Jump to content
  • Who's Online   0 Members, 0 Anonymous, 12 Guests (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

  • 0
Sign in to follow this  
macuserme

Cannot record on High Capacity Recordable 800MB 90MIN media (HC-R90)

Question

Hi,

 

I cannot record with Roxio Toast Titanium 8.01 (137) on Mac OS X 10.4.10 with Mac mini SuperDrive using TDK High Capacity Recordable 800MB 90MIN 40X Speed media (HC-R90).

 

I get the error: "There´s not enough free space on this disc: 76:52:58 are needed, 11:01:48 are available".

 

Yet, there is more than enough space indeed!!! No problem with 700MB capacity media.

 

Any way to fix it? IS THIS A BUG OF ROXIO TOAST 8 FOR MAC?

 

Here is the media:

 

http://www.tdk-europe.com/index.php?id=33&lang=en

http://www.amazon.co.uk/TDK-HC-R90CBA25-E-...h/dp/B0006VXHGW

 

Note that Nero on Windows recognizes it:

 

http://www.tdk-europe.com/en/product_extra...436odgjt12o8u84

 

Could Toast recognize it as well?

 

Thanks.

Edited by macuserme

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

10 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

The disc's available space is non-standard, thus software may not be compatible, as you have noticed. The line "check the compatibility of your CD-R/RW writer" implies that it may also be the burner that won't accept the size. My old Plextor drive could use 800 MB discs for 700 MB with Toast 5 or 6, though. Since I couldn't use the extra space then, my interest faded quickly, and with the advance of DVD-R, I haven't felt the need for the extra 100 MB...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
The disc's available space is non-standard, thus software may not be compatible, as you have noticed. The line "check the compatibility of your CD-R/RW writer" implies that it may also be the burner that won't accept the size. My old Plextor drive could use 800 MB discs for 700 MB with Toast 5 or 6, though. Since I couldn't use the extra space then, my interest faded quickly, and with the advance of DVD-R, I haven't felt the need for the extra 100 MB...

 

The question remains: does Toast support the TDK High Capacity Recordable 800MB 90MIN 40X Speed media (HC-R90)? THAT AND ONLY THAT.

 

Thanks.

Edited by macuserme

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Actually the question is, "Will the drive report correctly the size of the media to Toast?" Toast doesn't care what size media you use, but your drive sure does. Toast well let you write CD formats to DVD media if you really want to (proving it is indifferent to size of media).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
Actually the question is, "Will the drive report correctly the size of the media to Toast?" Toast doesn't care what size media you use, but your drive sure does. Toast well let you write CD formats to DVD media if you really want to (proving it is indifferent to size of media).

 

I do not think so. On the very same Mac, Toast does not recognize the 800 MB media, but Nero on top of Windows on top of Parallels Desktop on top of Mac OS X 10.4.10 does recognize it!!!

 

So, it seems that the culprit is Toast.

 

Again, does anyone know if Toast supports such media? In other words, has anyone used such media with Toast?

 

Thanks.

Edited by macuserme

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
I do not think so. On the very same Mac, Toast does not recognize the 800 MB media, but Nero on top of Windows on top of Parallels Desktop on top of Mac OS X 10.4.10 does recognize it!!!

 

So, it seems that the culprit is Toast.

 

Again, does anyone know if Toast supports such media? In other words, has anyone used such media with Toast?

 

Thanks.

I've read posts here in the past that Toast does not support burning more than 700 MB to CD-R media. If you use larger-capacity CDs Toast still only burns the maximum that fits standard CDs. Toast considers anything more than that as being overburning which it does not support. That's what I've read but have no way of confirming.

 

This makes sense to me because Toast emphasizes compatibility with multiple drives and systems. It would be out of character for Toast to burn to discs that are not universally readable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
I've read posts here in the past that Toast does not support burning more than 700 MB to CD-R media. If you use larger-capacity CDs Toast still only burns the maximum that fits standard CDs. Toast considers anything more than that as being overburning which it does not support. That's what I've read but have no way of confirming.

 

This makes sense to me because Toast emphasizes compatibility with multiple drives and systems. It would be out of character for Toast to burn to discs that are not universally readable.

 

Toast does see the 800 MB disks as having only 90 MB. That is a serious flaw of Toast. It is not a matter of overburn. These 800 MB disks have simply more space in the inner side, which is where the recording of the disk starts. So, no overburn at all, but as said more area to burn.

