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Reading Erased DVD+RW


Lubens

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After erasing my Imation DVD+RW disk, my WindowsXP Windows Explorer gives the message “Windows can not read from this disk. It might be corrupted or using a format not compatible with Windows”. Please advise.

Umm... it seems to me that this would be a normal condition upon erasing any RW disc, CD or DVD. Once it's erased, it shouldn't be readable. The only thing you should be able to do with that disc is write new data using a DVD burning application like Creator Classic, or Disc Copier. Windows knows not what to do with a "blank" DVD disc, not even how much unused space may be available.

 

I guess I'm not seeing the problem, unless EMC is telling you there's a problem with the disc. Please clarify.

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The disc is probably damaged and needs replaced.

 

RW discs have a very limited write/erase cycle unfortunately

 

You did do an erase and not a format didn't you?

 

I did do an erase. I haven't yet figured out how to format a dvd. This happens with all RW DVD's I've tried. I believe I'll stick with basic single use dvd's.

 

Thanks for your reply.

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I did do an erase. I haven't yet figured out how to format a dvd. This happens with all RW DVD's I've tried. I believe I'll stick with basic single use dvd's.

 

Thanks for your reply.

You don't want to be "formatting" discs, as that's something you do to use packet writing software, which seems to be on it's way out. v10 doesn't include one anymore, and word is other software makers are dropping it also.

 

Maybe Windows is giving you that message after you erased it because it's empty and has nothing on it when you try to look at it.

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If this is happening with all RW media one or 2 problems exist that must be fixed!

 

Your burner needs a Firmware update.

 

Your media is really a refuge from a dumpster… Stick to something like Verbatim, TDK, Sony.

 

My DVD RW media is going strong after 3+ years and hundreds of writes/erases.

 

Still, never use to keep the only copy of anything you value!!!!!!! It is life limited media and has died with no prior warning!

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If this is happening with all RW media one or 2 problems exist that must be fixed!

 

Your burner needs a Firmware update.

 

Your media is really a refuge from a dumpster… Stick to something like Verbatim, TDK, Sony.

 

My DVD RW media is going strong after 3+ years and hundreds of writes/erases.

 

Still, never use to keep the only copy of anything you value!!!!!!! It is life limited media and has died with no prior warning!

 

Thanks for the tips. I'll check the firmware.

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'My DVD RW media is going strong after 3+ years and hundreds of writes/erases"

 

That could be because nothing is saved for a prolong period of time. You erase and start over hundreds of times in three years means you have been only going a few days at a time. Save to one and store it for 6 months or better and see what happens, if still no problems, you are a rare lucky one.

If you save it and don't touch it for a few months and then go back, you will probably find, you can not read it. I threw all of my RWs away after many many times of trying to read them after several months. I was using them for Tif file back ups and every 6 months or so would atempt to do another back up. Use an external USB Hard drive and CD-Rs for it now.

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Then you don't understand how optical media is written… Reuse is much harder on optical media than write and store. This is because the same burn test area and TOC areas are always being written/erased/written. You wear out the chemicals that allow this to happen. (in magnetic media, floppies, rewriting tended to 'refresh' the media)

 

I have older CD-RWs that have been stored for as much as 4 years with no data lose. – But these were old CD's and were manufactured before the 2000 change.

 

2000 is an 'about' year when manufactures found a cheaper dye to use. Less durable but cheaper for them!

 

In any case I think we are in complete agreement that whether you make multiple burn/erases or store for long term, if you use RW media, you are putting your data at risk!

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RW media is media to stay away from. They start to ROT in a matter of days.

 

What ROT means is simply, you are sending a laser beam thru an acrylic layer and it burns a small dot into a dye. The DYE used in RW media is different from the +r and -R media. SOon the dye starts to deterioate and the small dot becomes bigger and causes misreads and errors. Bulk CDs and DVDs are real cheap now, so buy them and forget RW media all together. Refer to links in my post in the CD LABEL thread to read more about this or simply google DISC ROT and read from numerous sources.

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