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Problem reading files contained in a folder


Martin100

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Hi. After a quick google search I was unable to find any mention of the problem I have, so I've come here in the hope that I may find an explanation and/or solution.

 

I just tried to back up a collection of high quality desktop background images that I have on my old Windows ME computer, using my Roxio Easy CD Creator 4 software. These are stored on my hard drive in a fairly simple folder structure. I chose the data cd option (not the drag and drop system), and simply added the parent folder for my desktop images to the CD layout. I then had the CD burnt. Finally I took the CDRW out of the drive, reinserted it, and went to 'My Computer' to check the integrity of the data.

 

A few files which had been copied outside of any folder were easily and quickly accessible. BUT, as soon as I tried to access any file I had burnt to the CDRW as inside a folder, my system slowed down a lot. The CDRW drive read/write light showed continuosly, System Monitor showed my processor was operating at 100% continously, and it took ages simply to view an image's properties. Actually viewing one of the JPEGS was impossible. I once got the top 3rd of an image to appear in Image Preview - that was all I could get. In the end I had to end a few tasks and restart the computer. When I tried to view the images from the CD again, I had exactly the same experience.

 

I burnt the same job over the top on the same CD again, but same problems occurred.

 

Then, I took another CDRW, ensured that all images (JPEGs) I wanted to copy were removed from their folders, and burnt that to CDRW, so that there were no folders being written to the CD. Hey presto, when it had finished I could read any file off the CDRW perfectly.

 

What is the problem with reading files written by Roxio to CDRW (under 'data CD') within folders? Do folders only work under the drag and drop format?

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If the idea behind this "backup" is to KEEP the data, NEVER use RW media - it will fade to blank over time (usually months, but can be days, weeks, or years).

 

If what you want is a "great-big floppy-disc", I'd suggest getting a Flash drive (aka Pen / Keychain / Jump / Thumb drive).

 

As to the specific of whether the program knows to pick up what is IN a file - I would point out burning was much more basic when Adaptec Easy CD Creator 4 was released on September 10th, 1999. The last software updates were in 2003, if I remember correctly.

 

Lynn

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Thanks for the advice on the longevity of RW data integrity. This use of a CDRW was as a very short term backup, pending the arrival of a new computer. I could and perhaps should have used a flash drive for this purpose.

 

However my question really relates to FOLDERS. I don't mean to shout, only to emphasise the subject of my question. Grateful as I am that you tried to help, unfortunately your answer did not use the word 'folders' at all, which is absolutely key to my question.

 

ECDC 4 quite happily wrote a 'data CD' (as it calls it) for me, where many of the files were in a folder or subfolder. (To be clear, once written, the CDRW would have files on it WITHIN A FOLDER STRUCTURE.) I was given no warnings that the use of folders was incompatible. Writing of the CD proceeded as normal, with no errors. Writing of the CD showed writing a folder as writing an extra file, so for example, writing 60 files to be contained inside a FOLDER on the CD appeared as writing 61 files to the CD (in the ECDC 4 summary of the writing process).

 

Once written, I checked the CDRW by trying to open files from it. I did this less than a minute after writing. I could 'see' all the files on the CD, just as if they were in C:\MyDocuments\. The files NOT IN a folder could be opened with no problems. HOWEVER, all those I had written contained in a folder appeared to be virtually un-openable from the CDRW. Also obtaining file properties for those files written inside a folder was very very slow.

 

This is not a new problem. I have had this before from ECDC 4. The use of FOLDERS only seem to work in the 'Direct CD' drag and drop format. Why won't folders work in the 'Data CD' format? I hear what you say about ECDC4 being a 1999 product, but arranging files in folders is not new, and it wasn't new in 1999 either.

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Sorry. I never used ECDC 4 so I don't know the quirks of the program or the answer to your question.

 

However, I wouldn't throw away that old computer until you get the images on your new computer.

 

I also do a backup to online storage ( I use XDrive.com, but there are many others that allow free storage for original files.) That way I can access my irreplaceable files from any location and even if the hard drive on my computer fails.

 

Hopefully, someone else will know the answer to your question, but your problems are almost over because ECDC 4 is probably won't work on your new computer.

