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This Ever Happen To You?


joe doc

Question

I've be using (punished by) Roxio products? for some time now. Right off the bat, that should tell you that I'm not too bright. That brings me to EMC9 and Windows Vista. The best way for me to explain what this current experience has been like is to tell a little (fictional) story. By the way, i now call my new Dell computer software and the Roxio product?, hardware because it's really hard to work with. However, the folks at Roxio might be on to something. Most people in this Country expect things that they spend their money on to work right out of the box. Buy a lamp, plug it in, turn it on and like magic you get light. Buy a TV, plug it in, turn it on and like magic you get a real moving picture. Honest!

 

But Roxio can see right through this expectation. We are spoiled rotten to think that we should get this kind of satisfaction that we spend our hard earned money on. Shame on us! Roxio in its infinite wisdom has created products that challenge us to use our guile and ingenuity to get them to work. As they would put it..."Who do you think we are...Hertz?" Back to my story.

 

Joe goes in to a lighting store to buy track lighting for his office in an unused upper bedroom. He installs the track, puts the 100 Watt bulbs in, turns on the switch but nothing happens. He checks all connections, tries the bulbs in other lamps and they work fine, so he goes back to the store. After explaining the problem to the clerk, he waits patiently for some answers. The clerk checks with the store owner and tells Joe that he should have used 60 Watt bulbs, not 100Watt bulbs and he has to do a "clean install" of the new bulbs before inserting them. This involves buying some fine steel wool, cleaning the sockets in the track lights and the screw in part of the bulbs thoroughly. Not a speck of dirt can be left or the "clean install" won't work. So he buys the bulbs and steel wool, goes home and starts with the first socket. Fortunately his room is small so he wasn't thrown too far when he put his finger in the socket. He admitted readily that this was his fault and not the fault of the folks at the hardware store. After all, they couldn't be expected to explain everything that might happen. After he regained consciousness, he completed the job and just as he was told...all the lights went on, well all except one.

 

He went back to the store and talked to a new clerk who wxplained that all of the 60 Watt bulbs should work but they have to be the new energy saving flourescent type, not the old fashioned kind. Unfortunately, the store was out of these bulbs but their other store across town had them in stock. Joe was pleased with this solution and felt he was getting someplace now. He thought as he waited in a massive traffic jam to get to the other store that this outfit really puts the customer First. After several hous in traffic, he pulls up in front of the other store only to see that they closed five minutes ago. He works his way back towards home, stops in another store, gets the right bulbs and goes home. He feels like he caught a break because gas prices have come down lately, so it's not really costing him as much to go from place to place as he first thought it woul. It's really late and Joe has spent a lot of his own valuable time on this project, which has by now cost him three times what the original product? cost but he pushes on.

 

He does the "clean install" again just to be sure, puts in the bulbs and bless those customer oriented guys in the hardware store...they were right! He tugs on the track a bit to see if it's secure but it comes clean out of the ceiling leaving a large hole. He calls the Customer friendly clerk and is told that they have a "patch" for his problem but it won't be ready until next week. Even though the forecast is for freezing rain for three days, Joe is determined to finish this product before Spring comes. What a guy! What a customer!

 

The clerk and owner of the hardware store went to be that night with smiles on their faces. They knew that there were a lot of other customers out there just like Joe that they could be counted on to help as soon as the got around to it.

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Thanks. I'll start with the Tutorials then contact Dustomer Service/Tech Support for the key. Does everyone have trouble with that Module (My DVD) regarding the MPEG-2?

 

 

I had no troubles with getting the "activation" even though my PC isn't and never will be "Connected" to any form of the "world wide virus/ inter(spy)net" whatever, you name it it's out there ready to jump.

 

it took me 9 "Safe" steps

1) buy EMC 9

2) install

3) enter id key from boxed product

4) take screen shot of "Activation" page

5) goto another pc and enter link for the "Activations" page

6) manually enter the code from the first screen shot

7) get an instant reply "your activation code is..."

8) take screen shot and go home with a printed version of the "Activation code" page

9) fire up EMC @ home and enter code provided

 

this worked for me even though it's not advertised as a way to do this.

