Jump to content
  • Who's Online   0 Members, 0 Anonymous, 18 Guests (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

cdanteek

Hd-burn Technology 700mb To 1.4gb

Recommended Posts

HD-BURN Features SANYO Electric Co., Ltd. has developed a high-density writing technology, "HD-BURN", which has allowed conventional CD-R media (700MB) to doubles the writing capacity (1.4GB). "HD-BURN" will be subsequently adopted into our Super Combination Drives. In addition, SANYO has formulated the standard of the writing format and started the product licensing

 

CD-R media remarkably became widespread because of its reasonable price and the superior compatibility. On the other hand, the needs for large volume of data writing, such as video writing have grown. For large volume of data writing, DVD media (4.7GB) will become widespread as well. In addition, users demand the media, which have intermediate range of the capacity between CD-R and DVD since there is a large capacity difference between these 2 media. Besides these capacity variation demands, users also demand usability and affordability. "HD-BURN" technology meets these needs and realizes large volume data writing at a moderate price.

 

A written disc by "HD-BURN" technology is compatible with a DVD player, and allows the player to read the disc with some modification of firmware. SANYO Electric Co., Ltd. will disclose the technology used to read the media written with "HD-BURN" technology by a DVD player, and will propose to other DVD drive manufacturers that they adopt this technology as an industry standard.

 

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Benefits of the HD-BURN technology to users

 

Double capacity

The high-density writing technology, "HD-BURN" allows a conventional CD-R media to write twice as much as its own capacity. This drive is ideal for large volume data storage such as video data.

High speed writing and reading

"HD-BURN" mode allows 36X (CD-ROM) writing speed and 80X (CD-ROM) reading speed at the maximum by using CLV (Constant Linear Velocity) format.

BURN-Proof prevents writing errors caused by Buffer Under Run errors

Support for CD-RW media

CD-RW media support by HD-BURN will be realized by modified firmware in the future. CD-RW media support by HD-BURN enables 24X data writing speed at the maximum for commercial CD-RW media.

Applications software

Available applications software for writing are B's GOLD by B.H.A and Nero by AHEAD. Users can easily use HD-BURN writing technology since these applications have DVD video writing feature and Video authoring feature.

 

http://www.digital-sanyo.com/BURN-Proof/index.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is that new?

 

DVDinfoPro has been saying whether a CD is "HD-Burn certified" or not for quite some time, and it's rare for the third-party utilities to be in place before the technology is released.

 

It seems a little late to be introducing another writing method which is incompatible with all other current drives and readers, especially when the use and the production of CDs are dying out.

 

With manufacturers busy working on the Blu-Ray vs HD-DVD situation, it is hard enough to persuade them to provide backwards compatability with CDs as it is.

 

Convincing them to provide backwards and sideways compatability to a new version of a dying technology is going to be like pushing water uphill with a rake - especially if they have to pay a licence fee to Sanyo for the "privilege".

 

And what about the existing CD and DVD readers and writers? They would need a Sanyo-licenced firmware upgrade, or else be discarded. I can't see it happening.

 

I think Sanyo have left their run too late. I am slow to change my ways, but even I have joined the millions of others round the world who now save data to DVDs because it's cheaper than using CDs. I would not discard my current gear to buy a new and expensive double-density CD writer or reader when I can store more than 6 times as much on a DVD that reads on any STANDARD drive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is that new?

 

DVDinfoPro has been saying whether a CD is "HD-Burn certified" or not for quite some time, and it's rare for the third-party utilities to be in place before the technology is released.

It seems a little late to be introducing another writing method which is incompatible with all other current drives and readers, especially when the use and the production of CDs are dying out.

 

With manufacturers busy working on the Blu-Ray vs HD-DVD situation, it is hard enough to persuade them to provide backwards compatability with CDs as it is.

 

Convincing them to provide backwards and sideways compatability to a new version of a dying technology is going to be like pushing water uphill with a rake - especially if they have to pay a licence fee to Sanyo for the "privilege".

 

And what about the existing CD and DVD readers and writers? They would need a Sanyo-licenced firmware upgrade, or else be discarded. I can't see it happening.

