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Vista Clock Is Ticking


gi7omy

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Regardless of the apparent reluctance on the part of midmarket CIOs to adopt the Windows Vista operating system, experts agree waiting much longer probably isn't a good idea.

A new Gartner Inc. survey conducted late last year found that less than 1% of business desktops in the U.S. are running Vista. Only about 2.5% of laptops are using the operating system.

 

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Regardless of the apparent reluctance on the part of midmarket CIOs to adopt the Windows Vista operating system, experts agree waiting much longer probably isn't a good idea.

A new Gartner Inc. survey conducted late last year found that less than 1% of business desktops in the U.S. are running Vista. Only about 2.5% of laptops are using the operating system.

 

READ THE FULL STORY

Which might be the reason they're pushing the release of 'Windows 7' up a bit.

I don't really think it's because Vista is bad (I don't think it is) but it's likely a number of things. It gets expensive to retrofit, upgrade and purchase new equipment each time Bill decides he needs to increase his cashflow. And, there's the training aspect as well.

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As someone who has tons of software that won't run on Vista, why would a company want to switch to an O/S that 'breaks' most of the existing software on their computers?

 

I don't have much sympathy for Microsoft's low sales. They should have listened to their customers who only want to run their existing software.

 

Getting the IT departments to install Vista is an expense, but re-training all their employees in the updated or new applications required to run on Vista is a huge expense for most companies.

 

And they quoted a mayor of HICKORY, North Carolina?....I just had to look it up......population around 40,000 people....furniture and fiber optic cable manufacturing....... and even they are only replacing older computers with new ones running Vista.

 

Apparently he couldn't find any CEO's willing to comment on why 99% of their computers aren't running Vista.

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ml, I'm just curious about what software you can't run in Vista. I couldn't run Acronis Disk Director after updating to SP1 but was told to 'keep trying'. After a few weeks of occasional trying, it worked. I know drivers are not as much an issue anymore as most have been updated but may have incorrectly assumed the worst is over.

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ml, I'm just curious about what software you can't run in Vista. I couldn't run Acronis Disk Director after updating to SP1 but was told to 'keep trying'. After a few weeks of occasional trying, it worked. I know drivers are not as much an issue anymore as most have been updated but may have incorrectly assumed the worst is over.

My dad has some old hardware that isn't supported by Vista since it dropped support for the old game port (joystick for flight simulator) and parallel port (scanner). So, that was a bit of a disappointment when he bought his new system and couldn't use either of those pieces of hardware anymore. That's a driver issue for sure. :glare:

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Earlier, each OS was a 'must-have' because there were major improvements.

 

Same for Office. From Office 97 to Office 2000 there were significant improvements in spreadsheets and slideshows.

 

When Offices 2003 came along, MS finally did a huge ad campaign that it was about security, and finally businesses fell into line - including buying enough copies to give employees so security wasn't compromised at home.

 

So what does Office 2007 offer besides a new file format system that isn't compatible with anything else?

 

What does Vista offer that you can't do (and need/want to do) in WinXP? Most business don't really need a high-end DVD burning OS. Backup data CDs are about it.

 

What I'm trying to say is, why get Vista unless it can do something you need/want to do and can't already? If the answer is to be able to get the latest Windows Security patches, why not get MacOS or Linux?

 

The learning curve is near completion, it's not a straight line into infinity.

 

Lynn

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I don't have much sympathy for Microsoft's low sales. They should have listened to their customers who only want to run their existing software.
Unfortunately, this is also their archille's heel and it also prevents Microsoft from new technology and advancing the operating system like it should. Following your example we would still be back using 4bit applications. This is also why 64bit Windows has never taken off. This is why Windows will NEVER be cutting edge.
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Perhaps all the na sayers should go back to DOS using the command line. :lol::lol::lol: I've used most of MS's Operating Systems over the years and will they are not perfect, VISTA was only a slight disappointment for me. The video drivers were a huge failure. Performance in basic mode is about on par with XP but Aero mode requires a bit more juice. MS needs to develop a decent code optimizer. Intel on the over hand needs to improve its instruction set. So, life goes on.

