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rjohnson14

Sonic DLA problems

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I am setting up 6 new Lenovo pc's with WinXP Pro w/SP2. They came preinstalled with Sonic DLA. I am trying to use this to copy files to a CD-RW using a batch file. When I try to format the CD it processes about 3/4 of the way and then failes with a media failure error. I am using brand new (brand name) CD's and I have gotten the same failure on three different machines and CDs.

 

If I continue to try to use the cd, I can do a quick format and it seems to work, however as lomg s the CD is in the drive, the machine runs extremely slowly, and I cannot access the properties for the Drive. I am assuming this is a result of the first problem but thought it was worth mentioning.

 

Any Ideas,

Roger

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If the idea is to transfer files between computers, I'd suggest using a Flash drive (aka Thumb / Pen / Jump / Keychain drive).

 

If the idea is archiving, use a Sessions-based program - I assume if you got DLA, you got the rest of the RecordNow suite, and that includes the ability to make a Data Disc. If not, use the built-in WinXP burning capability.

 

You can also transfer data by using a Sessions-based program and an RW disc which can be erased afterward, but Flash drives are more reliable.

 

If none of the above is relevant, then I'm missing some major point in my understanding.

 

Lynn

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GO to IBM support site and look for " Multimedia Center for Think Offerings". You might also try running IBM Update Connector that came with the computer. It will update all programs specifically for your computer automatically.

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If the idea is to transfer files between computers, I'd suggest using a Flash drive (aka Thumb / Pen / Jump / Keychain drive).

 

If the idea is archiving, use a Sessions-based program - I assume if you got DLA, you got the rest of the RecordNow suite, and that includes the ability to make a Data Disc. If not, use the built-in WinXP burning capability.

 

You can also transfer data by using a Sessions-based program and an RW disc which can be erased afterward, but Flash drives are more reliable.

 

If none of the above is relevant, then I'm missing some major point in my understanding.

 

Lynn

 

Lynn,

Thanks! I am aware of the alternatives, but the fact remains that I cannot do a full format on a new CD!! That's the problem.

 

Is there a way to use Record Now from a command line within a batch file? If so I have not figured it out!

 

Thanks,

Roger

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Lynn,

Thanks! I am aware of the alternatives, but the fact remains that I cannot do a full format on a new CD!! That's the problem.

 

Is there a way to use Record Now from a command line within a batch file? If so I have not figured it out!

 

Thanks,

Roger

I don't know of any current applications that have a command-line type interface for what you seem to want to do. Have you tried any different brands of discs? You've got similar machines, with common drives (I presume), and all are failing using the same set of discs. I'd suggest buying a few discs of other brands to see if that helps.

 

If you're not aware though, what you're doing, formatting the discs, is called packet writing, and it's considered the most unreliable way of writing to optical media. Give us some more details of what you need to do, and how valuable your data is, and maybe we can come up with some alternatives for you.

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I don't know of any current applications that have a command-line type interface for what you seem to want to do. Have you tried any different brands of discs? You've got similar machines, with common drives (I presume), and all are failing using the same set of discs. I'd suggest buying a few discs of other brands to see if that helps.

 

If you're not aware though, what you're doing, formatting the discs, is called packet writing, and it's considered the most unreliable way of writing to optical media. Give us some more details of what you need to do, and how valuable your data is, and maybe we can come up with some alternatives for you.

 

What I am trying to do is move a perfectly good application which has been running fine for many months using Roxio drag-to-disk (yes, Roxio's version of packet writing) and move it to machines which have Sonic DLA. Evidently Sonic is so crappy that all everyone wants to do give me alternatives rather than make the software work as advertised. No wonder they give it away free!!!! I guess I'll go buy Roxio for my new machines.

 

Roger

Edited by rjohnson14

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Packet-Writing APPEARS to work like a "great-big floppy-disc", but unlike the floppy it is NOT a standardized format. Different companies have built different ways of meeting the reading specs (which ARE standardized), which are incompatible with each other - and often incompatible with different Versions of the same program.

 

THAT is what your problem is.

 

Lynn

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What I am trying to do is move a perfectly good application which has been running fine for many months using Roxio drag-to-disk (yes, Roxio's version of packet writing) and move it to machines which have Sonic DLA. Evidently Sonic is so crappy that all everyone wants to do give me alternatives rather than make the software work as advertised. No wonder they give it away free!!!! I guess I'll go buy Roxio for my new machines.

 

Roger

Have you tried the suggestion of getting some other discs to try? It's terribly common for some drives to simply not get along with a particular batch or brand of discs. That is a perfectly valid suggestion and was there for your benefit, as well as the warning. If it's a disc/drive issue, then Drag-To-Disc won't fix it.

 

If you've had good luck with packet writing, more power to you. Many folks have used it successfully for awhile, and then been burned when it failed, that's the reason I asked for more details on your application. If all you're doing is writing files for transfer, or short term use, and it's not you're only copy of the file, then that's a perfectly valid use of packet writing. More information helps us help you, so why short change us, and yourself?

Edited by d_deweywright

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