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Compatability Between Different Versions Of Cd Creator


annrl2003

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Both my versions of Roxio came preinstalled in my Dell computer. I have at home version 5.3.5.17 which I upgraded from my Easy CD Creator 5.3.4. My new computer at work doesn't actually tell me the version I have installed of Roxio, but I was told it's the Roxio LE version or I was told The Roxio Creator is a rebranded version of Sonic DLM 7.0.

 

I format my brand new CDRW at home and give it a name and copy a file to it. I then put it in my new Dell computer at my business and instead of reading my CDRW already formatted, it brings up the CD Writing Wizard and it says that it can't complete the CD Writing Wizard and what do I want it to do. It basically then wants me to erase the CD and then rewrites the files to it.

 

On my old business computer the writing wizard never came up. All I would do is copy my files at home to my CDRW and then whey I got to my business computer, I would just paste it from my CDRW to my harddrive and visa versa too. I was able to us my CDRW like a floppy, just copying back and forth.

 

Why does my new computer bring up the writing wizard and not recognize that the CD already was formatted?

 

Thanks,

Ann

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Both my versions of Roxio came preinstalled in my Dell computer. I have at home version 5.3.5.17 which I upgraded from my Easy CD Creator 5.3.4. My new computer at work doesn't actually tell me the version I have installed of Roxio, but I was told it's the Roxio LE version or I was told The Roxio Creator is a rebranded version of Sonic DLM 7.0.

 

I format my brand new CDRW at home and give it a name and copy a file to it. I then put it in my new Dell computer at my business and instead of reading my CDRW already formatted, it brings up the CD Writing Wizard and it says that it can't complete the CD Writing Wizard and what do I want it to do. It basically then wants me to erase the CD and then rewrites the files to it.

 

On my old business computer the writing wizard never came up. All I would do is copy my files at home to my CDRW and then whey I got to my business computer, I would just paste it from my CDRW to my harddrive and visa versa too. I was able to us my CDRW like a floppy, just copying back and forth.

 

Why does my new computer bring up the writing wizard and not recognize that the CD already was formatted?

 

Thanks,

Ann

Well, the programs that format CDs and let you drag and drop files to them are doing what's known as Packet Writing. If you have the same version of the same program, installed on two different machines, you should be able to transfer the disc between the two systems and use it as you expect, like a giant floppy. However, the specifications for Packet Writing are subject to much interpretation, so different implementation (different programs) and even different versions of the same program, will often (usually) not work with another version, which is what you're seeing. In fact, different drives can implement it differently. A drive with Mt. Rainier support will do packet writing one way, and another drive, which doesn't support Mt. Rainier won't be able to use that disc.

 

Add to that the fact that packet writing is the least reliable way to write to CD, often causing data loss, and the fact that you're apparently using CD-RW (erasable) media, and you're "looking for trouble", to coin a phrase.

 

You'll find that if you instead bring up ECDC with a Data CD project, add your files to the project, and burn them to a blank (not formatted) disc, you'll be able to read that on almost any system. And other systems will be able to add more sessions to the same disc (as long as there is room and you don't close the disc). In fact, XP has built-in CD burning capability where you can drag-and-drop files to your CD writer, and it will queue them up until you tell it to write them to the disc, which it will do in a session, not using packet writing.

 

So, to sum up, you're better off not formatting the disc, but instead writing sessions.

 

Hope that helps!

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Add to that the fact that packet writing is the least reliable way to write to CD, often causing data loss, and the fact that you're apparently using CD-RW (erasable) media, and you're "looking for trouble", to coin a phrase.

 

So, to sum up, you're better off not formatting the disc, but instead writing sessions.

 

Hope that helps!

 

Sounds like another case of "Basic False Analogy" - you format the floppy before you use it, therefore you format the CD-R or CD-RW before using it. However, formatting the disc is primerily useful for either short-term usage such as transferring data between computers if there are NO other options, and there is a backup, OR for permantly losing the data. Reliable programs use Sessions, and a BLANK blank, directly out of the package or off the spindle.

 

CD-R media is burned by "cooking" a dye to create the pits and lands (the physiscal equivilent of the magnetic 0s' and 1's used by magnetic media like floppys), and is fairly stable. CD-RW media is created by melting and recrystalizing an aluminum alloy, which promptly starts to de-crystalize - taking all the data with it. (Commercial media has the pits and lands physically pressed into the metal.)

