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Roxio 10 Making Data Discs


gmccann

Question

If this is covered in another posting I apologise in advance but I cannot find it.

 

I have very recently upgraded from Roxio 9 to 10. Whwn making data discs I used to use Drag to Disc and this worked just fine. Provided I had not finalised the disc I could edit the contents and remove files added in error or replace them with a later version.

 

Drag to Disc is not in V10 so I am user Creator Classic to copy the files. That is fine but I find that the files become Read Only on the disc and the program will not allow me to change that property and so allow me to delete it from the disc or replace it. I stress that I am aware that after finalisation files cannot be deleted, replaced or moved.

 

Is there any way I can stop the program automatically changing the property on copied files to Read Only?

 

Hope someone can help

 

Graham

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Sounds like Graham has a valid use for packet writing. As Brendon has indicated you can install D2D from V9 by itself.

 

Since D2D is no longer included you need to explore alternate means because D2D will eventually reach an Operating System when it will not install or work!

 

For now you have bought some time but there is a stone wall in your future unless you learn.

 

I know you can learn otherwise you would still be pasting letters and art on layout boards and taking it to the camera.

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It still is not going to be the same because optical media was never designed or intended to be some sort of shinny floppy…

 

Packet Writing tried to be the shinny floppy but the failure rate was probably 1000 to 1 when compared to disc authoring like Classic. There are various reasons for that but when you have lost your data, reasons are little comfort to you…

 

With Session Writing you can "delete" files but you will never recover the space as they are still on the disc. You can only "delete" them in Classic by importing the contents of the disc into your Project and removing ("deleting") them from the Project.

 

Always check that the Read Only setting is not turned on when you burn because once set the disc is done for.

 

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In Creator Classic, when you click on the Burn button, click on the Advanced options button, then uncheck the box to the left of Read Only.

 

 

That box is not checked and I still get Read Only files on the disc. Any other ideas?

 

I am tempted to uninstall v10 and reinstall v9 where I get the very useful Drag to Disc utility which did not give these Read Only and other editing restrictions until the disc was finalised.

 

Graham

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Once you write anything to an optical disc, it is read only - that's the nature of the beast. You can delete - but you can't reclaim the space (unless the disc is RW and you erase it completely).

 

It doesn't work like a magnetic dissk in that respect

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That box is not checked and I still get Read Only files on the disc. Any other ideas?

 

I am tempted to uninstall v10 and reinstall v9 where I get the very useful Drag to Disc utility which did not give these Read Only and other editing restrictions until the disc was finalised.

 

Graham

 

Using any packet writing software, to back up any of your important files, is like playing Russian Roulette. You are going to eventually lose.

 

Daithi has your answer on the Read Only part. You are now getting a little better understanding of optical media.

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Many thanks.

 

Graham

 

 

I have just rceived a response from Roxio to similar questions I posted to the forum. Roxio said that files will always be Read Only when copied to a disc. What a load of garbage when past versions of the program allowed you to establish the disc as a temporary drive on the computer until you were satisfied with the contents before burning and finalising it.

 

Grshsm

 

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I don't know what version of what program you speak of, but ANY data writtn to optical media is ALWAYS Read Only.

 

With a RW disc and packet writing, it can be erased - it can NOT be amended or re-written

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Please consider this, Daithi.

 

 

The test disc is a CDRW formatted in D2D, with a text file on it. It happens to be a list of James Bond movies. You'll note that in Windows Explorer the file shows that the archive bit is set, but NOT the Read-only bit, so Windows does not have it set read-only.

 

post-208-1214956341.jpg

 

I open the file in Notepad, and add a sentence to the end.

 

post-208-1214956544.jpg

 

Now I save the file, and voila! there is the saved file on the disc.

 

post-208-1214956629.jpg

 

You'll see the file has been updated and has different timestamp and filesize. When opened in Notepad it shows that extra sentence I added.

 

 

 

Now, is this not very much akin to what happens when I perform the exact same actions on a floppy or even a hard drive, and just what Graham has been saying?

. . . or did this not actually happen?

 

Regards,

Brendon

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Brendon,

 

Interesting name of your test media. :rolleyes:

 

So, what we don't know by your test is if the actual data was moved to another physical spot on the media. Does anyone have a program that will read out the physical track, record and sector location for optical media?

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I think two things are getting confused together here.

 

CDs (both R and RW) can be formatted the same way as floppy discs and zip discs - as Brendon has (not so gently) pointed out to me. None of the 3 is particulary more dependable, but since floppy discs only hold 1.44 MB of data, the chances they will be re-written until the TOC [Table of Contents] area is worn out are much lower.

 

Sessions burning is read-only, altho you can delete something from the TOC so it can't be found - and if a different Version of something is added, it will appear as if re-written - but the space will not be restored.

 

However, Flash drives can be changed like floppy discs and Hard Drives, and can go a long time before they've exhausted the ability to be re-written.

 

So perhaps OP can continue to use Packet-Writing for the time being, or switch to a Flash Drive (or something yet to become commonly available) by the time Packet-Writing is no longer available.