 

On the other hand, these disks seem compatible with all CD players. So, no problem there either. The problem is of Toast and only of Toast. What surprises me is that such flaw has not yet been addressed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

800MB CD's are non-standard and not supported. 800MB CD will not play in most CD Players, DVD Players (incase of VCD/SVCD) and can not be read back on a large number of drives. Many drives will not read overburned disc and you can lose your data. If you burn your data on the drive you have, the drive breaks and you buy a new one, there is a very high chance the new drive can't read the disc.

 

It is not a flaw in Toast. Toast doesn't not support overburn which is required to burn over the standard CD size. Overburn can destroy a drive and the disc are not reliable. Use Nero if you want. They have always burned non-standard CD/DVD which often fail to work correct.

Edited by freshburn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
800MB CD's are non-standard and not supported. 800MB CD will not play in most CD Players, DVD Players (incase of VCD/SVCD) and can not be read back on a large number of drives. Many drives will not read overburned disc and you can lose your data. If you burn your data on the drive you have, the drive breaks and you buy a new one, there is a very high chance the new drive can't read the disc.

 

It is not a flaw in Toast. Toast doesn't not support overburn which is required to burn over the standard CD size. Overburn can destroy a drive and the disc are not reliable. Use Nero if you want. They have always burned non-standard CD/DVD which often fail to work correct.

 

Thanks for the information. Then, please let me get things right. Which is the "standard" size for CD disks? Because Toast recognizes and records both 650 and 700 MB CD disks. As far as I know, only the 650 MB CD disks are the "standard" CD disks. Or am I wrong? Thanks again.

Edited by macuserme

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

CD-R and CD-RW started out as 650MB. CD-RW continue to be 650MB, however, CD-R were increased to 700MB. The standard supports both 650 and 700MB CD-R and I believe that 700MB is more common any more.

 

800 and even 900MB CD have been made, but they have never became part of the official spec. Most drives, even with over burn can't burn a full disc. The main problem results with trying to read back the data, especially if you are burning an Audio CD.

 

With data, if a drive burns 800MB or more, but another drive can only read 750MB, it because a problem when you want your data back.

 

Just be careful using a disc like this overburned, especially for important data.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
CD-R and CD-RW started out as 650MB. CD-RW continue to be 650MB, however, CD-R were increased to 700MB. The standard supports both 650 and 700MB CD-R and I believe that 700MB is more common any more.

 

800 and even 900MB CD have been made, but they have never became part of the official spec. Most drives, even with over burn can't burn a full disc. The main problem results with trying to read back the data, especially if you are burning an Audio CD.

 

With data, if a drive burns 800MB or more, but another drive can only read 750MB, it because a problem when you want your data back.

 

Just be careful using a disc like this overburned, especially for important data.

 

Thanks. You rock! All clarified now. I have also searched Wikipedia (for the records):

 

-------------------------------------

CD-ROM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CD-ROM

 

CD-R

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CD-R

A standard CD-R is a 1.2 mm thick disc made of polycarbonate with a 120 mm or 80 mm diameter. It has a storage capacity of 74 minutes of audio or 650 MiB of data. CD-R/RWs are also available with capacities of 79 minutes, 59 seconds and 74 frames (marketed as 80 minutes) /736,966,656 bytes (702 MiB), which they achieve by burning at the maximum allowable tolerances specified in the Orange Book CD-R/CD-RW standards. Most CD-Rs on the market have an 80 minute capacity. There are also 90 minute/790 MiB and 99 minute/870 MiB discs, although they are rare. Some drives use special techniques to write more data onto a given disc, such as Plextor's GigaRec allowing as much as 1.2 GiB onto a 99 minute disc. Also, due to the limitations of the data structures in the ATIP (see below), 90 and 99 minute blanks will identify as 80 minute ones and have to be burned using the "overburn" options in the CD recording software.

 

Red Book (audio CD standard)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Book_%28a..._CD_standard%29

Capacity: up to 700 MB

 

Yellow Book (CD standard)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_Book_%...OM_standards%29

 

Rainbow Books

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orange_Book_%28CD_standard%29

-------------------------------------

 

CONCLUSION:

 

Red Book (audio CD standard) Capacity up to 700 MB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×