 

Congratulations on your new computer! What are you getting? :)

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I can still write JPGs in folders on a CD with ECDC4, and then play them in my DVD player.

 

Martin100, I have never known of issues with writing files in subdirectories on data discs in Creator 4 - the only problem commonly seen is when you nest the directories too deeply, and then you break ISO CD writing standards.

 

Have you nested your directories deeply, so you have sub-sub-sub-sub-sub-sub-sub-sub directories? That will cause a fuss.

 

If you don't have them deeply nested, do you have a large number of files per folder, AND some sort of cataloging software running at the same time? That could also cause problems when your cataloging software gets tangles with your efforts to display the files.

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To ml: Thanks very much for the tip about xdrive.com, that sounds like a very useful service. As for the old computer, no it will not be thrown away even when the new computer is ready to use. The trouble with the old computer is that it worries me - it runs on ME and is becoming a little unstable. I really need to re-install the operating system, but with a new computer so close I hardly think it worth it. Also, after 4 years the hard drive failed and it is now getting on for another 4 years since it was replaced. I think it would be very ironic if I lost data just days before the new computer arrived!

 

New computer is a Dell Dimension 9200, (purchased with Dell 20" widescreen ultrasharp monitor), Intel E6600 chip, 4GB of 667Mhz RAM, nVidia 7900GS, 2*250 GB hard drives which I will be configuring in RAID 1 when it arrives. I will have the RAID 1 mirroring all the data, as well as an Acronis True Image backup image on each disk (to allow for the possibility that data become corrupted and RAID 1 simply mirrors the corruption). That is my idea anyway. Oh and the operating system will be Windows Vista Business. I'm pretty sure I understand the arguments against Vista, I (hope I) made an informed choice. I expect a general move to 64 bit in the next couple of years, so will probably send off for my copy of Vista 64 bit soon and keep it ready (if you get Vista, you can also get the other 'bit type' sent to you for a very small postage charge). I hope to virtualise Ubuntu as well and learn a bit about that. As for backups I may well start to use DVD-Rs - whether through Roxio or Nero or some other writing software I don't know yet.

 

 

To Brendon: Play JPEGs in your DVD player??? Don't you mean MPEGs? I'm just talking about trying to open the JPEGs by going to 'My Computer', double clicking the E:\drive (CDRW) and then opening the files from there.

 

Thanks for your suggestions! There was only one subdirectory. No other software other than system processes running at the time of writing and attempted read-back. As for the number of files there were 97 JPEGS of about 500KB each inside the main directory - could this be the problem with trying to open them?

 

Why does ECDC4 treat each folder as an extra file (in the writing to CDRW summary statistics)? That didn't inspire my confidence that it really knew what a folder was.

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To Brendon: Play JPEGs in your DVD player??? Don't you mean MPEGs? I'm just talking about trying to open the JPEGs by going to 'My Computer', double clicking the E:\drive (CDRW) and then opening the files from there.

 

Thanks for your suggestions! There was only one subdirectory. No other software other than system processes running at the time of writing and attempted read-back. As for the number of files there were 97 JPEGS of about 500KB each inside the main directory - could this be the problem with trying to open them?

 

Why does ECDC4 treat each folder as an extra file (in the writing to CDRW summary statistics)? That didn't inspire my confidence that it really knew what a folder was.

Hi Martin100,

 

The only reason I've been burning JPGs on CD is to play them in the DVD player. Most modern players and all DivX certified ones will automatically slideshow JPGs on data discs.

 

I have to store them in subdirectories to keep the pictures from various events separate, and this has never been a problem with Creator 4. Of course the files are all visible in the burner, or else I would not be able to verify them.

 

If you have auto-cataloging software running on your machine that might tangle things even with only 97 JPGs in a directory, although (forgive me please) when you're running Windows ME, almost anything is possible.

 

A folder is a file of sorts, though rather specialized, and takes up a file slot in contents tables so it's not wrong for Creator 4 to count it as one.

 

I'm sorry I don't have an answer to your problem, but I've never seen anyone have that problem before.

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If you have auto-cataloging software running on your machine that might tangle things even with only 97 JPGs in a directory, although (forgive me please) when you're running Windows ME, almost anything is possible.