 

If you don't want to use CD-Rs, try a Flash drive (aka Pen / Thumb / Keychain / Jump drive).

 

Lynn

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Thank you so much for answering me. The problem with the XP burning CD capability is that it is very slow, since it has to write the file to the CDRW rather than just copying and pasting. Every night, I make a copy of a file to my CDRW from my database on my business computer and copy this file to my home computer. Then if I update it at home, I then replace the file on the CDRW with an updated file, but with the same name. This copying is done daily back and forth between my home and business computer. Besides that, I always have 7 CDRW's labeled for each day of the week, where I copy that days file and every week the day is replaced with the new day file.

 

It's so much easier and quicker to just be able to copy and paste the file back and forth.

 

Any suggestions?

 

Thanks,

Ann

 

Thank you so much for answering me. The problem with the XP burning CD capability is that it is very slow, since it has to write the file to the CDRW rather than just copying and pasting. Every night, I make a copy of a file to my CDRW from my database on my business computer and copy this file to my home computer. Then if I update it at home, I then replace the file on the CDRW with an updated file, but with the same name. This copying is done daily back and forth between my home and business computer. Besides that, I always have 7 CDRW's labeled for each day of the week, where I copy that days file and every week the day is replaced with the new day file.

 

It's so much easier and quicker to just be able to copy and paste the file back and forth.

 

Any suggestions?

 

Thanks,

Ann

 

Well, the programs that format CDs and let you drag and drop files to them are doing what's known as Packet Writing. If you have the same version of the same program, installed on two different machines, you should be able to transfer the disc between the two systems and use it as you expect, like a giant floppy. However, the specifications for Packet Writing are subject to much interpretation, so different implementation (different programs) and even different versions of the same program, will often (usually) not work with another version, which is what you're seeing. In fact, different drives can implement it differently. A drive with Mt. Rainier support will do packet writing one way, and another drive, which doesn't support Mt. Rainier won't be able to use that disc.

 

Add to that the fact that packet writing is the least reliable way to write to CD, often causing data loss, and the fact that you're apparently using CD-RW (erasable) media, and you're "looking for trouble", to coin a phrase.

 

You'll find that if you instead bring up ECDC with a Data CD project, add your files to the project, and burn them to a blank (not formatted) disc, you'll be able to read that on almost any system. And other systems will be able to add more sessions to the same disc (as long as there is room and you don't close the disc). In fact, XP has built-in CD burning capability where you can drag-and-drop files to your CD writer, and it will queue them up until you tell it to write them to the disc, which it will do in a session, not using packet writing.

 

So, to sum up, you're better off not formatting the disc, but instead writing sessions.

 

Hope that helps!

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It's so much easier and quicker to just be able to copy and paste the file back and forth.

 

Any suggestions?

 

Thanks,

Ann

Sure, install the same version of Direct CD, or Sonic DLA on both machines. Only one packet writing application can be installed on a PC at any one time. With any luck, you'll be able to transfer the disc and files as you want.

 

Failing that, opt for a "thumb drive" solution. Possibly even more convenient than a CD. Use a couple for redundency, as you are with the CD-RWs.

 

Hope that helps!

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Thank you so much for answering me. The problem with the XP burning CD capability is that it is very slow, since it has to write the file to the CDRW rather than just copying and pasting. Every night, I make a copy of a file to my CDRW from my database on my business computer and copy this file to my home computer. Then if I update it at home, I then replace the file on the CDRW with an updated file, but with the same name. This copying is done daily back and forth between my home and business computer. Besides that, I always have 7 CDRW's labeled for each day of the week, where I copy that days file and every week the day is replaced with the new day file.

 

It's so much easier and quicker to just be able to copy and paste the file back and forth.

 

Any suggestions?

 

Thanks,

Ann

If one burner is Mt Rainier capable and the other is not, format with the non-Mt Rainier capable drive.

 

However, using Packet-Writing is asking for trouble. One of these days you, too, will put the formatted CD-RW in the drive and it will tell you to put a CD in the drive.

 

Formatting a CD-R is better. But a Flash drive would be your safest bet.

 

Lynn

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