 

 

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Perhaps all the na sayers should go back to DOS using the command line. :lol::lol::lol: I've used most of MS's Operating Systems over the years and will they are not perfect, VISTA was only a slight disappointment for me. The video drivers were a huge failure. Performance in basic mode is about on par with XP but Aero mode requires a bit more juice. MS needs to develop a decent code optimizer. Intel on the over hand needs to improve its instruction set. So, life goes on.

I have to say that my EVGA 8600 has averaged an update almost every 6 weeks. However, it was put out while Vista was going out. Nvidia was ahead of the game with Vista and I am sure now that ATI has caught up nicely.

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Intel on the over hand needs to improve its instruction set. So, life goes on.

 

 

Just a pity Captain Zilog never developed the Z80 for 16 bit and later 32 and 64 - it beat the Intel 8 bit chip hands down :lol:

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Perhaps all the na sayers should go back to DOS using the command line. :lol::lol::lol:

 

It's not the home na sayers like me that affect Microsoft's sales. I've got Vista on my new computer and other than the updates that MS keeps issuing that muck up the system, I've no complaints. But I bought an 'off the shelf' computer that came with Vista and contained Vista compatable software.

 

Microsoft's problem is with big business that won't make the switch to Vista.

 

As to the programs that don't work on Vista..... Easy Media Creator 7 is one example. I haven't tried installing the software from my XP computer onto the new one. It's not worth the effort to find out which ones don't work. I just use the other computer when I need to use the software.

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I guess I'm one of those users that suggest not having that many problems with Vista. However, I don't have any old harware that caused problems either. And as for the learning curve, Anyone that has operated XP for a year or so shouldbn't have that much problem using Vista efficiently. I can remember when Windows first came out and after having used DOS for so long I swore I would never change to this new "Windows". But it didn't take long before I was up and running with windows and wouldn't go back now for anything. Same goes for each of the other new versions of Windows.

 

Bottom line---I guess it's a matter of cash. For all those that have the older computers with all the old hardware, and want to be able to do all these new and wonderful things that can be accomplished now with the newest computers (especially considering the new video and digital cameras and other new hardware) you can stay where you are or upgrade.

 

Frank...

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It's only a matter of time. Most businesses depreciate PCs across 24-48 months and they replace them. I would suspect PCs with VISTA installed would be the replacement models. Only application compatibility would then be a sticking point.

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Just a pity Captain Zilog never developed the Z80 for 16 bit and later 32 and 64 - it beat the Intel 8 bit chip hands down :lol:

Hey! I remember that chip! I had an accelerator "board" for my old IBM PC that bumped it up from 4.77MHz to 10 or 12Mhz What a difference!

 

I'm a bit with Lynn on this one. MS is making the OS more of an application suite, than an OS in my mind. It's function (in my mind) is to provide the interface to the hardware, and some basic hardware abstraction and communication interface, but that's part of the hardware abstraction. Support for different users is probably a necessity too. "Aero interface"... I really can't judge, but then, I can't miss what I haven't seen. :rolleyes:

 

So, which do you spend more time with, Windows or your browser, drafting program, drawing program, video editing program, audio editing program, or any other non-OS program? If MS didn't include Windows Media Player, would you miss it? If Windows didn't have optical media writing capabilities, would you miss it?

 

Sorry, it sounds like I'm writing an OP Ed piece, just ranting.

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As someone who has tons of software that won't run on Vista, why would a company want to switch to an O/S that 'breaks' most of the existing software on their computers?

 

I don't have much sympathy for Microsoft's low sales. They should have listened to their customers who only want to run their existing software.

 

Getting the IT departments to install Vista is an expense, but re-training all their employees in the updated or new applications required to run on Vista is a huge expense for most companies.

 

And they quoted a mayor of HICKORY, North Carolina?....I just had to look it up......population around 40,000 people....furniture and fiber optic cable manufacturing....... and even they are only replacing older computers with new ones running Vista.

 

Apparently he couldn't find any CEO's willing to comment on why 99% of their computers aren't running Vista.

