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Music CD-R versus Data CD-R


Rayi

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I have been told by my dealership that if I use a data CD-R in my car CD/mp3 player and it gets damaged, my warranty would be voided. It is recommended that I use a music CD-R instead. They claim that music CD-R are built more to specification; they said that there is a difference in thickness. This issue came up because CD's will not inject in my new 2007 Ford Focus. I have never heard this before. My daughter has a fairly inexpensive car cd player and she has been using data CDR's for years with no problem. Although, my manual does not specifically state that I use music CD-R's but it does state that certain CD-R's may cause problems. So I do not understand how I would now this. The whole issue is very annoying because it is also a MP3 player. I might expect something like this in a regular CD player but not a MP3 player. I did call some local car audio CD player installers and they said that they have never heard of this. I was wondering if anyone else has heard of this particular issue?

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I have been told by my dealership that if I use a data CD-R in my car CD/mp3 player and it gets damaged, my warranty would be voided. It is recommended that I use a music CD-R instead. They claim that music CD-R are built more to specification; they said that there is a difference in thickness. This issue came up because CD's will not inject in my new 2007 Ford Focus. I have never heard this before. My daughter has a fairly inexpensive car cd player and she has been using data CDR's for years with no problem. Although, my manual does not specifically state that I use music CD-R's but it does state that certain CD-R's may cause problems. So I do not understand how I would now this. The whole issue is very annoying because it is also a MP3 player. I might expect something like this in a regular CD player but not a MP3 player. I did call some local car audio CD player installers and they said that they have never heard of this. I was wondering if anyone else has heard of this particular issue?

I've got a few friends with cd/mp3 players and have never heard them mention any problem at all with their players. Seems like they're covering all their bases to me.

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I have been told by my dealership that if I use a data CD-R in my car CD/mp3 player and it gets damaged, my warranty would be voided. It is recommended that I use a music CD-R instead.

 

I haven't heard of it either.

 

But if it's going to void your warranty...... I'd go find some music CD-R's.

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Although, my manual does not specifically state that I use music CD-R's but it does state that certain CD-R's may cause problems. So I do not understand how I would now this. The whole issue is very annoying because it is also a MP3 player. I might expect something like this in a regular CD player but not a MP3 player.

 

You need to make mp3 disc's. I have never heard of a place to buy a mp3 disc, in the US. So of course it's a burned CD-R.

 

Are they CD-R or CD/RW's 650mb 74 minute or 700mb 80 minute?

Do you have a EMC product installed to check the MID Media ID or Manufacturer Name of the CD-R your using in DVDInfoPro or Roxio disc and device utility?

 

If not download the free CDDVDSpeed, Google download and post the MID Manufacturer Name of the CD-R's your using.

 

Example,

 

Roxio DVDInfoPro

Media Information

 

Format Capacity Blank Disc

Free Blocks 736964608

Free Capacity 702.82MB(736.96MB)

Media Type CD-R

ATIP Start Time of Lead In (Media Code) 97m34s23f

ATIP Last Possible Start Time of Lead Out 79m59s73f

Manufacturer Name Verbatim Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation

HD-BURN Certified YES

Available Write Descriptor CAV 48.0x 7200KBps

Available Write Descriptor CAV 32.0x 4800KBps

Available Write Descriptor CAV 16.0x 2400KBps

Available Write Descriptor CAV 8.0x 1200KBps

Available Write Descriptor CAV 4.0x 600KBps

 

Complete Media Code

 

cd

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Back around 2002, I read that the difference between a CD-R and a Music CD-R (and I'd just bought some of the latter) is that Music CD-Rs have one data bit of information to start with - which allow use on stand-alone music recorders. Other than that, they are the same - you can use Music CD-Rs for data, and I have one that someone gave me which was.

 

I would wonder if there is some difference between manufacturer, or between brands, or between batches, or even between the dyes used - any of which could be the problem. Some CD readers (both computer and non-computer) are pickier than others.

 

Certainly, an .mp3 CD is a data disc. And many car players are on the finnicky side for reading CD-Rs at all.

 

Here's some additional info (at the bottom of JDF's post) on music CD-Rs - and the original question is similar to yours so you might want to read it all:

http://www.cdrom-guide.com/forums/showthread.php?t=275768

 

Lynn

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I do know that over here 'music rated' CD-Rs are more expensive than generic.

