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Converting From Vhs?


MarkSeattle

Question

I'm not an expert in this at all...

 

I've converted audio tapes to MP3 using Griffin tools, which was pretty easy. I imagine its just as easy with this Toast.

 

This Toast 9 looks like I can use it to convert a bunch of old VHS tapes with stuff my wife wants to keep.

 

What do I need to convert the VCR output into something digital into the Mac so Toast 9 can burn it onto a DVD?

 

What's out there to use, and what is good and what should be avoided!?

 

Thanks!

Mark

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4 answers to this question

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Freecam,

 

I'd like to know how you hookup your Sony SVP-5600 component video. I have a SVP-5600 also but the component video doesn't seem to work. Is there some kind of switch in the SVP-5600 to turn on the component video output? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

 

Camo

-----------------

 

The critical part in tranferring VHS to a digital format is in the quality of the player. I have a Sony SVP-5600 player which originally sold for $8000, yes that's $8000. The quality of the heads and transport as well as the electronics brings out the best possible reproduction of VHS which I'm glad to see going the way of the passenger pigeon. The deck has component output and can easily be connected to an external A/D converter and into the digital world.

 

If you only have a small number of tapes it's probably better to go to a duplication house to have them transferred to something like DVD or DV tape. You can also rent decks like mine and do it yourself.

 

Another issue is that sometimes tapes play back best in the original camcorder they were recorded in. That's because the heads are aligned for that tape. I did this recently with a customer who got me to put all his home movies on DVD. I borrowed his camera and got the best results.

 

Panasonic and JVC make DV/VHS recorders that also do great transfers and you can throughput the VHS directly to firewire and then digitize into your computer if you want to edit or custom burn DVD.

 

Most people do an awful job of transferring because they use a cheap VHS player that's ready for the Monday morning pickup.

 

Freecam

 

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The critical part in tranferring VHS to a digital format is in the quality of the player. I have a Sony SVP-5600 player which originally sold for $8000, yes that's $8000. The quality of the heads and transport as well as the electronics brings out the best possible reproduction of VHS which I'm glad to see going the way of the passenger pigeon. The deck has component output and can easily be connected to an external A/D converter and into the digital world.

 

If you only have a small number of tapes it's probably better to go to a duplication house to have them transferred to something like DVD or DV tape. You can also rent decks like mine and do it yourself.

 

Another issue is that sometimes tapes play back best in the original camcorder they were recorded in. That's because the heads are aligned for that tape. I did this recently with a customer who got me to put all his home movies on DVD. I borrowed his camera and got the best results.

 

Panasonic and JVC make DV/VHS recorders that also do great transfers and you can throughput the VHS directly to firewire and then digitize into your computer if you want to edit or custom burn DVD.

 

Most people do an awful job of transferring because they use a cheap VHS player that's ready for the Monday morning pickup.

 

Freecam

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I have had good results using the "Dazzle" DV bridge:

http://www.amazon.com/Dazzle-Hollywood-Fir...1388&sr=8-1

 

but I imagine there are newer devices available. Make sure you use a firewire-based device. When I bought the Dazzle DV converter there was not a USB device with sufficient throughput, although this may not be true anymore.

 

There are also DVD recorders that permit dubbing from a built-in VCR. This would not involve your Mac at all, of course, and the menus would be more limited as far as customization is concerned.

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Canopus and Miglia make good analog-to-digital video transfer devices. You also can use many DV camcorders that have analog-to-digital passthrough. Another option is the EyeTV 250+ which captures as MPEG 2 rather than DV. MPEG 2 is difficult to edit except for trimming out sections but it takes up less much less hard drive space and is already in the format used for video DVDs (which means it saves time with encoding).

 

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