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How Does Roxio Diable Windows Xp Cd Copy Program?


lrcite

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Greetings,

 

I am using EMC 7 with all current updates on Windows XP with SP2 and all current updates.

 

Is seems like Roxio has taken over the Copy to CD function of Windows XP Operating System. When I want to copy files from My Document to a Recordable CD through the Windows XP function Roxio wants to do this service instead of Windows.

 

How does Roxio disable this function in Windows? Or does it?

 

I would like to use both programs side by side. I like the Creator Classic portion of EMC 7. I also like Windows XP ablity to copy files to a CD.

 

When I want to give a set of documents or files to a co-worker I want to be able to use Windows XP Copy to CD function to put the files on a Recordable CD. Not everyone I know uses Roxio.

 

Thanks in advance for your help and comments,

 

Leigh

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I wasnt implying anything of the sort. I was talking CD-RW not CD-R's .I suggest you re-read my last post again James.

At no point did i say a CD-R was reusable. In fact i said "when its full its full" Meaning, thats it for that one.

Only point i was making and will again is......... there is no need whatsoever to packet write with a CD-RW Disk. :)

 

Actually, I think he read your last post. I believe you said that there is absolutely no reason to write to a CD-RW, when Lynn was basically saying that there is, if you want to re-use the disk. I believe that James was reinforcing that statement.

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Actually, I think he read your last post. I believe you said that there is absolutely no reason to write to a CD-RW, when Lynn was basically saying that there is, if you want to re-use the disk. I believe that James was reinforcing that statement.

 

I think colbaby has decided what he thinks RW media is. That doesn't mean what he has decided is what it acually is, but the information is available for those with an open mind.

 

Lynn

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I think colbaby has decided what he thinks RW media is. That doesn't mean what he has decided is what it acually is, but the information is available for those with an open mind.

 

Lynn

 

 

LOL Myself and all my staff know all about media types, thank you very much.

But Lyne did state back a few posts this: "I lost the 80% of what was on the Packet-Written CD-RW" What i was questioning was why would anyone want to packet write to CD-RW ???

Thats all. :)

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LOL Myself amd all my staff know all about all sorts of media types. thank you very much.

But Lyne did state back a few posts this: "I lost the 80% of what was on the Packet-Written CD-RW" What i was questioning was why would anyone want to packet write to CD-RW ???

 

I can't understand why any intelligent person would ever use packet writing software for anything other than immediate transfer of data from one computer to another.

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I can't understand why any intelligent person would ever use packet writing software for anything other than immediate transfer of data from one computer to another.

 

I agree Grandpa. But that intelligent person would surely use a plain CD-R for packet writing.

A CD-RW disk used for that purpose defeats the whole object of it.

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I can't understand why any intelligent person would ever use packet writing software for anything other than immediate transfer of data from one computer to another.

 

Because of Basic False Analogy.

 

However, despite his apparent knowledge, colbaby has a closed mind, assuming a "RW" disc is rewritable at will like a floppy, which it most certainly is NOT. He, too, has subscribed to Basic False Anology. But then, what do I expect of someone who can't even read my name?

 

Lynn

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Because of Basic False Analogy.

 

However, despite his apparent knowledge, colbaby has a closed mind, assuming a "RW" disc is rewritable at will like a floppy, which it most certainly is NOT. He, too, has subscribed to Basic False Anology. But then, what do I expect of someone who can't even read my name?

 

Lynn

 

We write files one or two or thirty at a time to CD-RW disks all day long not quite like a floppy though granted, the disks do eject, but then you just pop them back in and carry on .Have done for well over 5 years in our studios. Nothing magical about that. :)

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We write files one or two or thirty at a time to CD-RW disks all day long not quite like a floppy though granted, the disks do eject, but then you just pop them back in and carry on .Have done for well over 5 years in our studios. Nothing magical about that. :)

 

If you came to me, looking for a job, and you said that you used packet writing software for backing up business files, I would show you the door, in a heartbeat.

