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Mydvd Does Not Support Multi-threads Cpu?


duydaniel

Question

Hi folk.

 

I am using MyDVD from EMC 10 to make a DVD from 2 AVI files.

During the encoding, I notice it only utilizes one single core, the others stay idle.

I am using Vista Home Basic 32 bit and Q6600 4GB Ram

 

P.S. I am aware that EMC 10 utilizes all the cores during media conversion, but not in the case above. Any idea?

Thank you.

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This is a user to user forum. We would only be guessing. Several people have asked similar question. All I can say is that teh applications are multi-threaded. How they utilize multi-core processors, I'm clueless. Personally, I think multi-core is more hype than anything.

 

I also own Adobe Premiere Elements which IS multi-core aware and I see ZERO difference in encoding speed between adobe and Videowave on my Dual Core.

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This is a user to user forum. We would only be guessing. Several people have asked similar question. All I can say is that teh applications are multi-threaded. How they utilize multi-core processors, I'm clueless. Personally, I think multi-core is more hype than anything.

 

I also own Adobe Premiere Elements which IS multi-core aware and I see ZERO difference in encoding speed between adobe and Videowave on my Dual Core.

Dear sir ggrussell

mostly, I open task manager to see how well the application handle multi cores processor.

The more cores the apps can utilize, the less time it is supposed to spend on.

I hope an EMC developer would look into this issue.

 

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No it is not quite that simple…

 

The more thread processes you use will actually slow the application down!

 

It actually depends on where you make the call for them and where you discontinue their use. MS has a 6 page letter out that discusses strategies a programmer should consider to take advantage of multi thread processing, so that it does not slow the application down!

 

Then you either have to proved 2 separate programs to users since a multi thread program will crash on a processor that does not have multi threading. Or you increase complexity of your program, by testing for mt availability before calling, which in turn slows the application down…

 

But are you getting any bang for your buck?

 

Years ago we found that video rendering time was cut in half every time you increased processor speed! – A 1 hour video takes: 8 hours @ 500mhz; 4 hr @ 1gb; 2 hr @ 2gb etc.

 

You will never get those kind of results by multi thread!

 

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mostly, I open task manager to see how well the application handle multi cores processor.

The more cores the apps can utilize, the less time it is supposed to spend on.

Not really that good of an indicator since most users have 50 or more other applications running in the background.

 

The only good use I've seen for multi-core is when running more than one app at a time. You really do get good multi-tasking speed since each app can have it's own core. As Jim points out, having multi-core doesn't necessarily mean that a single application (like video processing) will increase in speed.

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The only good use I've seen for multi-core is when running more than one app at a time.

 

I agree totally.

 

Personally, I like not having to walk away from the computer while video is encoding.

 

It enables me to put my 2 cent in on this forum while MyDVD is doing processing. :)

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