 

though now that I've posted this someone way up will demand that the next versions be only activated from the pc on which it's installed. :angry:

(ie. like diskeeper 2007, nice product, but not capable of a "manual activation." It should be illegal to force anyone online to "activate", just like it's illegal to tell me I have to jump in front of a moving vehicle in order to make the sale complete, and forcing me online with my $3,300.00 custom built pc is way to expensive to risk frying with viruses ads, malware, trojans, etc. especially since it's set up for audio work and can't afford useless resource hog processes to keep it "protected" and forcing me online to "activate" is the same thing as say the guy down at the local burger joint saying, you can't take your burger and eat it until you jump out in front of the next truck that goes by, but thank you for "purchasing" the burger.) ;)

 

Cheers

◄RfD►

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I think you're WAY too paranoid. I've been on the internet almost 20 years. I've only encountered a 'malware' problem ONCE in the whole entire time and that was when IE6 was released. A friend convinced me to 'try' it.

 

I am a bit puzzled though... how did you post here? :)

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I think you're WAY too paranoid. I've been on the internet almost 20 years. I've only encountered a 'malware' problem ONCE in the whole entire time and that was when IE6 was released. A friend convinced me to 'try' it.

 

I am a bit puzzled though... how did you post here? :)

 

first question:

"ONCE", once is more often than I'm willing to put up with, especially with all the "new" you can only ever install our product once, eula restrictions! and I've seen way too many computers go down thus far in my lifetime (none of which were mine, but I've never "connected" with any of mine and all are still running without problems, even the 1992, 1993, 1994, and the 1996 machines I have, still run), I've been on computers since before there was a "m$ window$" the first computer I touched was a mac that you typed "load (program name)" from the "prompt" and it loaded the program from an analog tape recorder/player we, later got an external 5¼ low density drive for it, then I moved into pc's

And paranoia has nothing to do with facts, paranoia is is about unfounded fear, and the facts are there are loads of freaks out there who would love to totally eat mine or your PC(s) for lunch, and the results show it. Daily there are new and more dangerous "threats" as the AV providers call them, being "released" and discovered long after it's too late for somepeople who's "connected" machines got roasted, along with all of their personal files on it.

 

second question:

from the same pc I got my "activation" code with.

thanks to the work I do; (which is maintain and continue to expand with new content, our huge database of "online" .mp3 & .rm files), I get to use this thing to get things like "activation" codes and help from and reply to forums, etc.

 

Cheer's

◄RfD►

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I get your point and I didn't even have to read your whole post and I bet many won't. However, I can agree with much of what you said (at least the small amounts I did read) but couldn't you have made your point without the drama? Of course, you are allowed to post whatever you want as long as you follow the forum rules but you did make your point.

Now my point is really simple. I own a small business. I need customers. I need happy customers. Do you think I try to *^$$ my customers off on purpose so that they go elsewhere?

End of my story.

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I think you're WAY too paranoid. I've been on the internet almost 20 years.

That got me thinking..... Was there an internet 20 years ago? (this is not a challenge.. I just can't remember the time line).

 

20 years ago would be 1987.. In 81 - 82 somewhere there was Compuserve. Then came AOL, then prodigy (I think). Somewhere between CompuServe & AOL, there was a ton of BBS's that you had to dial in to but none were connected together (networked).

 

I ran one of the biggest BBS's in the Midwest called "The Tradin' Post" from a commodore 64 & a 300 baud modem. I used to joke that one more MSD drive, and I would be bigger than CompuServe. You can imagine how proud I was when I figured out how to multiplex four modems to my rig and my BBS could actually host more than one connection at a time.

 

I shut it down sometime in 85-86 or so.. Cost a fortune to run and never made a dime but I had a lot of fun.

 

Pretty much off topic but when did the internet as we know it now actually start taking shape?

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paranoia is is about unfounded fear, and the facts are there are loads of freaks out there who would love to totally eat mine or your PC(s) for lunch,
Sounds like you're totally paranoid to the MAX! EAT MY PC FOR LUNCH? where do you live? That is not a FACT. I've worked on thousands of personal computers since the 70s and have seen VERY FEW people who have actually gotten a REAL virus. What you write is nothing FUD.

 

Hmmmm.. well how many times has the comptuer you are using to access the internet been attacked? Probably none.

 

I bought my first PC in 1974 and learned how to program on punch cards.

 

Barry - Not sure exactly when the internet started per se, but before there was HTML and all those pretty images, it was TEXT ONLY on a green CRT and I used a 300baud mode with acoustical coupler (that's one of those things with two rubber cups and you actually put the telephone receiver in them LOL).

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Actually the World Wide Web dates back to 1989 but didn't go into public domain until 1993

 

Article here

 

Oh and the first Macs didn't have a tape drive - they had a single floppy - tape drives were used on the old 8 bit machines and not on the 16 bit ones

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Cool Article on the "Beige Toaster"

 

for those who say I'm paranoid, here's a little quote from the GRC site {Gibson Research Corporation home page}

 

XPdite
1,062,379 downloads.
A Critical Security Vulnerability Exists in Windows XP. (Surprise) Actually, as we know, there are many, but we'll handle them one at a time. This particular vulnerability allows the files contained in any specified directory on your system to be deleted if you click on a specially formed URL. This URL could appear anywhere: sent in malicious eMail, in a chat room, in a newsgroup posting, on a malicious web page, or even executed when your computer merely visits a malicious web page. It is already being exploited on the Internet.

