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Files Copied Are "read-only"


hutben3

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Hi, I'm using Easy CD Creator 5. I've no problem copying and reading the files I've copied onto the CD-RW but I can't save any modification I've done to them. No problem with the PC - Windows XP Pro, etc.

I've made plenty of music CD's with no problem. Do I need to update to a newer, fuller version?

(hopefully I can locate this post once I post it.)

 

Thanks for your input,

Pete

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Hi, I'm using Easy CD Creator 5. I've no problem copying and reading the files I've copied onto the CD-RW but I can't save any modification I've done to them. No problem with the PC - Windows XP Pro, etc.

I've made plenty of music CD's with no problem. Do I need to update to a newer, fuller version?

(hopefully I can locate this post once I post it.)

 

Thanks for your input,

Pete

 

What is the purpose of copying the data to CD? If the idea is to permantly LOSE all the data, then using RW is the way to do it. RW media is fine for testing, because it can be erased and re-used. It is a ROTTEN form of storage. (R and RW burn the same way; you do not "delete" a file from RW media anymore than you "delete" a file from R media - you just remove it form the TOC [Table of Contents] so you can't find it. You don't get the space back until you erase the ENTIRE RW disc.)

 

Getting back to your question, if you have used a Sessions-based program such as Data Disc, then what you have is effectively the same as a commercially-pressed CD. That is, it IS read-only, and that is the way it is.

 

You do NOT have a "great-big floppy-disc".

 

If what you want is a "great-big floppy-disc", get a Flash drive (aka Thumb / Pen / Keychain / Jump drive). A Zip drive would also work, but if you use WinXP, be absolutely sure to ALWAYS use the eject command (not the button on the drive) or WinXP will EAT the disc AND the drive. (No, I don't like WinxP.)

 

Lynn

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What is the purpose of copying the data to CD? If the idea is to permantly LOSE all the data, then using RW is the way to do it. RW media is fine for testing, because it can be erased and re-used. It is a ROTTEN form of storage. (R and RW burn the same way; you do not "delete" a file from RW media anymore than you "delete" a file from R media - you just remove it form the TOC [Table of Contents] so you can't find it. You don't get the space back until you erase the ENTIRE RW disc.)

 

Getting back to your question, if you have used a Sessions-based program such as Data Disc, then what you have is effectively the same as a commercially-pressed CD. That is, it IS read-only, and that is the way it is.

 

You do NOT have a "great-big floppy-disc".

 

If what you want is a "great-big floppy-disc", get a Flash drive (aka Thumb / Pen / Keychain / Jump drive). A Zip drive would also work, but if you use WinXP, be absolutely sure to ALWAYS use the eject command (not the button on the drive) or WinXP will EAT the disc AND the drive. (No, I don't like WinxP.)

 

Lynn

 

 

Lynn,

Thanks for you input. I'm trying to establish back-up files on CD. I thought since I might be adding files to the CD I should use an RW. But you think I should use a CD-R for the back-up CD? I don't want to go out and purchase a ZIP Drive at this time.

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Lynn,

Thanks for you input. I'm trying to establish back-up files on CD. I thought since I might be adding files to the CD I should use an RW. But you think I should use a CD-R for the back-up CD? I don't want to go out and purchase a ZIP Drive at this time.

For purposes of recording, there is NO DIFFERENCE between a CD-R and a CD-RW, as I said before. The difference comes with the fact the CD-RW can be erased and reused, AND it will fade out on its own sooner or later - if formatted for Packet-Writing (DirectCD, Drag2Disc, Nero's InCD, Sonic's DLA, etc) usually sooner.

 

R media records by "cooking" a dye with the laser - not quite as stable as a commercial CD which has the data physically pressed into the aluminum, but close. RW media records by melting and re-crystalizing an aluminum alloy with the laser - and the alloy promptly starts to de-crystalize, taking the data with it. (It is "erased" by deliberately de-crystalizing the alloy.)

 

For making a backup, use CD-R and a Sessions-based program such as DataProject.

 

If you want to read it in almost any CD drive, close it after 1 session. It is possible to add sessions - and someone else will need to provide details if you can't understand the help files - but the extra sessions may only be readable on a CD-burner, and even then it can be iffy. (With newer programs, such as EMC 7 and above, or the one built into WinXP, there aren't the problems.)

 

Basicly, if you want to KEEP the data,

(1) NEVER format the disc, and

(2) NEVER use CD-RW.

 

Lynn

 

PS - no, you cannot edit and re-save with EITHER CD-R or CD-RW, any more than you can edit and re-save a commercially pressed music or software CD.

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Some additional thoughts . . .

 

I would stay far away from zip drives - they are less reliable than optical media.

 

I have not had any significant problems using cd-rw media, as long as you buy decent quality media and use it in a properly functioning burner. I have had only 1 disc go bad in all the years I've been using cd-rw media, and it was a budget no-name brand.

 

However, I absolutely agree with the comments about packet writing (DirectCD). It seems to lose its way at very inopportune times causing unrecoverable data.

 

Following is some generic info I share with folks - in case any of it relates to your question about updating files which have been burned to optical media.

 

Roxio Easy CD Creator – Saving and Moving Data Files Between Computers

DataCD Project vs. DirectCD

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

DirectCD is packet writing software and provides the ability to burn and copy files on cd media using "drag & drop" actions in Windows Explorer similar to working with floppy or hard disc drives. This requires formatting the cd media in DirectCD before you can use it in this way. In order to read one of these cd's on a computer which does not have DirectCD installed, you must have a "udf reader" installed on that computer. The first time you insert a cd made in the fashion described above on a computer which does not have the udf reader installed, it should offer to install the udf reader. You can also go to the "software updates" download area and download the latest udf reader program. There are options to close the DirectCD media so it can be read on any computer (without the udf reader). DirectCD made discs can be very fussy and unreliable. It doesn't seem to take much to cause them to become unreadable and require erasing and reformatting. It is especially important to always use keyboard commands to "eject" a DirectCD disc so the program has a chance to finish any writing processes it has remaining. Always "eject" a DirectCD disc from your burner before shutting down the computer for the same reason. But it IS convenient to be able to work with your cd burner media like we are used to working with floppy and hard disc media.

 

The DataCD Project process does not use formatted media, and works much like other Easy Cd Creator "Project" activities. You would design and build a "project layout", and then burn that project to a cd. The best approach is to "finalize session, don't finalize cd" so you can add more files later on, if you choose. Whenever you add a session later, you must remember to "import previous session" or you will lose the pointers to the files in earlier sessions. You can also set your preferences to always "import previous session". A cd made in this fashion is usable on most any computer and all the files written to the cd across multiple "sessions" will appear to be all part of the most recent session, as long as you have always "imported previous session". It should also be noted that files are changed to "read-only" when written to cd in this manner. If you want to open a file to make changes later on, you will need to copy it to your hard disc and uncheck "read only" under properties for the file. If you are running under a WinXP operating system, the original "read-only" status should be restored when copying a file to your hard disc from the cd. ISO9660 is supposed to be the most cross-platform compatible file system, but Joliet provides the most flexibility in file naming.

 

I used to use DirectCD formatted cdrw media to move files from computer to computer installing the udf reader on any computer I wanted to be able to use the media on. But it seems to be more trouble than it is worth, so I rarely use it at all anymore.

 

I use DataCD Project to save important files, programs, etc. If it is to be permanent, I use cd-r media and "finalize session, don't finalize cd" so I can "import previous session" and add more sessions later. If it is to be temporary storage and I want to re-use the media, I use the same process, but use cd-rw media, so I can erase it later on and start over.

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