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Inaccurate "folder Is Read-only" Error Message, Etc.


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I have been using Easy CD&DVD Creator 6 for a few months now. It has given me almost nothing but trouble. I can't, for example, save a file to a CD-RW disk using Drag-to-Disk on my desktop computer (Windows Me, 512 RAM) and then have it be readable on my notebook (Windows XP Home SP2, 512 RAM), even though both computers are using the same version of Easy CD&DVD Creator. When I insert a CD-RW disk that contains a file saved by the desktop into the notebook's CD drive, the disk just spins and spins and spins until a dialog box comes on telling me there are problems with the disk, the only solution to which ends up being to destroy all the files on the disk. I have tried multiple brand-new disks from multiple companies; the result, eventually, is always the same.

 

So I have resigned myself to the impossibility of transferring files from one computer to the other, the primary reason for which I purchased Easy CD&DVD Creator 6 in the first place, and have only been using Drag-to-Disk as a backup for each computer individually, without ever trying to transfer files from one machine to the other. Now, even that basic backup function has ceased to function!

 

I had about 300 MB of stored files from my desktop computer on a CD-RW disk that I've been using for about ten days. Today, suddenly, when I tried to save a simple MS Word file to that disk, I got the message that I could not do so because the "folder is read-only." Neither the file I was trying to back up nor the folder in which it was located was read-only. There were no read-only files on the CD-RW disk, either. When I then went, using Windows Explorer, to look at the contents of the CD-RW, I found that it no longer was called DESKTOP8 but had acquired the name UDFREADER.

 

I cannot believe what a hassle I am having with this program. I used to use DirectCD and never once had a problem. I switched to Easy CD&DVD Creator 6, because it was supposed to be compatible with both the computer systems I have, but it obviously is not.

 

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

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If you want to KEEP the data, NEVER use Packet-Writing, and NEVER use RW media.

 

You have used both. So you get to learn the hard way (as I did, I didn't think my software guru was right).

 

You are looking for a "great-big floppy-disc".

 

Packet-Writing (such as Drag2Disc, DirectCD, Sonic's DLA, Nero's InCD, etc) has a tendancy to fail. At a minimum, it can be very fussy about being read on EXACTLY the same Operating System and Version of Packet-Writing program as were used to write it. This means it's a LOUSY way to transer between file systems.

 

Commercial CDs are created by physically pressing the pits and lands into the metal (notice: no 1's and 0's set magneticly).

CD-Rs are made by "cooking" a dye with the laser beam to set the pits and lands - not quite as stable as a commercial CD, but close.

CD-RWs are made by melting an aluminum alloy and letting it recyrstalilze to create the pits and lands - and it promptly starts to de-crystalize, resulting in losing all data permanantly. You can't find a worse system for long-term storage.

 

It sounds like you have a failed CD-RW, since it is no longer showing what was copied to it, but only the three little files that are burned permanatly to launch the program to read it.

It MAY be possible to recover some of it with a recovery program, such as cdroller (www.cdroller.com) or ISOBuster (www.isobuster.com). Both now have "trial" Versions that enable you to find out if anything is recoverable before you have to pay.

 

For the future, I'd suggest you burn anything you want to KEEP to CD-R.

If both computers have USB ports, I'd suggest you get a Flash drive (aka Keychain drive, Thumb drive, Jump drive, Pen drive), and use it like a floppy for transferring files (my WinXP ate one of my Zip drives and 3 discs before I caught on, so I'm not recommending it around WinXP).

 

Lynn

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Thanks for writing, Lynn. I just don't understand how anyone could consider saving individual files to CD-R disks to be an efficient way to backup files on the fly. I have tried using Creator Classic to save files to a CD-R and finalizing the session but not the disk. I understood that if I didn't finalize the disk, I would be able to add more files to it. That did not, however, turn out to be possible. When I put the unfinalized disk into the CD-RW drive, Creator Classic recognized it as "not a blank disk." In other words, I have two computers running Easy CD&DVD Creator 6 on which it is impossible to back anything up without using an entire 700 MB CD-R to save, for instance, a 49 KB MS Word file. This just doesn't make sense! Especially since I have been using CD-RW disks for short-term backup on my desktop computer for five-plus years with no problem until I started using Easy CD&DVD Creator's packet-writing software.

 

Joan

 

If you want to KEEP the data, NEVER use Packet-Writing, and NEVER use RW media.

 

You have used both. So you get to learn the hard way (as I did, I didn't think my software guru was right).

 

You are looking for a "great-big floppy-disc".

