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vimoksha

Fresh Installation Today

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I was using Nero. Any CD copied, could not be opened in other computers. Tired of it I uninstalled Nero and today I have happily installed the Easy CD Creator 5 Basic. The prog was supplied by a computer magazine in its free CD. Ok. I have copied the files from MyDocuments to a CD without any hassle. And the CD is opening in other computers also. But the icon on the task bar has a red circle with a slash telling me " DirectCD - No supported drive! ". How to remove the red circle? This is irritating to look at!

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I was using Nero. Any CD copied, could not be opened in other computers. Tired of it I uninstalled Nero and today I have happily installed the Easy CD Creator 5 Basic. The prog was supplied by a computer magazine in its free CD. Ok. I have copied the files from MyDocuments to a CD without any hassle. And the CD is opening in other computers also. But the icon on the task bar has a red circle with a slash telling me " DirectCD - No supported drive! ". How to remove the red circle? This is irritating to look at!

 

Let's back up a bit.

 

What are you trying to do? If it is make Data CDs, Nero and Roxio can both do it.

 

If it is making Packet-Written CDs with Nero's InCD or Roxio's DirectCD (or Drag2Disc in later Vesions), all Packet-Writing is proprietary. Roxio does include a .udf reader which will install itself on any computer that doesn't have a .udf reader, which might be the difference you are seeing.

 

However, for practical purposes, all Packet-Writing (where you format the disc) is REALLY good at is permantly losing the data. It will lose it faster if you format CD-RW discs in the mistaken belief you can selectively erase things and get the space back short of erasing the ENTIRE disc.

 

If the idea is to move things from computer to computer, I'd suggest a flash drive.

 

If the idea is to short-term store things, I'd suggest a flash drive (aka thumb, keychain, pen, or jump drive). (If used with WinXP, always eject before removing or it will EAT the removable media.)

 

If the idea is to long-term store things on CD, I'd suggest a Sessions-based program such as ECDC 5's DataProject, or the equivilant program in Nero, or WinXP's built-in burning program (which works like Drag&Drop but is actually Sessions).

 

Since that does not actually address your specific question, I'd suggest you contact the source you got your Version from. Altho it might indicate the computer reading the disc cannot write because the program isn't installed on it.)

 

However, meanwhile, you might find the information in FREQUENT ANSWERS (pinned to the top of the board) of interest.

 

Lynn

Edited by lynn98109

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<snip>

 

Since that does not actually address your specific question, I'd suggest you contact the source you got your Version from. Altho it might indicate the computer reading the disc cannot write because the program isn't installed on it.)

 

However, meanwhile, you might find the information in FREQUENT ANSWERS (pinned to the top of the board) of interest.

 

Lynn

Let me add another couple suggestions. Check in 'Add/Remove Programs', and see if you can simply uninstall Direct CD.

 

Alternatively, right-click on the offending icon and see if it has an option for "remove from system tray", or something to that effect.

 

Good luck!

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If the idea is to long-term store things on CD, I'd suggest a Sessions-based program such as ECDC 5's DataProject

Yes, thanks Lynn! My idea was to long-time store things on CD. As you have suggested I tried sessions-based programme and happy to say the whole thing was successful.

 

Let me add another couple suggestions. Check in 'Add/Remove Programs', and see if you can simply uninstall Direct CD.

Yes, thanks Deweywright! Your suggestion came handy. I went to "Add/Remove Programs" and uninstalled "Direct CD'. The irritating icon on the task bar has simply vanished! Well, now in absence of 'Direct CD', what other free programme could be used that will not conflict with Easy CD Creator 5 Basic?

 

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vimoksha

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vimoksha said:

 

"Well, now in absence of 'Direct CD', what other free programme could be used that will not conflict with Easy CD Creator 5 Basic? "

 

 

 

What is it that you want to do, that Easy CD Creator 5 Basic does not do?

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Yes, thanks Deweywright! Your suggestion came handy. I went to "Add/Remove Programs" and uninstalled "Direct CD'. The irritating icon on the task bar has simply vanished! Well, now in absence of 'Direct CD', what other free programme could be used that will not conflict with Easy CD Creator 5 Basic?