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If you came to me, looking for a job, and you said that you used packet writing software for backing up business files, I would show you the door, in a heartbeat.

 

 

1) I have a very very good job :)

 

2)I wouldnt use CD-RWs for packet writing.Why would i ? I thought i explained it all in my previous posts.

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We write files one or two or thirty at a time to CD-RW disks all day long not quite like a floppy though granted, the disks do eject, but then you just pop them back in and carry on .Have done for well over 5 years in our studios. Nothing magical about that. :)

You coud do exactly the same thing with CD-Rs.

 

try it.

 

Lynn

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Greetings,

 

I am using EMC 7 with all current updates on Windows XP with SP2 and all current updates.

 

Is seems like Roxio has taken over the Copy to CD function of Windows XP Operating System. When I want to copy files from My Document to a Recordable CD through the Windows XP function Roxio wants to do this service instead of Windows.

 

How does Roxio disable this function in Windows? Or does it?

 

I would like to use both programs side by side. I like the Creator Classic portion of EMC 7. I also like Windows XP ablity to copy files to a CD.

 

When I want to give a set of documents or files to a co-worker I want to be able to use Windows XP Copy to CD function to put the files on a Recordable CD. Not everyone I know uses Roxio.

 

Thanks in advance for your help and comments,

 

Leigh

 

 

"imapi.exe is a part of the Microsoft Windows operating system, more specifically the Image Mastering Applications Programming Interface, which is used for CD recording. This program is important for the stable and secure running of your computer and should not be terminated"

 

On my systems with any burning software installed I set IMAPI to manual. Against all the advice I read! My systems run better in xpsp2 in manual and have no burning problems in any software I use. But don't use IMAPI buggy. You can find it here, right click my computer, manage, expand services and look for IMAPI.

 

 

cdanteek

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That's swell.

I don't see how No. 1 above can be true. Both oars don't seem to be in the water. You are a damned good troll, though.

 

I can only assume that you havent actually used Xp's built in Disk Copying tools and Use EMC for everything. Well hidden away in the right -click menu, is a shortcut called Send to disk. NOW... if you put a CD-RW in the drive. You can do the following. Multi select items in a folder and right-click /Send to disk. (You can do this time and time again)

You dont even have to have EMC installed to do this :) Amazing isnt it.

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Greetings,

 

I am using EMC 7 with all current updates on Windows XP with SP2 and all current updates.

 

Is seems like Roxio has taken over the Copy to CD function of Windows XP Operating System. When I want to copy files from My Document to a Recordable CD through the Windows XP function Roxio wants to do this service instead of Windows.

 

How does Roxio disable this function in Windows? Or does it?

 

I would like to use both programs side by side. I like the Creator Classic portion of EMC 7. I also like Windows XP ablity to copy files to a CD.

 

When I want to give a set of documents or files to a co-worker I want to be able to use Windows XP Copy to CD function to put the files on a Recordable CD. Not everyone I know uses Roxio.

 

Thanks in advance for your help and comments,

 

Leigh

 

If you use Creator Classic to burn the documents to a CD, others do not need to have Roxio installed to retrieve them. They simply put the CD in their drive, and copy the documents to their hard drive.

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I can only assume that you havent actually used Xp's built in Disk Copying tools and Use EMC for everything. Well hidden away in the right -click menu, is a shortcut called Send to disk. NOW... if you put a CD-RW in the drive. You can do the following. Multi select items in a folder and right-click /Send to disk. (You can do this time and time again)

You dont even have to have EMC installed to do this :) Amazing isnt it.

 

You can do EXACTLY the same thing with a CD-R.

 

The fact is, aside from using different laser modes, there is no difference in burning CD-R and CD-RW.

 

The difference is that CD-RW:

 

(1) can be erased completely and reused - as with a CD-R, selective "deletes" simply remove something from the TOC (Table of Contents) but don't recover the space

 

(2) will fade out as the recrystalized alloy de-crystalilzes, thereby losing everything on it. It happens sooner or later, but if formatted for Packet-Writing, usually sooner.

 

So if your company "saves" everything to CD-RW, they don't actually save anything.

