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Hdv Native Burns In Toast 9.0.2 Bd-rs On Power Pc Mac

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Surprise, surprise - my persistance paid off. Tech support was apparently misinformed by their own literature when they told me I needed either a Power PC G5 or an Intel machine to burn HD. Wrong!

I just exported a Final Cut Pro (Sony) HDV 1080i Native project that ran 1.5 hours, on my Power PC G4 laptop (OS 10.4.11), exporting it as a Quicktime Movie, self contained, and Toast 9 took it into the Video Disc, Blu Ray content window listing it as the MPEG-2, HDV 1080i file that it was and encoded it (12 hours) avg Bit Rate 19, 25 Mbps Max, and burned it to a BD-R disc (6 hours) and both my Sony BDP-S500 and my Samsung BD-P1200 Blu Ray players play it beautifully (as BD-ROM). Apparently their Toast 9.0.2 update fixed this problem? without their knowledge of this? Anyway, I am a HAPPY CAMPER after waiting for over 2 years to burn Blu Rays on my Mac with Final Cut Studio 2!!

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Surprise, surprise - my persistance paid off. Tech support was apparently misinformed by their own literature when they told me I needed either a Power PC G5 or an Intel machine to burn HD. Wrong!

I just exported a Final Cut Pro (Sony) HDV 1080i Native project that ran 1.5 hours, on my Power PC G4 laptop (OS 10.4.11), exporting it as a Quicktime Movie, self contained, and Toast 9 took it into the Video Disc, Blu Ray content window listing it as the MPEG-2, HDV 1080i file that it was and encoded it (12 hours) avg Bit Rate 19, 25 Mbps Max, and burned it to a BD-R disc (6 hours) and both my Sony BDP-S500 and my Samsung BD-P1200 Blu Ray players play it beautifully (as BD-ROM). Apparently their Toast 9.0.2 update fixed this problem? without their knowledge of this? Anyway, I am a HAPPY CAMPER after waiting for over 2 years to burn Blu Rays on my Mac with Final Cut Studio 2!!

 

Hi,

Cool, I am new here and I am in same boat as you, and use FCS 2, also, did you use Compessor at all when exporting? QT. conversion? I use ProRes 422, and I was just wondering what did when exporting, as I read you said you just exported it as HDV 1080i? Thanks For You Help, Tim C.

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Hi,

Cool, I am new here and I am in same boat as you, and use FCS 2, also, did you use Compessor at all when exporting? QT. conversion? I use ProRes 422, and I was just wondering what did when exporting, as I read you said you just exported it as HDV 1080i? Thanks For You Help, Tim C.

 

I have always found, and it was true in this instance, that Compressor is VERY SLOW, and I have

never been able to detect any improvement in quality. I'm still running tests to refine my process.

But I exported the FCP 2, 95 minute, HDV 1080i native sequence using Quick Time, as a self contained movie and no recompression. It took 45 minutes to export in QT and would have taken

Compressor 24 hours. I'm testing today the respective encode time in Toast 9 to send and

burn to BD-RE. Also experimenting using Compressor export as an MPEG 2 Transport Stream

to Blu Ray in Compressor. I have never used, nor likely will use ProRes 422 or the Inbermediate

Codec, I stay Native HDV and seems to save a lot of time and confusion.

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I have always found, and it was true in this instance, that Compressor is VERY SLOW, and I have

never been able to detect any improvement in quality. I'm still running tests to refine my process.

But I exported the FCP 2, 95 minute, HDV 1080i native sequence using Quick Time, as a self contained movie and no recompression. It took 45 minutes to export in QT and would have taken

Compressor 24 hours. I'm testing today the respective encode time in Toast 9 to send and

burn to BD-RE. Also experimenting using Compressor export as an MPEG 2 Transport Stream

to Blu Ray in Compressor. I have never used, nor likely will use ProRes 422 or the Inbermediate

Codec, I stay Native HDV and seems to save a lot of time and confusion.

 

Hi

Thank your for your imput and it will be interestering to see what you come up with. I use ProRes because it is a cleaner codec than HDV, and its to render quicker for me. I am currently editing a project an will begin the new Blu-Ray burning process very soon. I do know that H.264 is terrible to work with as opposed to HDV exported in a full quality in rendering out from FCP. Thank you again for your help, and it will interesting to see what you find that works well. Thanks Tim

 

I have always found, and it was true in this instance, that Compressor is VERY SLOW, and I have

never been able to detect any improvement in quality. I'm still running tests to refine my process.

But I exported the FCP 2, 95 minute, HDV 1080i native sequence using Quick Time, as a self contained movie and no recompression. It took 45 minutes to export in QT and would have taken

Compressor 24 hours. I'm testing today the respective encode time in Toast 9 to send and

burn to BD-RE. Also experimenting using Compressor export as an MPEG 2 Transport Stream

to Blu Ray in Compressor. I have never used, nor likely will use ProRes 422 or the Inbermediate

Codec, I stay Native HDV and seems to save a lot of time and confusion.

 

Hi

Thank your for your imput and it will be interestering to see what you come up with. I use ProRes because it is a cleaner codec than HDV, and its to render quicker for me. I am currently editing a project an will begin the new Blu-Ray burning process very soon. I do know that H.264 is terrible to work with as opposed to HDV exported in a full quality in rendering out from FCP. Thank you again for your help, and it will interesting to see what you find that works well. Thanks Tim

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I have always found, and it was true in this instance, that Compressor is VERY SLOW, and I have

never been able to detect any improvement in quality. I'm still running tests to refine my process.

But I exported the FCP 2, 95 minute, HDV 1080i native sequence using Quick Time, as a self contained movie and no recompression. It took 45 minutes to export in QT and would have taken

Compressor 24 hours. I'm testing today the respective encode time in Toast 9 to send and

burn to BD-RE. Also experimenting using Compressor export as an MPEG 2 Transport Stream

to Blu Ray in Compressor. I have never used, nor likely will use ProRes 422 or the Inbermediate

Codec, I stay Native HDV and seems to save a lot of time and confusion.

 

Hi

Thank your for your imput and it will be interestering to see what you come up with. I use ProRes because it is a cleaner codec than HDV, and its to render quicker for me. I am currently editing a project an will begin the new Blu-Ray burning process very soon. I do know that H.264 is terrible to work with as opposed to HDV exported in a full quality in rendering out from FCP. Thank you again for your help, and it will interesting to see what you find that works well. Thanks Tim

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