 

Lynn

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So, what we don't know by your test is if the actual data was moved to another physical spot on the media. Does anyone have a program that will read out the physical track, record and sector location for optical media?

 

Dave:

 

We don't know whether the file would overwrite the original or not if it was saved on a HD, do we? Does it matter?

I suspect on rewriteable optical media that D2D might write the new copy and then delete the old one so that one part of the disc doesn't get hammered while the rest is unused - well, it would make sense that way - but I don't know.

 

What is established is that Windows Explorer flags the file as read/writeable, that you can save the amended copy, and it behaves in all respects as if the RW disc were a floppy or even a hard drive volume.

 

Although not shown in those pics, deleted filespace is returned to the available pool for re-use. I can make another series to show that if anyone is still skeptical.

 

 

 

 

Lyn:

Your confusion is understandable, but not relevant.

 

 

 

 

Brendon

 

p.s.

 

 

'kay, here's the very same disc after I added a big 450 MB AVI, and then deleted it. It's in drive Y: and 529MB is the empty 650MB disc, same capacity as when it was first formatted.

 

post-208-1214963735.jpg

 

Brendon

 

 

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Sounds like Graham has a valid use for packet writing. As Brendon has indicated you can install D2D from V9 by itself.

 

Since D2D is no longer included you need to explore alternate means because D2D will eventually reach an Operating System when it will not install or work!

 

For now you have bought some time but there is a stone wall in your future unless you learn.

 

I know you can learn otherwise you would still be pasting letters and art on layout boards and taking it to the camera.

 

 

 

Many thanks.

 

Graham

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The topic is open until the original poster has finished.

 

Brendon

 

 

Since I was the original poster I am happy to close the item.

 

Thanks to Brendon I can now copy files onto a disc using Roxio Drag to Disc and remove them using Internet Explorer as the CD Drive is now another drive on the computer and none of the files are read only when written.

 

What is of concern is the number of posters who seem to believe that a file is always Read Only when written to a CD.

 

Anyway thank for all the advice.

 

Graham

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I have just rceived a response from Roxio to similar questions I posted to the forum. Roxio said that files will always be Read Only when copied to a disc. What a load of garbage when past versions of the program allowed you to establish the disc as a temporary drive on the computer until you were satisfied with the contents before burning and finalising it.

 

Grshsm

No that is not 100% correct but is a little complex…

 

It has absolutely nothing to do with type of MEDIA but is controlled by the method it is WRITTEN with.

 

All Authored Files, data disc with Classic/Nero/XP/Vista/etc. are Read Only. They always have been and always will be!!! However if Sessions are used it is possible to "overwrite" and to "delete" files as well as add new files.

 

Files written with a packet writer can be both!

 

They are Writable but only when a writing program is active and the disc is in a Burner that is capable of writing to that media! A disc that is formatted as xxxUDFRW or xxxUDFR, (writable), will magically become, UDFRDR, (Read Only) if the writing software isn't running or you put it into a drive that cannot Burn it!

 

Since no Packet Writer is included in EMC10, I suppose Supports answer is partly correct, but certainly incomplete!

 

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Using any packet writing software, to back up any of your important files, is like playing Russian Roulette. You are going to eventually lose.

 

Daithi has your answer on the Read Only part. You are now getting a little better understanding of optical media.

 

 

Thanks but I am only using the data discs as a medium to pass magazine content to a magazine printer, not as a storage device. Have already found out the fallibility of using discs for long term storage.

 

What peeves me is that I could do everything I wanted using the Drag to Disc utility in v9 of the software, now no longer present in v10. Maybe I will throw v10 in the bin and reload v9.

 

Graham

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Thanks but I am only using the data discs as a medium to pass magazine content to a magazine printer, not as a storage device. Have already found out the fallibility of using discs for long term storage.

 

What peeves me is that I could do everything I wanted using the Drag to Disc utility in v9 of the software, now no longer present in v10. Maybe I will throw v10 in the bin and reload v9.

 

Graham

It is my understanding EMC 9 and EMC 10 can co-exist on the same computer.

 

Lynn

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Never said never actually :lol:

 

Vista has its own built in packet s/w - so why buy a cow when you get the milk supplied ;)

 

Looks like a backtrack to me :lol::lol: "Out completely" doesn't mean "a pint of blue-top please".

 

Brendon

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Thanks but I am only using the data discs as a medium to pass magazine content to a magazine printer, not as a storage device. Have already found out the fallibility of using discs for long term storage.

 

What peeves me is that I could do everything I wanted using the Drag to Disc utility in v9 of the software, now no longer present in v10. Maybe I will throw v10 in the bin and reload v9.

 

Graham

 

Again, Daithi answered before I could get back and post. In addition to what I said before, packet writing was invented for lazy people. It really doesn't take any longer to pass on data, with Creator Classic, than it does with packet writing software. This is not a slam on you. It is a slam on the m-o-r-o-n who invented packet writing. He actually dropped in here a year or so, back. He was an educated m-o-r-o-n.

 

You can do everything you want to do, in a safer way, by using Creator Classic.

 

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