 

I had a friend, from Hickory, North Carolina, in my Army Basic Training. :)

 

Edit: I don't have a desire to move up to Vista, either. I have made enough money, using ME and XP, to keep my place on the lake. LOL. That's all I care about, and I have no reason to move up, unless my support services, or clients do.

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I had a friend, from Hickory, North Carolina, in my Army Basic Training. :)

 

Edit: I don't have a desire to move up to Vista, either. I have made enough money, using ME and XP, to keep my place on the lake. LOL. That's all I care about, and I have no reason to move up, unless my support services, or clients do.

Unfortunately, that may eventually happen. Witness the update from EMC 9 to 9.1, no more support for Windows 2000. EMC 10 also requires at least XP. Thus, I'm now dual bootable with XP and 2000. I've kept 2000 simply for ready access to older devices that XP refuses to let me manage my way. It gets in my way. It's an OS, and it should stay out of my way. Again... I'm ranting. My apologies.

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Unfortunately, that may eventually happen. Witness the update from EMC 9 to 9.1, no more support for Windows 2000. EMC 10 also requires at least XP. Thus, I'm now dual bootable with XP and 2000. I've kept 2000 simply for ready access to older devices that XP refuses to let me manage my way. It gets in my way. It's an OS, and it should stay out of my way. Again... I'm ranting. My apologies.

 

No apologies needed. When I upgraded to XP, my high end HP printer did not any longer have the Tool Box, and my high end HP scanner wouldn't work at all. I was ticked off, and ranted on the HP forums. They never did update drivers for either, but I did get by. I got a new printer and new scanner, and XP has been rock solid for me, ever since.

 

The BSOD's that I have run into, have been less than a handful, since 2002, or whenever XP came out. One of the only ones that I have run into, was the other day when I loaded SP3 for XP. Just another thing that I don't need.

 

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Unfortunately, that may eventually happen. Witness the update from EMC 9 to 9.1, no more support for Windows 2000. EMC 10 also requires at least XP. Thus, I'm now dual bootable with XP and 2000. I've kept 2000 simply for ready access to older devices that XP refuses to let me manage my way. It gets in my way. It's an OS, and it should stay out of my way. Again... I'm ranting. My apologies.

I quite agree. It's MY computer, and I want to run it MY way.

 

It's not Microsoft's responsibility to tell me what to do and how to do it.

 

Which is why the Win2K was functional within days, and the WinXP should be back up shortly after a month or so - I'm not sure when I found it wouldn't boot, but the CD-R I made of some scans I used the computer for on March 8th is the last time I used it. Not a high priority. Good computer. I don't care for WinXP tho.

 

Lynn

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I think "Big Dave" said it---"It's Only a Matter of Time". As technology continues to get better with all the new camcorders, digital cameras, TV's, and other hardware like video cards, drives, monitors etc. people will like it and start buying it. And unless they have kept up with all the newest systems that will be compatible with all this new good stuff, it won't be much good. Printers, scanners, routers, and a whole host of other hardware will IMO, only be able to run on these newer systems. Of course I'm looking ahead a bit, but it's coming.

 

However, I really have to agree with Dave that they--(whoever) should stick to making a great operating system and let the free market come up with all the great programs and utilities. But if MS would have done that, they wouldn't be worth $billions !! :) Every new progarm or utility that comes up that's a real gem, MS will either buy it or figure some way to get it in their OS.

 

Frank...

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However, I really have to agree with Dave that they--(whoever) should stick to making a great operating system and let the free market come up with all the great programs and utilities. But if MS would have done that, they wouldn't be worth $billions !! :) Every new progarm or utility that comes up that's a real gem, MS will either buy it or figure some way to get it in their OS.

 

Frank...

Yep... they wouldn't be worth as much. I have a theory that many businesses could actually do well, by saying, "We're making enough now. Let's not grow bigger." But you don't see that much. Capitalism sort of "assumes" continued growth.

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In the I Ching, the last two hexagrams are #63 "Before Completion" and #64 "After Completion".

 

I used to wonder why, but over time I've come to notice that things don't stop at completion but continue toward breaking down for the next cycle.

 

And I think Microsoft has been moving toward "After Completion."

 

Lynn

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