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Netflix Adds Hd Dvd Rental Option

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Netflix adds HD DVD rental option

There’s no indication, however, when titles will be available

 

MARCH 13 | Netflix has begun allowing users to set up their rental queue to add HD DVD discs, however, no movies appear to be available yet on the site in the format.

 

 

The additional Netflix feature comes as a delay is increasingly likely for the HD DVD format launch, which is set for later this month. Last week, Walmart.com stopped taking pre-orders for HD DVDs, sending an e-mail to those who had already ordered that said the titles were canceled (VB, 3-10).

 

Netflix is allowing users to alter their account set-up so that they can receive HD DVD rentals, however, the company doesn’t say when those high-definition films will become available. Users must click that they have the necessary equipment to play HD DVDs before choosing whether to set the HD DVD format as their first choice format for discs they rent.

 

 

Netflix is not charging subscribers more to rent HD DVDs.

 

The company describes HD DVD as a new type of high-definition format that will “greatly improve home entertainment,” while noting that users should check back later in the year for Blu-ray availability.

 

Soon after the launch people will begin to complain that the movies wont play, or they wont play in full resolution over thier sets and the vendors know it is coming. So it's pretty clever of Netflix to make the customer declare they are "HD ready".

 

Does anyone remember back in the days of the VHS-Betamax wars that you could rent a player as well as a tape when you were at the rental store? Could this be coming for the brick and mortar stores for Blu-ray and HD-DVD players? It would sure give them an edge over mail order!

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Does anyone remember back in the days of the VHS-Betamax wars that you could rent a player as well as a tape when you were at the rental store? Could this be coming for the brick and mortar stores for Blu-ray and HD-DVD players? It would sure give them an edge over mail order!

 

The equipment rentals ended due to theft, according to my neighborhood Video/DVD rental store.

 

Lynn

Edited by lynn98109

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Now the big question is - which format are the HD DVDs using? Windows HD WMV or HD DivX?

 

 

There is no question which format. There's no prefix "Windows WMV HD DivX HD" but you knew that?

 

cdanteek

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yes there is STILL a question. If you know the answer, why not tell us. MPEG2 HD simply would not fit an entire movie even on a dual layer disc unless it was extremely compressed. I've already seen video editors that support both HD WMV and HD DivX with several players already supporting both.

 

So the question remains -- Since they made it clear the discs are not Blueray, which HD format will Netflix be renting?

Edited by ggrussell

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yes there is STILL a question. If you know the answer, why not tell us. MPEG2 HD simply would not fit an entire movie even on a dual layer disc unless it was extremely compressed. I've already seen video editors that support both HD WMV and HD DivX with several players already supporting both.

 

So the question remains -- Since they made it clear the discs are not Blueray, which HD format will Netflix be renting?

 

I may be displaying my ignorance, but mightn't this be like DVD dash and DVD plus - that once the disc has been burned, players generally aren't too picky which it was? (I think a burned DVD I have that doesn't play on some DVD players has to do with the fact it is from PAL instead of the North-American format.)

 

If so, then the distinction would be relevant when we get to burners, not players. Or am I totally out of it (not unusual with DVDs)?

 

Lynn

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I may be displaying my ignorance, but mightn't this be like DVD dash and DVD plus - that once the disc has been burned, players generally aren't too picky which it was? (I think a burned DVD I have that doesn't play on some DVD players has to do with the fact it is from PAL instead of the North-American format.)

 

If so, then the distinction would be relevant when we get to burners, not players. Or am I totally out of it (not unusual with DVDs)?

 

Lynn

 

Very few (if any) North American players are able to play PAL so that DVD is propably NTSC

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yes there is STILL a question. If you know the answer, why not tell us. MPEG2 HD simply would not fit an entire movie even on a dual layer disc unless it was extremely compressed. I've already seen video editors that support both HD WMV and HD DivX with several players already supporting both.

 

So the question remains -- Since they made it clear the discs are not Blueray, which HD format will Netflix be renting?

 

 

I only know what I read and understand.

The HD Promotional Group states HD DVD and DVD specification Compression

technology MPEG-4 AVC/VC-1/MPEG-2

In addition to DVD's MPEG-2, HD DVD players also recognize both MPEG-4 AVC and VC-1 based on Microsoft's Windows Media. The excellent efficiency of MPEG-4 AVC and VC-1 allow image data to be compressed to about one-third the size achieved by MPEG-2 and replay of high quality digital images.

 

The Toshiba HDA1 - HD DVD Player states the same spec.

 

If you mean the VC-1 based on, is WMV HD I see.

 

MPEG-4 AVC/VC-1/MPEG-2 allows 15GB, HD resolution over 4 hours, 30GB, HD resolution over 8 hours,

User bit rate 36.55Mbps, with this disclaimer Playback or recording time depends on data transfer speed.