 

Packet-Writing (such as Drag2Disc, DirectCD, Sonic's DLA, Nero's InCD, etc) has a tendancy to fail. At a minimum, it can be very fussy about being read on EXACTLY the same Operating System and Version of Packet-Writing program as were used to write it. This means it's a LOUSY way to transer between file systems.

 

Commercial CDs are created by physically pressing the pits and lands into the metal (notice: no 1's and 0's set magneticly).

CD-Rs are made by "cooking" a dye with the laser beam to set the pits and lands - not quite as stable as a commercial CD, but close.

CD-RWs are made by melting an aluminum alloy and letting it recyrstalilze to create the pits and lands - and it promptly starts to de-crystalize, resulting in losing all data permanantly. You can't find a worse system for long-term storage.

 

It sounds like you have a failed CD-RW, since it is no longer showing what was copied to it, but only the three little files that are burned permanatly to launch the program to read it.

It MAY be possible to recover some of it with a recovery program, such as cdroller (www.cdroller.com) or ISOBuster (www.isobuster.com). Both now have "trial" Versions that enable you to find out if anything is recoverable before you have to pay.

 

For the future, I'd suggest you burn anything you want to KEEP to CD-R.

If both computers have USB ports, I'd suggest you get a Flash drive (aka Keychain drive, Thumb drive, Jump drive, Pen drive), and use it like a floppy for transferring files (my WinXP ate one of my Zip drives and 3 discs before I caught on, so I'm not recommending it around WinXP).

 

Lynn

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Joan: You are trying to utilize two separate methods of writing and each has its' own specific requirements to work.

 

Classic w/Sessions: Works fine but in V6 it does require correct timing. To reuse the disc, you must start Classic and then insert the disc. You should get a pop-up about importing the files. Do so.

 

The disc must be in the drive and recognized before you add anything to the Project window! If you don't do it this way, it won't work.

 

Packet Writing (D2D): Usually a good method for transfer of files between PCs. Not a reliable form of burning, so it should never be used for archiving!

 

Not all drives can read all RW media! That seems to be what you are encountering. You need to find the 'lowest common denominator' and stick with that. I suggest 640mb with speed of 1X-4X. Speed is critical with CD-RW media. 700mb would be the next choice but stay away from HS or Ultra-HS speed media.

 

Never use compression when formatting and use full format.

 

Set the Eject Options to UDF (Advanced Settings) and do not check the "Make disc readable on…"

 

Format one in each PC and see which one stays interchangeable after transferring files back and forth a couple of times.

 

I can only second what Lynn said about long term storage with RW media! Recent reports in the trade back this up and they report much worse experience than I have seen.

 

You may have 5 years on some and I have 7+ on some of mine. Yet I have them fail on the 3rd write, some go 100 but most fail by 50 uses.

 

A CD-R disc costs about 20 cents and is expected to last 100 years. The next time you pull out an RW disc, it may be blank.

Thanks for writing, Lynn. I just don't understand how anyone could consider saving individual files to CD-R disks to be an efficient way to backup files on the fly. I have tried using Creator Classic to save files to a CD-R and finalizing the session but not the disk. I understood that if I didn't finalize the disk, I would be able to add more files to it. That did not, however, turn out to be possible. When I put the unfinalized disk into the CD-RW drive, Creator Classic recognized it as "not a blank disk." In other words, I have two computers running Easy CD&DVD Creator 6 on which it is impossible to back anything up without using an entire 700 MB CD-R to save, for instance, a 49 KB MS Word file. This just doesn't make sense! Especially since I have been using CD-RW disks for short-term backup on my desktop computer for five-plus years with no problem until I started using Easy CD&DVD Creator's packet-writing software.

 

Joan

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Dear James,

 

Many thanks for taking the time to write this detailed message. Between you and Lynn, I now fully understand the limitations of CD-RW media, and I don't intend to use it for permanent file storage, as I had assumed I could in the past.

 

I have just tried to do what you suggest re inserting my CD-R disk on which I had finalized only one session--i.e., start Creator, don't put any files in the project window, and then insert the disk that already has one session of recording on it--and the message again is "Not a blank recordable disk."

 

As for D2D, all my settings are exactly as you advise. I have two CD-RW backup disks, one for the notebook and one for the desktop. If I save a file on the notebook CD-RW disk, I can retrieve it on the desktop PC (during the time before the UDFREADER deal rears its ugly head, anyway), but the minute I try to back up a desktop file onto that notebook-formatted disk, it becomes unreadable on the notebook. I.e., when I put the disk in the notebook drive, it just spins and spins and spins until the dialog box comes on saying that there are problems with the disk. Whereupon the only option is to let the notebook scan the disk, find errors, and then reformat the disk, thereby erasing its files.

