Jump to content
  • 0

Multi-core Compatibility


CarManDSL

Question

I am researching to purchase a MacPro. Great that we can buy 2 processors with 8 cores, but unless the software is written for multi core, all that processing power is not much use. Software vendors seldom advertise "multi-core" compatibility, or better yet announce something like "Our product XXXX is written to utilize the full processing potential of multi core CPU's." I haven't found any such claim on Roxio's site. (Did I miss this somewhere?)

 

We know that multi-core CPU's are best suited for intensive video encoding, but is Toast 9 written to benefit from this technology especially since it can now encode for BD?

 

 

 

(As I write this, I am test encoding a 2 min HD clip into BD format to be burned onto a DVD, with a G4 1,42 Dual. At the highest possible quality and bit rate, Activity Monitor shows the CPU's running at 100%. After 20 minutes, Toast 9.0.2 has completed only 30% ! This will take ages to encode a full 60 min BD!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

Referring to Toast 9.0.2

 

In fact toast 9.0.2 uses all 8 cores on a MacPro 8 core 2.8 GHz (2008) at about 90% during encoding while I am writing these notes. Project: HDV 1080i (MPEG2) from FCP encoded into MPEG4 for Blu-ray. Note: encoding seems faster than realtime. Settings based on MPEG-4 AVC, average data rate 22.0 Mbps, Max Bitrate 26.0 Mbps, Motion Estimation = optimal. Audio = PCM, 48 KHz, 16-bit, stereo.

:)

 

Referring to Toast 9.0.2

 

In fact toast 9.0.2 uses all 8 cores on a MacPro 8 core 2.8 GHz (2008) at about 90% during encoding while I am writing these notes. Project: HDV 1080i (MPEG2) from FCP encoded into MPEG4 for Blu-ray. Note: encoding seems faster than realtime. Settings based on MPEG-4 AVC, average data rate 22.0 Mbps, Max Bitrate 26.0 Mbps, Motion Estimation = optimal. Audio = PCM, 48 KHz, 16-bit, stereo.

:)

 

Referring to Toast 9.0.2

 

In fact toast 9.0.2 uses all 8 cores on a MacPro 8 core 2.8 GHz (2008) at about 90% during encoding while I am writing these notes. Project: HDV 1080i (MPEG2) from FCP encoded into MPEG4 for Blu-ray. Note: encoding seems faster than realtime. Settings based on MPEG-4 AVC, average data rate 22.0 Mbps, Max Bitrate 26.0 Mbps, Motion Estimation = optimal. Audio = PCM, 48 KHz, 16-bit, stereo.

:)

 

Referring to Toast 9.0.2

 

In fact toast 9.0.2 uses all 8 cores on a MacPro 8 core 2.8 GHz (2008) at about 90% during encoding while I am writing these notes. Project: HDV 1080i (MPEG2) from FCP encoded into MPEG4 for Blu-ray. Note: encoding seems faster than realtime. Settings based on MPEG-4 AVC, average data rate 22.0 Mbps, Max Bitrate 26.0 Mbps, Motion Estimation = optimal. Audio = PCM, 48 KHz, 16-bit, stereo.

:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Toast 8 and 9 gleefully grab 100% of both cores in my iMac C2D chip.

 

Maybe things change when you have 2 chips like the 8 core, but they've always grabbed as much as they want from both cores, even for very short multiplexing operations.

 

Don't know if this helps or confuses the issue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Simply - no. I max out at 20% on my 8 x 2.8 machine. I compress with Compressor 3 first.

 

 

Thanks for your comments.

Thought that someone from Roxio would reply, but I guess their silence confirms your experience, Toast 9 is NOT multi core compatible.

 

My test BD on DVD for a 2 min 11 sec HD clip exported from iMovie HD in MPEG 4 format on my G4 1.42 Dual, took 3 hours and 15 min to compress and format with Toast 9! By interpolation, a 60 min BD from HD content will take 90 HOURS to encode!

 

What format do you encode to with Compressor 3 before using Toast 9?

How long does it take the MacPro 2.8 X 8 for Toast 9 to format a BD?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Toast 9 DOES support multi core

 

As a follow-up to my comments when I started this thread, I have received my Mac Pro 2.8, 8 core and made the same BD onto DVD as I mentioned.

 

On the G4 1.42 Dual with 1.5GB RAM, the 2 min 11 sec HD MPEG4 clip exported from iMovie, took a whopping 3 hrs 15 min to encode into BD and save as an Image file. Both processors ran at 100%.

 

The Mac Pro 2.8, 8 core has a 3 x 500GB RAID 0, 2 GB RAM. The same process took an amazing 6 min! All 8 cores ran at 65 to 70%.

 

In conclusion, I confirm with Shorafix that Roxio Toast 9 DOES utilize all cores.

 

Shorafix, please post your exact Mac Pro configuration so that I can determine why your system used 90% and mine only 65-70% of the 8 cores.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am researching to purchase a MacPro. Great that we can buy 2 processors with 8 cores, but unless the software is written for multi core, all that processing power is not much use. Software vendors seldom advertise "multi-core" compatibility, or better yet announce something like "Our product XXXX is written to utilize the full processing potential of multi core CPU's." I haven't found any such claim on Roxio's site. (Did I miss this somewhere?)

 

We know that multi-core CPU's are best suited for intensive video encoding, but is Toast 9 written to benefit from this technology especially since it can now encode for BD?

 

 

 

(As I write this, I am test encoding a 2 min HD clip into BD format to be burned onto a DVD, with a G4 1,42 Dual. At the highest possible quality and bit rate, Activity Monitor shows the CPU's running at 100%. After 20 minutes, Toast 9.0.2 has completed only 30% ! This will take ages to encode a full 60 min BD!)

 

Simply - no. I max out at 20% on my 8 x 2.8 machine. I compress with Compressor 3 first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...