 

Lynn

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You can do EXACTLY the same thing with a CD-R.

 

The fact is, aside from using different laser modes, there is no difference in burning CD-R and CD-RW.

 

The difference is that CD-RW:

 

(1) can be erased completely and reused - as with a CD-R, selective "deletes" simply remove something from the TOC (Table of Contents) but don't recover the space

 

(2) will fade out as the recrystalized alloy de-crystalilzes, thereby losing everything on it. It happens sooner or later, but if formatted for Packet-Writing, usually sooner.

 

So if your company "saves" everything to CD-RW, they don't actually save anything.

 

Lynn

 

OK Lynn, so whats your preferred method for storage? Thanks.

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Greetings,

 

I am using EMC 7 with all current updates on Windows XP with SP2 and all current updates.

 

Is seems like Roxio has taken over the Copy to CD function of Windows XP Operating System. When I want to copy files from My Document to a Recordable CD through the Windows XP function Roxio wants to do this service instead of Windows.

 

How does Roxio disable this function in Windows? Or does it?

 

I would like to use both programs side by side. I like the Creator Classic portion of EMC 7. I also like Windows XP ablity to copy files to a CD.

 

When I want to give a set of documents or files to a co-worker I want to be able to use Windows XP Copy to CD function to put the files on a Recordable CD. Not everyone I know uses Roxio.

 

Thanks in advance for your help and comments,

 

Leigh

 

 

Coincidentally the Built in Disk Copier in XP is actually supplied by Roxio , guess everyone knew that though eh :)

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Perhaps you have drag to disc enabled I would unistall this feature as

it causes more problems than it is worth or while in widows explorer

right click on your burner and see if cd recording is enabled

 

Agreed.

 

If the OP wants to KEEP the data, NEVER format the disc.

 

Once the disc is formatted for Packet-Writing, it will call up the Packet-Writing program that created it any time it is inserted in the computer. A formatted disc can ONLY be read by the program that created it - Packet-Writing programs are proprietary, so cannot read each other's Packet-Writing.

 

Further, Packet-Written discs have a tendancy to fail (usually at the worst possible time).

 

If RW media is used for Packet-Writing, the fading to blank (which happens with RW media, as the re-crystalized alloy de-crystalizes) is usually speeded up.

 

If the formatted disc is RW media, it can be erased, and reused for testing purposes. If it is R media, the best thing to do is to save any data you want to keep back to the Hard Drive, and carefully put the disc itself somewhere else, such as the trash can.

 

To KEEP the data, use a Sessions-based program, such as Classic Creator, or the built-in WinXP burning program. To LOSE the data permantly - ah, that is what Packet-Writing does so well!!

 

Lynn

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Greetings,

 

I am using EMC 7 with all current updates on Windows XP with SP2 and all current updates.

 

Is seems like Roxio has taken over the Copy to CD function of Windows XP Operating System. When I want to copy files from My Document to a Recordable CD through the Windows XP function Roxio wants to do this service instead of Windows.

 

How does Roxio disable this function in Windows? Or does it?

 

I would like to use both programs side by side. I like the Creator Classic portion of EMC 7. I also like Windows XP ablity to copy files to a CD.

 

When I want to give a set of documents or files to a co-worker I want to be able to use Windows XP Copy to CD function to put the files on a Recordable CD. Not everyone I know uses Roxio.

 

Thanks in advance for your help and comments,

 

Leigh

 

It is not uncommon for XP Burning to become disabled during the install or removal of burning software.

 

In spite of all the beating around the bush and trips off on unrelated tangents, the simple answer is, use Explorer to examine the drives Properties.

 

Select the Recording tab and put a checkmark by Enable CD recording on this drive[\b].

 

Now you can have Classic, D2D and XP Burning to choose from.

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LOL Myself and all my staff know all about media types, thank you very much.

But Lyne did state back a few posts this: "I lost the 80% of what was on the Packet-Written CD-RW" What i was questioning was why would anyone want to packet write to CD-RW ???

