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Blu-ray Jaggies


Ted Spencer

Question

I just tried Toast 9 today to burn a Blu-Ray dvd (using standard DVD media) and no matter what I've tried so far it comes out with poor quality. Very obvious alaising "jaggies" everywhere. MPEG 4, MPEG 2, bitrate up to max - all look the same. It looks far worse than output from FCP/Compressor on an SD DVD. Source is 24f 720x1280 DVCPROHD footage from a Panasonic HVX200 (with the same source clip in both cases). What gives?

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I just tried Toast 9 today to burn a Blu-Ray dvd (using standard DVD media) and no matter what I've tried so far it comes out with poor quality. Very obvious alaising "jaggies" everywhere. MPEG 4, MPEG 2, bitrate up to max - all look the same. It looks far worse than output from FCP/Compressor on an SD DVD. Source is 24f 720x1280 DVCPROHD footage from a Panasonic HVX200 (with the same source clip in both cases). What gives?

 

We have done this too. No problems at all. We use 720 30PN. Maybe it is the 24P setting. We encode the DVCPro HD as .H264 after editing. It seems most BD players prefer this to MPEG2 and the quality seems better. I don't recommend the 24P setting except for transfers to film.

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I had the exact same problem with 24p and 30p footage shot on HVX200 when encoding to bluray...

 

SOLUTION:

 

Before encoding the material set the preference button to CUSTOM

 

Video format: MPEG-2

 

Below the motion estimation slider CHANGE the options from automatic:

 

Reencoding: ALWAYS (or program will seek previous file to burn which contains the horrible jaggies)

Field Dominance : PROGRESSIVE

Aspect Ratio: 16:9

 

Bottom line don't use DEFAULT (automatic) settings SWITCH THE SETTINGS TO PROGRESSIVE.

 

I used 10Mbps as an average Bit Rate (16Mps max) Motion estimation BEST.

 

Also noticed by using MPEG-2 over MPEG-4 saved a whole lot of time encoding... a lot given how slow encoder works.

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We have done this too. No problems at all. We use 720 30PN. Maybe it is the 24P setting. We encode the DVCPro HD as .H264 after editing. It seems most BD players prefer this to MPEG2 and the quality seems better. I don't recommend the 24P setting except for transfers to film.

Does toast re encode your h.264 footage? or does it just write your file directly to BD? Are you creating an image file first then burning... detailed instructions would be great.

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We have done this too. No problems at all. We use 720 30PN. Maybe it is the 24P setting. We encode the DVCPro HD as .H264 after editing. It seems most BD players prefer this to MPEG2 and the quality seems better. I don't recommend the 24P setting except for transfers to film.

 

The SD DVD file I burned was from the same 24f DVCPROHD file, and looked excellent. 24f is routinely handled by every DVD or Blu-Ray player without a problem (the players themselves pull the frame rate up to 29.97 NTSC), so that's not likely the answer.

 

Maybe you're right about the pre-encode though. Perhaps trying to use the raw DVCPROHD file is the issue. Seems it should be fine (and it does work, it just looks terrible). I'll try a pre-encode from FCP next time.

 

Anyone else have any light to shed on this?

 

Thanks!

 

 

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