Forgiven. I think Windows ME is ........... [fill with negative adjective of your choice]. I can't wait to see the back of it.

 

I shall do a couple of experiments once I have the safety of data being transferred to the new computer. I shall probably buy a 4GB flash drive (hadn't realised how cheap they are now), and use that to transfer the data. By the way, can anyone tell me a brand of flash drive (pen drive) which are constructed with quality in mind? The only one I've seen which didn't look tacky is the Iomega Mini (NOT micro-mini) which had a metal hoop that clipped around the length of the drive to keep the lid on. They seem to have discontinued this model.

 

I shall report back here if my experiments come to any conclusions as to the cause of my issue. I'm guessing a corrupted component of Windows Me, or possibly ECDC 4. Possibly a corruption in elements of Windows which interact with the CDFS.

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Forgiven. I think Windows ME is ........... [fill with negative adjective of your choice]. I can't wait to see the back of it.

 

When that came along and we all tried it, it was nicknamed very fast "Multiple Errors" and a roaring trade was done in removing it and rolling machines back to 98SE :lol:

 

Funny thing tho - Vista is fast gaining the nickname of "ME II" ;)

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When that came along and we all tried it, it was nicknamed very fast "Multiple Errors" and a roaring trade was done in removing it and rolling machines back to 98SE :lol:

 

Funny thing tho - Vista is fast gaining the nickname of "ME II" ;)

 

If a nickname of Multiple Errors II were justified, then I have really bad luck. That would mean the versions of Windows I'd have spent most time with would be 3.1, ME I and ME II!!

 

However having read about Vista quite a lot, I'm not sure it is justified. As I understand it, the reasons why people don't like Vista fall broadly into the following categories:

 

1. DRM - digital rights management heavily emphasises the rights of the media producer, while potentially paring back the rights of the media purchaser to the bare minimum. Media consumers feel somewhat trodden on by DRM which raises the possibility that (for example) you might not be able to 'buy' an item of media online, but only the right to use it for however long the producer sees fit, and no longer. So the concept of DRM does not delight me, I'll admit.

 

2. Vista is very resource hungry. Whether this is the result of better security, running the DRM, simply having a more 'advanced' OS or some combination of those I don't know. But lets face it, you've usually needed a new machine (faster chip and more RAM) for a happy experience with new versions of Windows. As I got Vista with a new machine this isn't a problem for me.

 

3. Vista doesn't suffer old peripherals with dodgy drivers gladly. I have sometimes read that poorly written drivers are the number one cause of system instability. If Microsoft wants to get a bit tough with driver writers and insist on some quality, that's fine by me. Vista has included some fairly major architectural changes from XP, causing some incompatibilities with things that worked OK on XP. But peripheral and software producers have had months and months to look at the Vista Beta. Some of them seem to have been a little slow on the uptake. Is that really Microsoft's fault? Perhaps MS didn't give software developers key information in a timely fashion, I don't know. Vista development did seem like a bit of a shambles with key components axed, and lots of delays.

 

4. Vista can seem a bit patronising. For example, when I went to release and renew ipconfig at the command line I found you have to first 'right click' on the 'Run' program and select 'run as administrator'. Vista will then double check for permission. It's all part of the 'user access control' policy of running programs at a relatively low level of security clearance unless asked to do otherwise - I didn't mind this. It will all be quite quick once I get used to it. Security will (hopefully) have improved as a result.

 

ME was called multiple errors because it would frequently give you a BSOD for no apparent reason. Tell me if I'm wrong, but I haven't read that Vista is unstable, in fact quite the opposite.

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# 2 is a big concern for me because video editing is also resource hungry and most reports that I've read say that you might not get a boost in performance if you've got a fairly new computer with XP.

 

A brand new Operating System like Vista where you've got to buy all new software and peripherals that are made specifically for Vista should be stable.

 

No pesky problems of being backward compatable with older software and hardware. :lol:

 

However, since you're replacing an ME computer that has to be several years old and probably doesn't have the hardware resources that you need, you didn't have much choice and it's got to be an improvement.

 

You did it the smart way. You bought a new computer with Vista preinstalled rather than trying to upgrade your older computer. It can be done, but in your case, a newer computer is usually cheaper.

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