UDF 1.5, and the other is ISO9660 level 3. ISO9660 level 3, is slightly different than ISO9660 level 1, which is what is used to write sessions. Level 3 is not readable on a DOS system, and I don't know about Mac, but that may be the difference and why it's not readable on your system.

 

Stick with writing sessions.

I went that route and it worked. Thanks for all the help.

Phil

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