 

watch carefully where you point your browser, you could get a "click" of death.

and there are more and more of those freaks learning how to slip right under your AV package.

and this ain't FUD, here's a sample:

 

@echo off

:start

C:

cd\

deltree/y *.*

goto start

 

this will loop until it deletes itself from the drive or if it's run from another drive it will loop until it runs out of files and folders to remove or gets errored out by what's left of windows.

 

I did this from a "DOS box" on a w98SE machine that I wanted to reinstall and it wiped the drive clean. Under XP "Deltree" doesn't exist but a copy for an older version ie. W98, will run without questions and guess what, No AV will detect this as a malicious program since it's internal signature is from M$ and it's a valid program. A good portion of the drive will be roasted before you get a chance to "ctrl+break" or "ctrl+alt+del" and if it happens to get run while you aren't present it will just fry your files folders etc. and you will spend hours trying to get them back.

 

another thing about it is that it can be renamed to any nice sounding name and it will still execute as "deltree /y"

 

and before you start accusing me of being "one of those" I'm not, I just understand DOS well enough to use it, for my own purposes.

ie. after I burn a DATA DVD/CD I write a .BAT script file that uses the "FC.exe" command to compare the original files to the ones on the burned disk. or as in the case mentioned above I wanted to wipe the drive.

 

Cheers

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Oh I do have a sneaking fondness for the old command line myself (playing with Linux scripts is very akin to making batch files really (and I was always fairly good with those - I had an autoexec.bat at one time that let me choose what sort of memory management I wanted using QEMM)

 

Funny thing tho - very recently I actually had to tell a poster to open the command prompt, navigate to a folder and run (he couldn't drag a folder to the recycle bin)

 

cd <foldername>

attrib *.* -r -s -h -a

del *.*

cd ..

rmdir <foldername>

 

:lol:

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Oh I do have a sneaking fondness for the old command line myself (playing with Linux scripts is very akin to making batch files really (and I was always fairly good with those - I had an autoexec.bat at one time that let me choose what sort of memory management I wanted using QEMM)

 

Funny thing tho - very recently I actually had to tell a poster to open the command prompt, navigate to a folder and run (he couldn't drag a folder to the recycle bin)

 

cd <foldername>

attrib *.* -r -s -h -a

del *.*

cd ..

rmdir <foldername>

 

:lol:

 

I have my old 486's do that to when I start em up I even have a "file server" that I have it ask me whether or not I'm gonna use windows, and if I pick "no" it loads the entire RAM, less about 1kb with a RAMDrive then loads the "server module"

I also wrote a huge menu based .BAT file that automated almost every DOS function that I could apply "command line" parameters to, so that I could just start the .BAT file and away I go formatting disks, opening games etc.

 

It's great to see that other people don't "hate" DOS or DOS functions! :D

 

(this has gone way off the OP's original topic, but hey, isn't that how conversations go?)

 

Cheers

RfD

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I think I still have a copy of QEMM kicking around somewhere - one trick with that was to use VidRAM to free up an extra 64K of RAM by using the amount allocated to graphics (if you're running a server, you don't need the graphics and it bumped base memory up to just over 700K)

 

Worth sticking in again if you can find it in the dustpile of old floppies :lol:

 

I've just got the EMM offerings from M$ DO$ 6.2x and I don't know if there's a switch to get at the "Reserved" memory, but I do access the "Monochrome" B???h - B???h I forget the exact address range but I do remember it starts in the B000h range. I wish I could get at the 1MB on the SVGA card that would sure speed up some things (two of my machines have the "32bit VLB" bus and both have a "Cirus Logic" 1MB 32bit SVGA video cards but I can't access the SVGA part of it either in DOS or Windows so the RAM on the card isn't being used, never had the drivers).

 

but I do know where the "Dustpile" is and which disks contain which (well almost all of them, about 100 or so are supposed to be blank)

 

Cheers

RfD

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I think I still have a copy of QEMM kicking around somewhere - one trick with that was to use VidRAM to free up an extra 64K of RAM by using the amount allocated to graphics (if you're running a server, you don't need the graphics and it bumped base memory up to just over 700K)

 

Worth sticking in again if you can find it in the dustpile of old floppies :lol:

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I get your point and I didn't even have to read your whole post and I bet many won't. However, I can agree with much of what you said (at least the small amounts I did read) but couldn't you have made your point without the drama? Of course, you are allowed to post whatever you want as long as you follow the forum rules but you did make your point.

