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rodcon660

Not Able To Make Copy Of Project I Burned And Finalized

Question

I made a movie a while back and I finalized it onto a dvd. I tried to go back and make a copy using disc copier and dvd builder. I keep getting different errors. One of them said insert source disc. Thanks for any help I can get on this. Also I am looking to buy a digital camcorder around the $500.00 price range and wondering if anyone had any suggestions for a good camera.

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Guest mlpasley
I made a movie a while back and I finalized it onto a dvd. I tried to go back and make a copy using disc copier and dvd builder. I keep getting different errors. One of them said insert source disc. Thanks for any help I can get on this. Also I am looking to buy a digital camcorder around the $500.00 price range and wondering if anyone had any suggestions for a good camera.

 

Can you give us some idea of the errors that you're getting?

 

For the digital camcorder, you cannot beat the internet for research. Look for a high effective pixel rate. The quality of the picture that you can capture doesn't seem to have anything to do with the price of the camcorder. I personally think that digital tapes are the way to go because from what I've seen you get a higher resolution than the DVDs, but that's a personal preference.

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I made a movie a while back and I finalized it onto a dvd. I tried to go back and make a copy using disc copier and dvd builder. I keep getting different errors. One of them said insert source disc. Thanks for any help I can get on this. Also I am looking to buy a digital camcorder around the $500.00 price range and wondering if anyone had any suggestions for a good camera.

I feel like a goof the problem was those darn stick on labels. I tore the label off and made a perfect copy. I guess the label was interfering with the mechanics of the dvd rom. Thanks and I also welcome anymore recommendations for a digital camcorder.

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I feel like a goof the problem was those darn stick on labels. I tore the label off and made a perfect copy. I guess the label was interfering with the mechanics of the dvd rom. Thanks and I also welcome anymore recommendations for a digital camcorder.

 

You might seriously consdier if you REALLY want lables, altho they are not as potentially devastating with DVD media as CD media - where they can remove the recording layer if removed. There seem to be two camps - those who believe in labels and those who don't.

 

Lynn

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You might seriously consdier if you REALLY want lables, altho they are not as potentially devastating with DVD media as CD media - where they can remove the recording layer if removed. There seem to be two camps - those who believe in labels and those who don't.

 

Lynn

 

Lynn, this may be a stupid question but ... How can removing the labels also remove the recording layer? After all the are on oppositie sides of the CD. Personally I never use labels since I fell they can upset the balance of the spinning CD unless applied perfectly.

Edited by myguggi

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Lynn, this may be a stupid question but ... How can removing the labels also remove the recording layer? After all the are on oppositie sides of the CD. Personally I never use labels since I fell they can upset the balance of the spinning CD unless applied perfectly.

 

Hi Walt,

 

On a CD-R or RW the recording layer is put onto a strong plastic disc, a very thin reflective layer is put on top of the recording layer, and a layer of paint and/or laquer is put over the top of that to keep the air out.

 

It's the paint/laquer and the reflective layer which get ruined so effectively and easily when you rip a label off.

 

Once you've damaged the reflective layer, the CD don't play no more. The recording layer (dye or alloy) is usually undisturbed, but by this time the question is a bit academic.

 

With a DVD the recording layer or laters are sandwiched between two plastic discs, so the data is protected a lot better from mechanical damage. Their main problem isn't surface damage, but stressing the sandwich and causing the two discs to separate (de-lamination).

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Lynn, this may be a stupid question but ... How can removing the labels also remove the recording layer? After all the are on oppositie sides of the CD. Personally I never use labels since I fell they can upset the balance of the spinning CD unless applied perfectly.

 

Brendon gave you the short, clarified Version.

 

Here is a link to the Byers Guide (by Fred Byers) for the long, detailed Version:

http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub121/contents.html

 

Lynn

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Thank you Brendon and Lynn. Now I understand better the physical makeup of CDs and DVDs.

 

You're welcome, Walt.

 

I once recieved a CD-R labeled with a Post-It note, and all the stuff on top came up with the note. (It was recognized as "Please insert an audio compact disc".) That's why I thought the recording layer was itentical to the reflective layer.

 

Lynn

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