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vimoksha

Direct CD doesn't conflict with ECDC 5, since they're different parts of the same suite. They're simply two different ways of writing to disc. If ECDC 5 is working for you, allowing you to write discs, then as was asked by Brendon, what else do you want/need?

 

By uninstalling Direct CD, you didn't uninstall ECDC 5, so you should still be able to write CDs. Is there something we're missing?

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Dear Brendont and Deweywright,

 

Just because the Icon with red circle over it was irritating I have deleted 'Direct CD'. Now if I want to format any CD, the Easy CD Creator 5 basic cannot help me. It says 'install Direct CD'. If I install 'Direct CD', the icon on the task bar reminds me 'Direct CD no supported drive'. This is my problem.

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vimoksha

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Dear Brendon T and Deweywright,

 

Just because the Icon with red circle over it was irritating I have deleted 'Direct CD'. Now if I want to format any CD, the Easy CD Creator 5 basic cannot help me. It says 'install Direct CD'. If I install 'Direct CD', the icon on the task bar reminds me 'Direct CD no supported drive'. This is my problem.

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vimoksha

 

If you want to KEEP the data, NEVER format the discs.

 

(from FREQUENT ANSWERS, pinned to the top of the board) -

 

If you format the disc, it is formated with DirectCD, and will only work with DirectCD. It will call up DirectCD evry time you put it in. It's what I call "Basic False Analogy" - you format the floppy, then use the floppy - therefore you format the CD-R or CD-RW, then use the CD-R or CD-RW. For all the other programs within the suite (the ones which are better for keeping your data long-term), use a BLANK blank disc, directly out of the package or off the spindle.

 

Lynn

Edited by lynn98109

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This explanation satisfies me. So DirectCD is just NOT required for my purpose. ECDC Basic is working fine.

 

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vimoksha

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This explanation satisfies me. So DirectCD is just NOT required for my purpose. ECDC Basic is working fine.

 

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vimoksha

Correct. You don't need Direct CD.

 

Direct CD and ECDC use different methods to write CDs.

 

Direct CD does Packet Writing, which requires you to format the disc, and any machine you want to read that disc on must have the UDF reader installed.

 

ECDC writes sessions, which is how a commercially pressed disc is written. These discs will be readable on most any drive on most any system you can find.

 

Enjoy!

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Thanks a lot!

 

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vimoksha

 

You're welcome.

 

When I first got a CD burner (with ECDC 4), I, too, thought that you had to format the CD-RW first (and I thought CD-RW was like "floppy disc". My software guru told me it was too unstable, but I was sure she was wrong. So I lost the 80% of the data on the formatted CD-RW that wasn't also on the Hard Drive.

 

Having managesd to learn the hard way, I remember it well.

 

Lylnn

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Well, Lylnn, if that be the case, why do people at all 'format' a new CD and what utility it has? This question is just out of academic interest - hope you wouldn't mind!

 

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vimoksha

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Well, Lynn, if that be the case, why do people at all 'format' a new CD and what utility it has? This question is just out of academic interest - hope you wouldn't mind!

 

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vimoksha

I suspect the reason most people format CDs is the same reason you and I did - a mistaken assumption it is like floppy discs. However, floppys are magnetic media.

 

Optical media get the equivilent of 0's and 1's with pits and lands - for commercial CDs they are physically pressed into the media; with R media a dye is "cooked" by the laser to create the pits and lands; with RW media the laser melts and re-crystalizes an aluminum alloy to create the pits and lands - and the alloy promptly starts to de-crystalize, taking all the data with it.

 

My software guru explained a while ago that packet-writing was developed to backup large files for short periods of time, as, for example, when creating a webpage or developing softwre. Once the page is online, you don't need the data any more (and if you put it on a RW disc, you can erase the disc.

 

However, for average users, both Packet-Writing and RW media are mostly misunderstood. (RW media is good for testing purposes, tho, because you can erase and re-test; after something works, you burn it on R media and erase the RW disc again for reuse.)

 

Lynn

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