 

Makes me wonder if this is the RIAA trying to claw back some cash from people making their own music CDS ;)

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Mmmm ... DVDs have a difference in thickness, versus CDs ... I find that a strange comment, tho.

 

Lynn

The specifications for Data and Audio CDs are the same... they're based on the same technology. Now, if the theory is that corners are being cut in the cheap "data" CD-R market, and the discs are being made thinner, I suppose that's a possibility, but any significant deviation will reduce readability as the focusing distance is supposed to be a fixed distance from the bottom of the disc.

 

Yes, DVDs are a different thickness from CDs, and the reflective read layer is sandwiched between two layers of plastic, where CDs have the read layer on the "top" of the disc, and the laser must read through the full thickness of the polycarbonate. That makes CDs much more vulnerable to scratches on the top surface.

 

The only thing I can think of in reference to the original posters query is that possibly putting a stick-on label on a disc may make it too thick to properly be handled by the player, and that wouldn't be a new issue.

 

Although, my manual does not specifically state that I use music CD-R's but it does state that certain CD-R's may cause problems.

I would trust that statement more than the dealer's statement about using Music CD-Rs vs. Data CD-R's. It's entirely possibly that some brands may "cause problem" and those problems would simply be that the player can't read them. Just like some folks have problems with certain brands of discs moving them from one machine to another, where other brands work just fine. Car CD players have been potentially "finicky" forever about what brands/type of media they'll like. Nothing new there.

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They did it years ago with a surcharge on audio cassettes anf it didn't matter if it was a C5 (five minute data tape) or a C90 (90 minute tape)

 

Probably they're pushing the 'music CDs' so they can collect your cash :P

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For my 2 cents worth...

 

I don't believe there is a difference in regards to "data" written to a disk designed for music or a disk designed for data.

 

I have noticed a difference in thickness of Cd's but have never payed too much attention to it.

 

I can say that the car the wife drives, has a 6 disk CD changer in it and it supports playing MP3 disks. One time a CD (CD-R) did indeed get stuck.

 

I had to take the whole dash apart to get to the changer as it is an OEM system. This project took a few hours as well as almost a 12 pack of beer :D

 

The disk moves around by a very complicated mechanism but when the disk spits out the front of the changer or you load a disk, it gets sandwiched between rubber rollers both top and bottom so I can see how a "thin" disk may not engage the rubber rollers correctly.

 

However.... What I found is that the disk in question was a generic, cheap, bulk purchase disk. Yes it was thinner than a quality disk but I believe the real problem is the fact that the disk was just a shiny, slippery, silver topped disk. You can't write on these or print in them. I hope I am explaining this so you guys can understand.

 

If I use a "matte" finished disk, there is absolutely no problem in regards to loading and ejecting the disks. The ruffer "matte" finish does not slip on the rubber rollers.

 

So when you combine the thickness and the shiny, slippery top surface of the disk, that I believe is what caused the "hang up".

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I have been reading the manual regarding this matter various times but the exact quote from the manual is "CD units are designed to play commercially pressed 4.75 in (12cm) audio compact discs only. Due to technical incompatibility certain recordable and re-recordable compact discs may not function correctly when used in Ford CD players....." at the end it says "It is recommended that homemade CDs be identified with permanent felt tip marker rather than adhesive lables." Someone could easily overlook this because it doesn't specifically say to use Audio or music CDR but to use "audio compact discs". I cannot really find where it says it will void the warranty if you use data CD-R's. But I guess it must be some RIAA thing to scare you. Of course, if it is true, it would be safer to use the music CDRs just in case something happens. But it may be true that the more expensive Music CD-Rs would be better and more consistently made than some cheaper brands of CD-Rs. Apple computer started using these types of CD players in their computers but I heard they had some problems. I don't know if they still use them. I Often think that I would prefer having a tray in my Car CD player. Right now I don't want to ask too many questions at the dealship till they install a new CD player in my car.

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Due to technical incompatibility certain recordable and re-recordable compact discs may not function correctly when used in Ford CD players.

 

My Chevy truck has no problems playing data CD's burned as Audio CD's. Maybe you should consider a brand change?

 

I cannot really find where it says it will void the warranty if you use data CD-R's.

 

Of couse it won't it's a MP3 player. I thought we covered this.

 

But I guess it must be some RIAA thing to scare you.