Thats all. :)

For convenience. When you use it as a multi-session CD, as you are (and as XP does with it's built-in burning), you can't re-use any part of the disc until you actually erase the entire thing. Yes, you can continue adding more sessions (files) until it is full, but then, to re-use the disc, you must erase it. With packet writing (which I don't advocate using), the system will actually re-use the space from files that have been deleted previously, without requiring you to erase the entire disc. That does not happen when you use it as a multi-session disc. And you can keep adding files exactly the same way to a CD-R disc. The only difference, as you acknowledged, is that it can't be erased afterwards. No need to packet write to the CD-R either, just keep adding using XP's built-in software until it's full.

 

The same question applies to CD-R, why use packet writing for it? Convenience.

 

Why use CD-RW for multi-session when erasable media can become unreadable all on its own? Because for short-term storage, for moving files, it's convenient.

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Perhaps you have drag to disc enabled I would unistall this feature as

it causes more problems than it is worth or while in widows explorer

right click on your burner and see if cd recording is enabled

 

 

Thank you.

 

Yes, Drag to Disk is enabled.

 

I will check to see if CD recording is enabled through Properties in my CD/DVD burner.

 

Leigh

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"imapi.exe is a part of the Microsoft Windows operating system, more specifically the Image Mastering Applications Programming Interface, which is used for CD recording. This program is important for the stable and secure running of your computer and should not be terminated"

 

On my systems with any burning software installed I set IMAPI to manual. Against all the advice I read! My systems run better in xpsp2 in manual and have no burning problems in any software I use. But don't use IMAPI buggy. You can find it here, right click my computer, manage, expand services and look for IMAPI.

cdanteek

 

cdanteek,

 

Thank you.

 

I am not sure what IMAPI is so will have to do some reading to become familiar with what you are telling me.

 

If you use Creator Classic to burn the documents to a CD, others do not need to have Roxio installed to retrieve them. They simply put the CD in their drive, and copy the documents to their hard drive.

 

Thanks.

 

I was not clear in my post. Now I understand the difference between using Creator Classic and Packet Writing.

 

Leigh

 

 

Agreed.

 

If the OP wants to KEEP the data, NEVER format the disc.

 

Once the disc is formatted for Packet-Writing, it will call up the Packet-Writing program that created it any time it is inserted in the computer. A formatted disc can ONLY be read by the program that created it - Packet-Writing programs are proprietary, so cannot read each other's Packet-Writing.

 

Further, Packet-Written discs have a tendancy to fail (usually at the worst possible time).

 

If RW media is used for Packet-Writing, the fading to blank (which happens with RW media, as the re-crystalized alloy de-crystalizes) is usually speeded up.

 

If the formatted disc is RW media, it can be erased, and reused for testing purposes. If it is R media, the best thing to do is to save any data you want to keep back to the Hard Drive, and carefully put the disc itself somewhere else, such as the trash can.

 

To KEEP the data, use a Sessions-based program, such as Classic Creator, or the built-in WinXP burning program. To LOSE the data permantly - ah, that is what Packet-Writing does so well!!

 

Lynn

 

Lynn,

 

Thanks so much.

 

This was what I was confused about and trying to explain. Now I understand the difference between using Classic Creator and the process of Packet-Writing. My co-workers who received my disks that were created when Packet-Writting was used and they did not have a program installed on their computer that could read Packet-Writen CDs could not utilize the CDs I gave them.

 

Also, I can now use Windows CD writer function and Roxio will not step in to do the task.

 

Leigh

 

 

 

 

It is not uncommon for XP Burning to become disabled during the install or removal of burning software.

 

In spite of all the beating around the bush and trips off on unrelated tangents, the simple answer is, use Explorer to examine the drives Properties.

 

Select the Recording tab and put a checkmark by Enable CD recording on this drive[\b].

 

Now you can have Classic, D2D and XP Burning to choose from.

 

Thanks, that is exactly what happened. Now I have made all the proper settings and I should be able to use Classic, D2D and XP Burning.

 

Thanks.

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