 

At this point, I would be happy just to be able to have separate backup CD-RWs for each computer and never have the twain interact, but, as I wrote yesterday, even that basic function goes kerflouey when the UDFREADER monster appears on the scene!

 

Thanks again!

 

Joan

 

Joan: You are trying to utilize two separate methods of writing and each has its' own specific requirements to work.

 

Classic w/Sessions: Works fine but in V6 it does require correct timing. To reuse the disc, you must start Classic and then insert the disc. You should get a pop-up about importing the files. Do so.

 

The disc must be in the drive and recognized before you add anything to the Project window! If you don't do it this way, it won't work.

 

Packet Writing (D2D): Usually a good method for transfer of files between PCs. Not a reliable form of burning, so it should never be used for archiving!

 

Not all drives can read all RW media! That seems to be what you are encountering. You need to find the 'lowest common denominator' and stick with that. I suggest 640mb with speed of 1X-4X. Speed is critical with CD-RW media. 700mb would be the next choice but stay away from HS or Ultra-HS speed media.

 

Never use compression when formatting and use full format.

 

Set the Eject Options to UDF (Advanced Settings) and do not check the "Make disc readable on…"

 

Format one in each PC and see which one stays interchangeable after transferring files back and forth a couple of times.

 

I can only second what Lynn said about long term storage with RW media! Recent reports in the trade back this up and they report much worse experience than I have seen.

 

You may have 5 years on some and I have 7+ on some of mine. Yet I have them fail on the 3rd write, some go 100 but most fail by 50 uses.

 

A CD-R disc costs about 20 cents and is expected to last 100 years. The next time you pull out an RW disc, it may be blank.

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Dear James,

 

At this point, I would be happy just to be able to have separate backup CD-RWs for each computer and never have the twain interact, but, as I wrote yesterday, even that basic function goes kerflouey when the UDFREADER monster appears on the scene!

 

Thanks again!

 

Joan

 

Your mistake is to use Packet-Writing with CD-RW. If you MUST use Packet-Writing (NOT RECOMMENDED), at least format a CD-R. Then if it fails, you have a pretty good chance of being able to retrieve the information with a recovery program.

 

I think you are suffering from Basic False Anology - you format the floppy, then use the floppy; therefore you format the CD, then use the CD. If you format the CD, it is formatted by Drag2Disc, and will call up Drag2Disc every time it is inserted. All of the RELIABLE programs in the suite use a BLANK blank, directly out of the package or off the spindle.

 

If you are testing something, or only plan to keep it a few hours (transfer to another computer, for example), then CD-RW can be erased. That means the ENTIRE disc is erased and you start over. (You can "erase" on CD-R, which merely removes whatever from the TOC (Table of Contents), you don't get the space back.)

 

Try setting up a CD-R for each machine, using Classic Creator (I think it's "finalize session, don't finalize disc" but I'm only sure that's the way it is in V.5, whereas V.7 will do that automaticly). The discs I've done on my WinXP with RecordNow have the sessions finalized, and show up fine in my Win98 SE CD-RW drive - but because the disc isn't finalized, the CD-ROM says "no disc in drive". (This may be part of your problem, too.)

 

Uh, if you have 42KB files ... does your client have a floppy drive?

 

Lynn

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I appreciate your help! But I'm not sure I'm understanding you correctly, and I'm definitely not an expert in this technology or terminology. Can I just tell you what I've done?

 

To save files permanently on CD-R disks, I insert a blank disk right off the spindle into the CD/DVD drive with Creator running. I then move the files I want to archive into the project area, click Burn, choose "Finalize session. Do not finalize disk."

 

That's fine for files I want to archive permanently, but it's not good for files I just want to back up, as to a floppy disk, temporarily for transfer to my other computer. And, alas, on my notebook, there is no floppy disk. Are you telling me in your first paragraph that it is possible to use a CD-R disk this way if I just format one as I would a CD-RW disk? I.e., could I save two files to that D2D-formatted CD-R on Sunday and then add more files to it the next day and the day after that? I totally understand that CD-RW media aren't reliable for long-term storage, but I need a means of backing up the files on my hard drive for the short term. I have no desire to ERASE my CD-RW disks. I've only had to do so recently, since I began using the Roxio program on two different computers, and keep having UDFREADER be the only thing that winds up on my disks.

 

Thanks!

 

Joan

 

Your mistake is to use Packet-Writing with CD-RW. If you MUST use Packet-Writing (NOT RECOMMENDED), at least format a CD-R. Then if it fails, you have a pretty good chance of being able to retrieve the information with a recovery program.

