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REDWAGON

CAV and CLT burning

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Brendon you are one smart turkey ! I took a short evening class at our local Jr. College some time ago just to get a little more acquainted with how all this burning took place and what I learned was pretty much what you just suggested. Back then, they were just coming out with the new burners that could keep the buffer from running completely dry and stoppiong the burn.

 

Also, one thing I might add is how the burner is designed. As I remember the operative word was "CAV" or something like that as opposed to another way (was it linear or something like that) ? that the burner does it's job. The differences can change the burn rate depending on what type of burn you are making as I recall. That's been a while back, so I could be way off base about that. Anyway, good reply post Brendon.

 

Frank........

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Also, one thing I might add is how the burner is designed. As I remember the operative word was "CAV" or something like that as opposed to another way (was it linear or something like that) ? that the burner does it's job. The differences can change the burn rate depending on what type of burn you are making as I recall. That's been a while back, so I could be way off base about that.

No, CAV/CLV isn't relevant here, so I'll take that to PM rather than distract the thread.

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Gosh, I just had to go back and dig out some of my notes from long ago to remind myself of what I thought I had learned then.

"CAV" was the acronym for Constant Angular Velocity. It's advantage was that the drives motor ran at a constant speed.

"CLV" was the other acronym I was tring to think of that means Constant Linear Velocity. CLV drives, especially with real high speed CD-ROM's, have a small "Latency" when the drive changes it's rotational speed.

 

I'm O.K. now guys. LOL !!

 

Frank.....

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Gosh, I just had to go back and dig out some of my notes from long ago to remind myself of what I thought I had learned then.

"CAV" was the acronym for Constant Angular Velocity. It's advantage was that the drives motor ran at a constant speed.

"CLV" was the other acronym I was tring to think of that means Constant Linear Velocity. CLV drives, especially with real high speed CD-ROM's, have a small "Latency" when the drive changes it's rotational speed.

 

I'm O.K. now guys. LOL !!

 

Frank.....

Well, as long as we're off topic... originally, all CD drives were CLV, and constantly adjust the motors speed to keep the linear velocity of the data the same from the inside of the disc (the beginning) to the outside edge. That way, the laser/read electronics didn't have to worry about how fast the data was coming in, as it was always coming in at the same speed. It was also a way to fit more information onto the disc, keeping all the pits and lands the same size, as opposed to how an LP works.

 

An LP is a Constant Angular Velocity device, so at the outside of the disc where the linear velocity is the highest, the music in the grooves is much more "stretched out" and takes up much more space than it does at the center of the disc.

 

As CD Drives got faster, there was, of course, and upper limit to how fast you could spin them without risk of them flying apart, or simply too much off-balance vibration. Since the data is always written in a CLV mode the data at the center can't be read as fast as at the outer edge, so folks complaining about not being able to burn a copy of a CD at 52X all the way had to have it explained that even with the drive running "flat out", the inner edge is only running around 16X, and it doesn't hit 52X until near the outer edge.

 

Thus endeth the lesson. :)

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