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Create a DVD with Compression - One Step?


hkaplan131

Question

Is it possible to create a DVD file and compress it to fit on a single layer disk in one step. I have been able to do this by first writing the video file to a disk image first and then burning the image to a DVD with the compression option set. If I try to burn by inserting a single layer disk right out of the shoot, it says the disk is too small and does not give any option to compress.

 

Some of the videos I want to archive are only slightly bigger than a single layer DVD and would prefer to use them over a dual layer disk. It would be nice to do this in one step.

 

Howard

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I presumed you were using a camcorder rather than an EyeTV. So the two steps you're referring to is one to create the disc image and a second one to further compress the video to fit a single-layer DVD.

 

It has to take two steps. That's because the Fit-to-DVD feature requires the video to be authored into a VIDEO_TS folder. That's done when the disc image is being created from your EyeTV files. Here are the other options:

1. Don't put so much video in Toast so it all will fit a single-layer disc to begin with.

2. If your EyeTV is encoding the MPEGs from an analog channel, use a lower bit rate setting so the files are smaller and more will fit a disc. (This doesn't work when capturing digital TV with an EyeTV because the EyeTV isn't doing any encoding).

3. Choose Always Re-encode in Toast's custom encoder settings window and set the bit rate low enough so the re-encoded video will fit the single-layer disc.

 

The problem with option 1 is it uses more discs than what you're doing now. The problem with option 2 is you'll likely get lesser picture quality than what you're doing now (if, in fact, it even is an option depending on what TV source you're receiving with the EyeTV). The problem with option 3 is you'll likely get lesser picture quality AND it will take more time than you're doing now.

 

You say that Toast is doing encoding with your EyeTV files. That shouldn't happen. Toast should only be multiplexing them. If it is encoding then go to the custom encoder settings window and choose Never Re-encode. That saves time and doesn't diminish the picture quality.

 

Thanks for the time you have taken to reply. I will check tonight to see if Toast is re-encoding. I do recall the inidication it was multiplexing and then it went on to do something else. I forget the message while it was creating the disk image file.

 

Howard

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Aside from using a DVD camcorder or a standalone DVD recorder this has to be done in at least two steps. One step captures the video and the other encodes, authors and burns the DVD.

 

I believe Sony came out with a DVD recorder that looks slightly bigger than a DVD burner and can connect directly to a camera for importing directly to a video DVD. There still is a second step of finalizing the disc so it will play in other DVD players but that only takes a couple minutes.

 

I thought the capture part was recording the video with EyeTV. That puts the data in a digital format. Then Toast encodes and burns the disk. I am having to encode and "burn" the file to a DVD image and then convert it to a smaller image when I mount the image and compress it to a smaller file that will fit on a single layer DVD when I burn the disk. Seems to me this could be done in one step - the encoding and compression.

 

Howard

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I thought the capture part was recording the video with EyeTV. That puts the data in a digital format. Then Toast encodes and burns the disk. I am having to encode and "burn" the file to a DVD image and then convert it to a smaller image when I mount the image and compress it to a smaller file that will fit on a single layer DVD when I burn the disk. Seems to me this could be done in one step - the encoding and compression.

 

Howard

I presumed you were using a camcorder rather than an EyeTV. So the two steps you're referring to is one to create the disc image and a second one to further compress the video to fit a single-layer DVD.

 

It has to take two steps. That's because the Fit-to-DVD feature requires the video to be authored into a VIDEO_TS folder. That's done when the disc image is being created from your EyeTV files. Here are the other options:

1. Don't put so much video in Toast so it all will fit a single-layer disc to begin with.

2. If your EyeTV is encoding the MPEGs from an analog channel, use a lower bit rate setting so the files are smaller and more will fit a disc. (This doesn't work when capturing digital TV with an EyeTV because the EyeTV isn't doing any encoding).

3. Choose Always Re-encode in Toast's custom encoder settings window and set the bit rate low enough so the re-encoded video will fit the single-layer disc.

 

The problem with option 1 is it uses more discs than what you're doing now. The problem with option 2 is you'll likely get lesser picture quality than what you're doing now (if, in fact, it even is an option depending on what TV source you're receiving with the EyeTV). The problem with option 3 is you'll likely get lesser picture quality AND it will take more time than you're doing now.

 

You say that Toast is doing encoding with your EyeTV files. That shouldn't happen. Toast should only be multiplexing them. If it is encoding then go to the custom encoder settings window and choose Never Re-encode. That saves time and doesn't diminish the picture quality.

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Aside from using a DVD camcorder or a standalone DVD recorder this has to be done in at least two steps. One step captures the video and the other encodes, authors and burns the DVD.

 

I believe Sony came out with a DVD recorder that looks slightly bigger than a DVD burner and can connect directly to a camera for importing directly to a video DVD. There still is a second step of finalizing the disc so it will play in other DVD players but that only takes a couple minutes.

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