 

I think you are suffering from Basic False Anology - you format the floppy, then use the floppy; therefore you format the CD, then use the CD. If you format the CD, it is formatted by Drag2Disc, and will call up Drag2Disc every time it is inserted. All of the RELIABLE programs in the suite use a BLANK blank, directly out of the package or off the spindle.

 

If you are testing something, or only plan to keep it a few hours (transfer to another computer, for example), then CD-RW can be erased. That means the ENTIRE disc is erased and you start over. (You can "erase" on CD-R, which merely removes whatever from the TOC (Table of Contents), you don't get the space back.)

 

Try setting up a CD-R for each machine, using Classic Creator (I think it's "finalize session, don't finalize disc" but I'm only sure that's the way it is in V.5, whereas V.7 will do that automaticly). The discs I've done on my WinXP with RecordNow have the sessions finalized, and show up fine in my Win98 SE CD-RW drive - but because the disc isn't finalized, the CD-ROM says "no disc in drive". (This may be part of your problem, too.)

 

Uh, if you have 42KB files ... does your client have a floppy drive?

 

Lynn

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That's fine for files I want to archive permanently, but it's not good for files I just want to back up, as to a floppy disk, temporarily for transfer to my other computer. And, alas, on my notebook, there is no floppy disk. Are you telling me in your first paragraph that it is possible to use a CD-R disk this way if I just format one as I would a CD-RW disk? I.e., could I save two files to that D2D-formatted CD-R on Sunday and then add more files to it the next day and the day after that? I totally understand that CD-RW media aren't reliable for long-term storage, but I need a means of backing up the files on my hard drive for the short term. I have no desire to ERASE my CD-RW disks. I've only had to do so recently, since I began using the Roxio program on two different computers, and keep having UDFREADER be the only thing that winds up on my disks.

 

Thanks!

 

Joan

 

Yes.

 

The "RW" refers to the construction of the disc, which makes it possible to entirely erase it and re-write it.

 

It has nothing to do with "being like a floppy".

 

So I lost the 80% of the files on the Packet-Written CD-RW that weren't also on the Hard Drive.

 

Lynn

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Joan: As far as D2D and media, you can use either CD-R or CD-RW. The only difference is that with CD-R you cannot recover space and it will fill up in time. Even if you overwrite or erase a file, the original file is still there taking up space.

 

There is still some incompatibility between your two PCs and I suspect it is in the burner hardware. Since your Desktop PC is running ME, I assume it is several years old. It could be that the burner is not capable of utilizing Quick Format. Although the same could be true for the newer laptop???

 

My guess is that if you format (use RW for experimenting) the disc on the old PC using Full Format it will be usable in both PCs.

 

One other thought, brand of media. If you are using Memorex CD-RWs you have about the worst media money can buy.

 

If you use Classic with Sessions, you could still be crippled by the burner. Not all older burners can write Sessions.

 

If transferring files between these two is an ongoing process, you should consider a network. With XP, it is a no brainer, just plug in the wire. With ME it is a little more work.

 

There are "starter kits" for both hard wire and wireless. Your Laptop probably has a NIC card built in.

 

Once you establish a home network you will wonder why you didn't do it sooner!

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Well, that's wonderful news! I don't care about being able to erase anything. I just care about being able to save files in a way that is convenient and allows them to be transferred to my other computer. I will try this later on today, Sunday, as I have guests coming shortly for brunch. Thanks!

 

BTW, I *was* finally able yesterday to retrieve the lost data from the UDFREADER CD-RW disk. The process took a VERY long time, however.

 

Joan

 

Yes.

 

The "RW" refers to the construction of the disc, which makes it possible to entirely erase it and re-write it.

 

It has nothing to do with "being like a floppy".

 

So I lost the 80% of the files on the Packet-Written CD-RW that weren't also on the Hard Drive.

 

Lynn

 

 

Thanks, James. I will try full-formatting a disk on the desktop (which, as you suspected, is over five years old, though I did get a new CD-RW drive for it last winter) and see if I can successfully use that disk on the notebook. (In my past attempts, I think I've always formatted the disk I wanted to share on the notebook.) I have never used Quick Format on either machine.

 

Right now I'm using HP disks. The ones I used before were made by Imation. I've never used Memorex.

 

As for setting up a home network, that's a great idea; but for several months a year I use my notebook, a business machine, at a location two hours away.

 

Will try your ideas and Lynn's and report back!