 

Are you serious?

 

But it may be true that the more expensive Music CD-Rs would be better and more consistently made than some cheaper brands of CD-Rs.

 

"Ve haff vays of making you pay"

 

That's how they sell music CD's.

 

cd

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Speaking from experience. I do know that the thickness of the cd does matter. A lot of car reciever manufactures stipulate no cd's with stick on lables. I personally will soon have to replace my head unit for ignoring that warning. As far as music to data goes, I know they use different dyes when making the blanks. And I have had real time cd recorders that explicitly and repetedly tell you to use the music cd's for recording. But I dont think it matters when it comes to play back. I think it is a thickness issue. So if it were me I would check the actual thickness of the two types and if there is a difference then use the ones they recomend.

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Speaking from experience. I do know that the thickness of the cd does matter. A lot of car reciever manufactures stipulate no cd's with stick on lables. I personally will soon have to replace my head unit for ignoring that warning. As far as music to data goes, I know they use different dyes when making the blanks. And I have had real time cd recorders that explicitly and repetedly tell you to use the music cd's for recording. But I dont think it matters when it comes to play back. I think it is a thickness issue. So if it were me I would check the actual thickness of the two types and if there is a difference then use the ones they recomend.

Okay... this discussion is getting a bit silly.

 

Yes, the added thickness of a stick-on label can cause problems with getting jammed in the drive... obviously, don't use them. The nominal thickness of a "Music CD-R" and a "Data CD-R" are the same, the dyes used on the two are compatible (there are different types of dye in use between various brands of Data CD-Rs too) it's not a "specific dye" used for Music CD-Rs. The difference is in the master used to press the blanks. As was said very early on in this discussion, in the center area of the disc, there's a bit pressed to indicate if a disc is a "Music CD-R" and thus can be used in one of the dedicated Music CD-R recorders. That's the difference.

 

Now I'll indulge in some opinion: I doubt that even if your warranty said that using CD-R discs will void the warranty that it could be enforced. The printer companies tried that with off-brand inks and lost. (You can NOT void the warranty of your printer by using non-OEM ink.) And nothing that has been quoted here indicates that their saying that anyway. They talk about the use of homemade discs in the player, and how there may be problems reading them. Yep. It's been that way with car stereos forever. Get a good brand or two of discs, write a few, try them. If they work, great, if not, you're NOT going to ruin the drive by trying them.

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My Chevy truck has no problems playing data CD's burned as Audio CD's. Maybe you should consider a brand change?

Of couse it won't it's a MP3 player. I thought we covered this.

Are you serious?

That's how they sell music CD's.

 

cd

 

Maybe I should consider a brand change? Are you kidding. I just bought this car. It's a 2007 Ford Focus. Although, should my warranty run out, I definitely wouldn't replace it with a Ford CD player. Although, the point of all this isn't whether it plays MP3's or data CD-Rs. It played them fine. It's just if something goes wrong, and they find a data CD-R stuck in there, it would void my warranty. I really don't know what caused it to stop taking any CD. Probably just a malfunction.

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"It is recommended that homemade CDs be identified with permanent felt tip marker rather than adhesive lables."

This one IS from experience..... DO NOT use Cd's that you have applied labels to. Inside a car, in the summer, with the windows closed, it gets HOT.

 

The labels will "blister". Meaning that they will no longer be laying "flat" on the CD., they may "Wrinkle" Again from experience (Savage Garden's first album). Now... The CD with the blistered label is too "THICK" to be properly ejected.

 

There you have it.... Quality Cd's, NO labels..

 

Have a nice day... I'm off to crash the server... :D

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Change the brand of CD-Rs.

 

And I've seen more problems posted by people using Memorex discs than all other brands put together - what brand are you using, BTW?

 

Lynn

 

I started using Verbatim a long time ago when it was recommended on this list. Particularly for DVD's. And they worked fine in the Ford CD player while I was able to insert CD's. I really doubt any CD-R caused it to malfunction so you couldn't insert any CD, store bought or homemade. Something mechanical obviously went wrong. I also doubt they could void the warranty if I used a data CD-R that got stuck. But I'm going to play it safe and use music CD's from now on. It's a very nice CD/MP3 player. Very easy to use with large buttons. It does seem that music CD's usually are not on sale. I imagine due to the overhead cost of having to pay the record companies.

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