 

Now HD starts at about 25.00Mbps bit rate. A dual layer 30gig HD DVD sould have no problem holding a movie and sound track. Since 2005 they have had 45gig triple layer HD DVD disc's. They have hybrid dvd's 15,30,and 45gig one side and what we know as dual layer on the flip side.

My Pearl Harbour DVD is two dual layer disc's. So if its big enough not to fit on a 30 or 45 gig disc and they put it on two disc's like in the past. It still is HD DVD in MPEG-4 AVC/VC-1/MPEG-2.

 

I see HD DVD, WMV HD, and HD divX as three format's. If I'm misunderstanding this please explain it to me.

 

 

 

cdanteek

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I may be displaying my ignorance, but mightn't this be like DVD dash and DVD plus - that once the disc has been burned, players generally aren't too picky which it was?

 

(I think a burned DVD I have that doesn't play on some DVD players has to do with the fact it is from PAL instead of the North-American format.)

Lynn

 

Physically there is a difference between a DVD-R disc and a DVD+R disc that is made during the production process.

This booktype field identifies the disc as either a DVD-ROM, DVD+R(W) or a DVD-R(W) disc and is for a big part responsible for the compatibility. Because this setting is overwritten during the DVD-R production process it can’t be modified afterwards, the laser of your DVD recorder simply can’t write to that part of the disc. During the production of DVD+R and DL+R discs the space is untouched. Your recorder will be able to modify this field( Bit Setting) to DVD-ROM and fool the DVD player.

 

Pal to NTSC is one thing and Region code is another. There are many PAL to NTSC dvd players avaliable in the US, that play fine on US tv's. Toshiba, JVC, Phillips, Pioneer, and CyberHome to name a few. The CyberHome is $39.00 at Best Buy. The reason they work is they have a Pal to NTSC converter in them.

 

Now region code is on a pressed bought DVD disc. Put there by the MPAA (Motion Picture Association of America) for what ever there reasons! Burned dvds are region free.

So a region 1 us disc won't play in a region 2 uk player and the same in reverse. Just like our DVD burners and DVD roms in our computers. The first time we insert a DVD disc we have to set region code and have four changes left.

 

Always exception to the rule. Region free hacks for settop players, DVD burners, and DVD rom's are there to find. Most of the settops seem to have a secret code to punch in and make them region free. The manfacture can't advertise it but the seem to be out there somewhere.

 

The Pal to NTSC is always confused with region code. I hope this explains it.

 

cdanteek

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Very few (if any) North American players are able to play PAL so that DVD is propably NTSC

 

This one was DEFINATELY made from PAL because it was copied in Germany. And of two friends who have DVD players, one can play it and one can't. (It works fine in my CD-RW/CD-ROM drive.)

 

Lynn

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This one was DEFINATELY made from PAL because it was copied in Germany. And of two friends who have DVD players, one can play it and one can't. (It works fine in my CD-RW/CD-ROM drive.)

 

Lynn

 

 

This should work in most software dvd players. Mine Cyberlink power dvd xp. Put the dvd in the drive open the player and start the dvd, pause or stop the dvd and under configuration, information tab. You get all kinds of info on the dvd video you just played, a example.

Video Attribute :

Video compression mode : MPEG-2

TV system : 525/60 (NTSC)

Aspect Ratio : 16:9

Display Mode : Only Letterbox

Source picture resolution : 720x480 (525/60)

Frame Rate : 29.97

Source picture letterboxed : Not letterboxed

Bitrate : 4.80Mbps

 

Note ( ntsc) !

 

 

cdanteek

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I see HD DVD, WMV HD, and HD divX as three format's. If I'm misunderstanding this please explain it to me.

 

You understand it correctly.

 

In addition to DVD's MPEG-2, HD DVD players also recognize both MPEG-4 AVC and VC-1 based on Microsoft's Windows Media.

Sorry, that's what I meant by WMV. Not so much the Windows Media file format. Microsoft does NOT own the patent to MPEG4 and I find it odd that 'the industry' would decide to use something other than the patented version.

 

At the bitrates you quoted, there is no way a 2 hr HD movie would fit on 4.7 disc and if they squeezed one onto 8.5 gig, I would still question the quality. I don't think that anyone could convince me that a full frame, 1920X1080 @15Mbps HD 2hr video can fit on anything other than a blueray disc AND the quality still be acceptable.

 

Using the standard video tricks, I'm sure they could like reducing the resolution to EDTV and lowering the bitrate.

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I don't think that anyone could convince me that a full frame, 1920X1080 @15Mbps HD 2hr video can fit on anything other than a blueray disc AND the quality still be acceptable.

 

Since a Blu-Ray single-layer disc holds 25GB, and a HD DVD one holds 20GB, do you think that the 5GB difference is going to be critical?

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Since a Blu-Ray single-layer disc holds 25GB, and a HD DVD one holds 20GB, do you think that the 5GB difference is going to be critical?

Considering the HD I had on my Beloved Win98 SE computer until the end of last year was 4GB (newish one is 16GB, I was running out of room), I think 5GB is a LOT of space.

 

Lynn

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