 

Joan

 

Joan: As far as D2D and media, you can use either CD-R or CD-RW. The only difference is that with CD-R you cannot recover space and it will fill up in time. Even if you overwrite or erase a file, the original file is still there taking up space.

 

There is still some incompatibility between your two PCs and I suspect it is in the burner hardware. Since your Desktop PC is running ME, I assume it is several years old. It could be that the burner is not capable of utilizing Quick Format. Although the same could be true for the newer laptop???

 

My guess is that if you format (use RW for experimenting) the disc on the old PC using Full Format it will be usable in both PCs.

 

One other thought, brand of media. If you are using Memorex CD-RWs you have about the worst media money can buy.

 

If you use Classic with Sessions, you could still be crippled by the burner. Not all older burners can write Sessions.

 

If transferring files between these two is an ongoing process, you should consider a network. With XP, it is a no brainer, just plug in the wire. With ME it is a little more work.

 

There are "starter kits" for both hard wire and wireless. Your Laptop probably has a NIC card built in.

 

Once you establish a home network you will wonder why you didn't do it sooner!

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"There is still some incompatibility between your two PCs and I suspect it is in the burner hardware. Since your Desktop PC is running ME, I assume it is several years old. It could be that the burner is not capable of utilizing Quick Format. Although the same could be true for the newer laptop???"

 

Today, I was able to D2D format a CD-R disk on my desktop and copy several files to it. Then I put the disk in the CD/DVD drive of the notebook, and, lo and behold, I was able to retrieve files from that CD-R *and* even save a file from the notebook onto the CD-R D2D-formatted disk.

 

When I put that disk BACK in the desktop, I was able to open the file that I had saved to the disk on the notebook, but when I tried to EJECT the disk from the desktop, I got a message that the recorder was busy.

 

It has now been at least three hours since I first started trying to eject that disk from the desktop, and I'm still getting the message that the recorder is busy.

 

When I originally formatted this disk using D2D, I used Quick Format--because that was the only option I was given. Then, admittedly, I chose to make the disk readable on any computer, worrying that a situation might crop up in which I would want to read the disk on a machine that didn't use D2D.

 

I will try restarting the computer to see if I can get the disk to eject that way, but something doesn't seem to be right.

 

Best,

Joan

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In the midst of my above-described attempts to cobble together a workable system of file exchange between my notebook and my desktop, the hard drive on my notebook "failed." I have only had this notebook for nine months, and this is the SECOND TIME the hard drive has gone kerflouey. Fortunately, I had been backing up files like crazy on CD-R disks, using Creator Classic, so it wasn't the disaster that it might have been, but it definitely threw a wrench into the monkey works.

 

I was eventually able to remove the CD-R disk described in my last message from the desktop after restarting that machine. Since installing the new hard drive sent to me by HP, I have been using separate D2D-formatted CD-R disks to save files on each computer for transfer to the other. Because of the way that the CD-R disk to which I tried to save files from both computers got stuck in the desktop, I have decided that my best bet is to use those disks only to save files from one of the two machines. The desktop seems to reliably be able to retrieve files from the notebook disk and vice versa. I just can't try to mix files from both computers together on the same disk.

 

I will try, as James suggested, to find some slower-speed CD-RW disks, just to see if that might make a difference. My WinMe desktop and my WinXP notebook, BTW, can "Quick Format" CD-R disks.

 

In any case, thanks to everyone's patient and detailed advice, I have at least found a solution I can live with. Much appreciated!

 

Joan

 

"There is still some incompatibility between your two PCs and I suspect it is in the burner hardware. Since your Desktop PC is running ME, I assume it is several years old. It could be that the burner is not capable of utilizing Quick Format. Although the same could be true for the newer laptop???"

 

Today, I was able to D2D format a CD-R disk on my desktop and copy several files to it. Then I put the disk in the CD/DVD drive of the notebook, and, lo and behold, I was able to retrieve files from that CD-R *and* even save a file from the notebook onto the CD-R D2D-formatted disk.

 

When I put that disk BACK in the desktop, I was able to open the file that I had saved to the disk on the notebook, but when I tried to EJECT the disk from the desktop, I got a message that the recorder was busy.

 

It has now been at least three hours since I first started trying to eject that disk from the desktop, and I'm still getting the message that the recorder is busy.

 

When I originally formatted this disk using D2D, I used Quick Format--because that was the only option I was given. Then, admittedly, I chose to make the disk readable on any computer, worrying that a situation might crop up in which I would want to read the disk on a machine that didn't use D2D.

 

I will try restarting the computer to see if I can get the disk to eject that way, but something doesn't seem to be right.

 

Best,

Joan

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