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Ty Catt

Keyframes in Audio Waveform

Question

How do you delete a "green dot" keyframe on the yellow waveform readout in Videowave.

 

I see the cursor changing, but I don't think I've seen it all yet.

 

While I'm at it, is there a decent explanation on how to work them (I know what they are used for).

 

Thanks!

 

Tlyler

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How do you delete a "green dot" keyframe on the yellow waveform readout in Videowave.

 

I see the cursor changing, but I don't think I've seen it all yet.

 

While I'm at it, is there a decent explanation on how to work them (I know what they are used for).

 

Thanks!

 

Tlyler

Click on it and move it. Actually I'm not sure what you mean,

 

Could you just use plain english rather than tech jargon. To me a keyframe is a video term pointing to a specific frame in a video.

 

Is this what you mean? You cannot adjust that initial fade in.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perhaps watching the video on adding a music cut will help.

Edited by sknis

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Click on it and move it. Actually I'm not sure what you mean,

 

Could you just use plain english rather than tech jargon. To me a keyframe is a video term pointing to a specific frame in a video.

 

Is this what you mean? You cannot adjust that initial fade in.

 

Perhaps watching the video on adding a music cut will help.

 

Sorry- A keyframe is one of several desgination points a user creates to alter parameters of a clip over a set period of time. No way of not sounding techy I suppose.

 

The user inputs info which tells the video or audio to change it's settings over a designated period of time.

 

A complete set of keyframed points is known as an envelope.

 

In the case of audio, you can program your track to be at a certain volume once it starts, decend to a new level at another time, and then rise back up at another- esp, useful for voiceovers.

 

Some softwares allow keyframes on almost any feature of a clip, like color, speed, and position. Animation softwares are especially dependent upon keyframes and envelopes.

 

Yes I know you can't adjust the intial key in EMC, but like I mentioned, I accidentally added some on the audio clip and now I can't get rid of them.

 

It looks like EMC intended us to be able to create envelopes. I'd love to be able to use them if I knew how work them.

 

I'll check out your video clp.

 

Thanks,

 

Ty

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Sorry- A keyframe is one of several desgination points a user creates to alter parameters of a clip over a set period of time. No way of not sounding techy I suppose.

 

The user inputs info which tells the video or audio to change it's settings over a designated period of time.

 

A complete set of keyframed points is known as an envelope.

 

In the case of audio, you can program your track to be at a certain volume once it starts, decend to a new level at another time, and then rise back up at another- esp, useful for voiceovers.

 

Some softwares allow keyframes on almost any feature of a clip, like color, speed, and position. Animation softwares are especially dependent upon keyframes and envelopes.

 

Yes I know you can't adjust the intial key in EMC, but like I mentioned, I accidentally added some on the audio clip and now I can't get rid of them.

 

It looks like EMC intended us to be able to create envelopes. I'd love to be able to use them if I knew how work them.

 

I'll check out your video clp.

 

Thanks,

 

Ty

 

You should be able to right click on them and delete them. You must have selected the point and right clicked. The options window that opens has the option to "Delete Pont" ;)

 

You also referred to a video key frame - animation. I had never seen anyone use that term used for audio since technically it is not a key frame on which video and audio are tied. :unsure:

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Sorry- A keyframe is one of several desgination points a user creates to alter parameters of a clip over a set period of time. No way of not sounding techy I suppose.

 

The user inputs info which tells the video or audio to change it's settings over a designated period of time.

 

A complete set of keyframed points is known as an envelope.

 

In the case of audio, you can program your track to be at a certain volume once it starts, decend to a new level at another time, and then rise back up at another- esp, useful for voiceovers.

 

Some softwares allow keyframes on almost any feature of a clip, like color, speed, and position. Animation softwares are especially dependent upon keyframes and envelopes.

 

Yes I know you can't adjust the intial key in EMC, but like I mentioned, I accidentally added some on the audio clip and now I can't get rid of them.

 

It looks like EMC intended us to be able to create envelopes. I'd love to be able to use them if I knew how work them.

 

I'll check out your video clp.

 

Thanks,

 

Ty

 

Definition of Keyframes also known as I-Frames

 

Short for intraframe, a video compression method used by the MPEG standard. In a motion sequence, individual frames of pictures are grouped together (called a group of pictures, or GOP) and played back so that the viewer registers the video’s spatial motion. Also called a keyframe, an I-frame is a single frame of digital content that the compressor examines independent of the frames that precede and follow it and stores all of the data needed to display that frame. Typically, a I-frames are interspersed with P-frames and B-frames in a compressed video. The more I-frames that are contained, the better quality the video will be; however, I-frames contain the most amount of bits and therefore take up more space on the storage medium.

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Definition of Keyframes also known as I-Frames

 

Short for intraframe, a video compression method used by the MPEG standard. In a motion sequence, individual frames of pictures are grouped together (called a group of pictures, or GOP) and played back so that the viewer registers the video’s spatial motion. Also called a keyframe, an I-frame is a single frame of digital content that the compressor examines independent of the frames that precede and follow it and stores all of the data needed to display that frame. Typically, a I-frames are interspersed with P-frames and B-frames in a compressed video. The more I-frames that are contained, the better quality the video will be; however, I-frames contain the most amount of bits and therefore take up more space on the storage medium.

 

 

Actually, I-Frames and Key Frames are completely unrelated.

 

I-Frames are used in the DVD burn process, not for the editing process of controlling clip attributes over time.

 

If you look closely in other EMC programs, like the Sound Editor, you will see the term envelope (via Key Frames) used in the capacity in which I have been referring. That's why I think VideoWave has the same capabilties.

 

Tyler

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Actually, I-Frames and Key Frames are completely unrelated.

 

I-Frames are used in the DVD burn process, not for the editing process of controlling clip attributes over time.

 

If you look closely in other EMC programs, like the Sound Editor, you will see the term envelope (via Key Frames) used in the capacity in which I have been referring. That's why I think VideoWave has the same capabilties.

 

Tyler

 

Putting all that aside, were you able to remove or edit the "audio" change points as I suggested above and in that video? - Now that I understand what you wanted to do. ;)

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Putting all that aside, were you able to remove or edit the "audio" change points as I suggested above and in that video? - Now that I understand what you wanted to do. ;)

 

Sknis,

 

Yes, Thank You!

 

It turns out, I wasn't highlighting the point first- it was always ghosted.

 

Right clicking and deleting worked once I selected the point.

 

Much better now, thanks again for your assistance.

 

Ty

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