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Having Trouble With Transferring Pictures To Dvd


mrwilson31

Question

I have version 9.0 basic home edition.

 

I was able to burn some photos onto at DVD +RW.

I am unable to view the files once they are on the DVD.

 

I am not trying to do anything special! I just want to be able to archive these photos onto DVD rather than CD's.

 

Any help would be appreciated. THanks.

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We'll need a lot more information from you before we can help without wild guesses, please.

 

-What programs does your 'Basic' suite have, and which one did you use to burn the files?

I am using the software that came with the computer- I have not upgraded. It is I believe Roxio Easy Creator v9.

I just used the data burn portion of the program. It is very simple. THe DVD gets formatted and it copies it over to the DVD.

Is there something not getting burned to the DVD. Such as a decoder in order for the files to be displayed

 

-Where are you trying to view the files? On your computer or a DVD player?

 

I am just trying to view the files on my PC from the DVD just burned.

 

The DVD's are

-How are you trying to view the files? What program are you using to look?

 

Windows Picture Viewer

 

-If you use 'My Computer' and open the drive with the disc in it, can you see the directory or list of files on the disc?

 

I can see the directory and the list of files.

 

TO your last point. Why would I want to use the DVD+-R discs rather than RW for archiving.

 

In case I overlook this later, you are going to use DVD+-R discs rather than RW for archiving once you sort out how to do it, aren't you.

 

Regards,

Mike

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Hi Mike,

 

There are several separate questions here. I'll try to deal with them all.

 

(1) TO your last point. Why would I want to use the DVD+-R discs rather than RW for archiving.

 

RW discs are not a good idea for archiving. They are not as long-lived as R discs, although they are costlier, so we recommend them only for short-term storage, or trying out ways of creating discs. I mentioned this, because if I hadn't then somebody else would have broken into the topic and delivered you a lecture on it. :)

 

 

(2) I just used the data burn portion of the program. It is very simple. THe DVD gets formatted and it copies it over to the DVD.

Is there something not getting burned to the DVD. Such as a decoder in order for the files to be displayed

 

Okay. This is the other subject which draws a cut-n-paste lecture from that person, so I'll explain some things to prevent the tirade.

-There are two optical disc burning methods commonly used in computing, and they're commonly called packet-writing, and authoring or mastering.

 

-Packet writing uses a specially formatted disc and files are individually written to this formatted disc. The advantage is that you can treat it like a big floppy disc or flash drive. The disadvantages are many - the method wears out RW discs faster; formatting uses up significant amounts of space as overhead; the discs produced usually can't be read without special software; they can't be read on DVD players which play JPGs or MP3s, etc, etc. The biggest disadvantage is that the format isn't universal, so interchangeability of discs between systems can be difficult if not impossible. The Sonic/Roxio packet-writing programs are DLA and Drag-to-Disc. The Nero one is InCD.

 

-Authoring is a method where you assemble a CD or DVD in a program such as Creator Classic, Disc Copier, Record Now!, etc, and then write it to a standard disc in a large chunk or session. The session can fill the disc, or there might be room for several sessions before it's full. The main thing is that the files are usually written in bunches, and a standard disc is produced which can be read by any PC without the need for special readers. Some find it not so easy as packet writing, but it doesn't waste as much space, and the disc is a standard type, which is also readable on a large number of DVD players.

 

 

Right. The lesson now out of the way, it looks as if you've been using Drag-to-Disc so far, and on RW discs as well. Ooops! That's not recommended.

By all means use RW discs to try things out, but use R discs for the final archive.

 

I don't know why Windows Picture Viewer is not displaying the pictures in the files on your packet-written disc. It should be able to, if you can see the list of files in the directory. I'd copy one or two of the files back off the DVD onto the hard drive, to verify that they were properly written on the DVD, and I'd try to view those files from the HD with Windows Picture Viewer. You didn't say what did happen when you tried to view the files, so I can't take this one much further at this point.

 

What I would suggest is that you run Creator Classic, arrange the picture files you want burned, and then burn them to a blank DVD to try this out. You can use a DVDRW for this, as long as it is erased, not formatted. Once you get the hang of it, you can burn your collection to DVDR to archive the pictures. The important suggestion here is, verify that you can read all the files back from the disc before you erase any originals.

 

Sorry this was so long, but I hope it has made things simpler rather than more complicated.

 

Regards,

Brendon

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We'll need a lot more information from you before we can help without wild guesses, please.

 

-What programs does your 'Basic' suite have, and which one did you use to burn the files?

-Where are you trying to view the files? On your computer or a DVD player?

-How are you trying to view the files? What program are you using to look?

-If you use 'My Computer' and open the drive with the disc in it, can you see the directory or list of files on the disc?

 

 

In case I overlook this later, you are going to use DVD+-R discs rather than RW for archiving once you sort out how to do it, aren't you.

 

Regards,

Brendon

 

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