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Saving Audio File


vventurella

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After Editing (using Sound Editor) an Audio recording from an LP, I find I can only save as a .DMSE file.

How can I save as a .wav file?

 

You have to click on File/Export Track/Clip. You will get to a screen where you can name the file and select what type you want to save as.

 

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You have to click on File/Export Track/Clip. You will get to a screen where you can name the file and select what type you want to save as.

 

Thanks! I originally did that, but by-passed it when I received an error saying I had a 747 Mb file and 0 Mb left. I by-passed mostly because I only had 74 minutes of recording before editing with separated clips and discounted the error. If there's no way to convert the edit file to a .wav now, I'll just have to record less than 70 min next time.

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Sounds like you fell foul of the discrepancy between disc sizes as quoted by the makers and the size quoted by the OS

 

Unfortunately, optical discs are sized in base 10 (denary) where 1K = 1,000, 1 MB = 1,000K, etc while the OS uses base 2 (binary) where 1K = 1024, 1 MB = 1024K

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You should be able to make a wav file of any size and save it to your hard drive..What you can't do is fit more than about 78 minutes on a cd.Make sure the destination for exporting the clip is your hard drive.

 

This is from Wikipedia:

"The WAV format is limited to files that are less than 4 GB in size, due to its use of a 32 bit unsigned integer to record the file size header (some programs limit the file size to 2-4 GB).[1] Although this is equivalent to about 6.6 hours of CD-quality audio (44.1 kHz, 16-bit stereo), it is sometimes necessary to go over this limit, especially when higher sampling rates or bit resolutions are required. The W64 format was therefore created for use in Sound Forge. Its 64-bit header allows for much longer recording times. This format can be converted using the libsndfile library. The RF64 format specified by the European Broadcasting Union has also been created to solve this problem."

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