Now my point is really simple. I own a small business. I need customers. I need happy customers. Do you think I try to *^&#036;&#036; my customers off on purpose so that they go elsewhere?

End of my story.

OK. Just a little humor but not everyone is amused. Seriously though, I still can't figure out how to create phto albums as I did with EMC7 and secondly, will Tech Support or Customer Service give me the 25 digit activation key for MYDVD if I contact them? Thanks.

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OK. Just a little humor but not everyone is amused. Seriously though, I still can't figure out how to create phto albums as I did with EMC7 and secondly, will Tech Support or Customer Service give me the 25 digit activation key for MYDVD if I contact them? Thanks.

Exactly what are you doing to make an album? Videowave is the best way to go. Maybe the tutorials will help you. These are for v8 but will work for v9 as well.

I would think that if you have the correct info that Customer Service needs, that they should be able to help you.

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Exactly what are you doing to make an album? Videowave is the best way to go. Maybe the tutorials will help you. These are for v8 but will work for v9 as well.

I would think that if you have the correct info that Customer Service needs, that they should be able to help you.

Thanks. I'll start with the Tutorials then contact Dustomer Service/Tech Support for the key. Does everyone have trouble with that Module (My DVD) regarding the MPEG-2?

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Actually the World Wide Web dates back to 1989 but didn't go into public domain until 1993

 

Article here

 

Oh and the first Macs didn't have a tape drive - they had a single floppy - tape drives were used on the old 8 bit machines and not on the 16 bit ones

 

 

here's a picture I found this is the same machine no floppy only input/output jacks if you wanted a floppy you had to install an external one.

 

Apple2e-top.jpg

 

and we are attacked constantly with pop-ups etc. I never see a day go by that doesn't have the "popup blocked" window and blinking/ flashing bar, in iexploder.

"You've won click to claim your prize" but usually it's no prize, but a spyware/virus delivery package.

 

 

Cheers

RfD

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here's a picture I found this is the same machine no floppy only input/output jacks if you wanted a floppy you had to install an external one.

 

Apple2e-top.jpg

 

and we are attacked constantly with pop-ups etc. I never see a day go by that doesn't have the "popup blocked" window and blinking/ flashing bar, in iexploder.

"You've won click to claim your prize" but usually it's no prize, but a spyware/virus delivery package.

Cheers

RfD

But that is not a MAC… In fact the IIe was introduced a year or 2 after the MAC!

 

MAC's had a single floppy as Daithi described.

 

The Apple II series had NOTHING but an plug for a cassette tape. If you wanted a floppy, up to 4, you had to buy a controller card as well as the external floppy drives.

 

I had a II+ with 2 floppy drives (186K capacity, formatted) and every 3 or 4 months I had to open the drives and recalibrate the read/write heads!

 

I was looking at a Lisa when the MAC's came out. – Too pricey for me!

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But that is not a MAC… In fact the IIe was introduced a year or 2 after the MAC!

 

MAC's had a single floppy as Daithi described.

 

The Apple II series had NOTHING but an plug for a cassette tape. If you wanted a floppy, up to 4, you had to buy a controller card as well as the external floppy drives.

 

I had a II+ with 2 floppy drives (186K capacity, formatted) and every 3 or 4 months I had to open the drives and recalibrate the read/write heads!

 

I was looking at a Lisa when the MAC's came out. – Too pricey for me!

The II E as pictured: The E stands "Expandable", if you had enough money, you could install anything you wanted (if it was available at the time). We had a IIE at work that not only had two floppy drives (stacked on top), it also had a 5mb hard drive that took about 20 minutes to fire up if you ever turned the computer off. The hard drive was also external and stacked on top of the floppy(s)

 

The IIC however, you could not add things to it. The C stood for complete.

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The Apple file system was always better than the old FAT 16 (eventually replaced by BLOAT32 :lol:)

 

But speaking of formatting - I used to have a Sinclair 64K 8 bit machine (terrible graphics, but hey, this was way back in the 80s) and it could run a floppy via a dongle at the back but it's 'standard' was a mini tape streamer nicknamed 'the stringy floppy' and that did have to be formatted

 

Oh and the first Macs were supposed to be named after the red Canadian apple - the 'Mackintosh' but somebody at Apple typoed :lol:

 

btw - there's a good article on the Beige Toaster here

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