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Unwanted Leading Silence On Mp3s


thomasdodd

Question

Hi

 

Is this due to the particular encoder Roxio uses or is it something to do with MP3s ?

 

I need absolutely no leading or trailing silence to make seamless loops.

 

But everytime I save as an MP3 this tiny bit of silence gets inserted by default.

 

Anyone know how to avoid this ?

 

Very grateful for any suggestions

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You could use sound editor to remove the leading silence part (expand the timeline for accuracy, set the line where you want, click split clip), then right click on the clip without the silence, export to a new mp3 file. That, as far as I've tried it, does not reintroduce a leading silence.

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Hi

 

Is this due to the particular encoder Roxio uses or is it something to do with MP3s ?

 

I need absolutely no leading or trailing silence to make seamless loops.

 

But everytime I save as an MP3 this tiny bit of silence gets inserted by default.

 

Anyone know how to avoid this ?

 

Very grateful for any suggestions

Are you making an Audio CD for your "seamless loops"? If so, then the problem is possibly in the way you're creating your audio files. What is the source of your audio, tracks from CDs? Downloaded files? Files captured from your sound card?

 

The key for "seamless" transitions on an Audio CD is to make sure that the music part is an exact multiple of 2352 bytes because each track must start on a new block. If the previous track ends just a couple bytes into its last block, the rest of the block is padded (filled) with zeroes, aka: silence. Each block is 1/75th second long, so you can get an audible "blip" of silence between tracks. The key is in the preparation of the audio files initially, to make sure they end on a block boundary. By the way, all of this is much easier to handle in an uncompressed .WAV file. Many audio editors have an option for prepping tracks for CD use.

 

So, we have to go back to the source of your files.

 

If you're not creating Audio CDs, then this shouldn't be a problem, but open the files in Sound Editor to see if there is extra silence at the end or beginning of the track, and cut it.

 

Hope that helps!

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