 

I think Sanyo have left their run too late. I am slow to change my ways, but even I have joined the millions of others round the world who now save data to DVDs because it's cheaper than using CDs. I would not discard my current gear to buy a new and expensive double-density CD writer or reader when I can store more than 6 times as much on a DVD that reads on any STANDARD drive.

 

Go look at these screen shots "third-party utilities to be in place before the technology is released"

released oct 05. Even show blue ray disc's. http://dvd.identifier.cdfreaks.com/

 

cdanteek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Go look at these screen shots "third-party utilities to be in place before the technology is released"

released oct 05. Even show blue ray disc's. http://dvd.identifier.cdfreaks.com/

cdanteek

Sorry, that site and its screenshots don't seem to have anything about Sanyo's HD-Burn technology for CDs - or did I miss seeing something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
especially when the use and the production of CDs are dying out.

What gives you the impression that CDs are dying out? Audio DVD certainly didn't catch on. The ONLY way CDs will die is when the music industry stops making audio CDs and I don't see that happening anytime soon.

 

HD-burn technology may give CD technology new life. I see higher quality audio like suround sound AC3 instead of video use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It seems a little late to be introducing another writing method which is incompatible with all other current drives and readers, especially when the use and the production of CDs are dying out.

 

Eh? Are you citing from some source here? I'd be interested to hear what was said. I sure hope they're not dying out!

 

I think Sanyo have left their run too late. I am slow to change my ways, but even I have joined the millions of others round the world who now save data to DVDs because it's cheaper than using CDs. I would not discard my current gear to buy a new and expensive double-density CD writer or reader when I can store more than 6 times as much on a DVD that reads on any STANDARD drive.

I still put most of my data backups on CD-R. My main system and my laptop both have DVD drives in them, but the other 4 systems in our house don't. I can think of only a couple DVD drives available at work too. So, CD-R is the backup media of choice, regardless of the advantages DVD-R media might have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What gives you the impression that CDs are dying out? Audio DVD certainly didn't catch on. The ONLY way CDs will die is when the music industry stops making audio CDs and I don't see that happening anytime soon.

 

HD-burn technology may give CD technology new life. I see higher quality audio like suround sound AC3 instead of video use.

 

I think Brendon has a point.

 

First, have any of you seen an "extended-density" floppy disch that holds 2.88MB of data? Andy Rathbone, in UPGRADING AND REPAIRING PCs for Dummies says he's never seen one as he mentions they exist. That's the flopy equivilant of the HD-CD.

 

Second, speaking as someone who has been selling a handful of CDs per month on eBay (until the last eBay improvement; I think I'll post again this month since they've promised to rescind it), as well as buying on eBay and elsewhere (Andean music), it seems to me the medium is on it's way out. The buyers are fewer, both online and in CD stores (used CD stores now sell used DVDs, used LPs, used games, T-shirts, CD-carriers, CD-Rs, etc.)

 

Sony's wonderful rootkit probably hastened the demise being caused by poor qualilty music.

 

(Oh - and on eBay, there are a few sellers of the CDs that in the past rcord stores would toss in the trashbin because they weren't selling - and buyers seem to be more willing to try stuff at 1 cent or 8 cents than to buy CDs at half price.)

 

Lynn

Edited by lynn98109

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is that new?

 

DVDinfoPro has been saying whether a CD is "HD-Burn certified" or not for quite some time, and it's rare for the third-party utilities to be in place before the technology is released.

 

It seems a little late to be introducing another writing method which is incompatible with all other current drives and readers, especially when the use and the production of CDs are dying out.

 

No, it is not new. I have (somewhere around here) an OptoRite DD0201, that is at least three years old, that is based on the Sanyo firmware. Although I never felt the need to try to burn a HD disc, the option was there in the pull down speed selection menu (in Nero 6 anway, I don't remember if it was there in any Roxio product. I will have to pop it back in to see). The page linked to was there when I bought the recorder.

Edited by jssilva

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no hard evidence, just a strong feeling.

 

Pressed CDs may be going as strong as ever - I don't know - but all of my disc suppliers (I go through a lot of discs which I buy from a number of different sources) say that sales of burnable CDs are way down, while sales of DVD blanks are soaring. I have heard that a number of manufacturers are preparing to switch from CDs to the newer high density media.

 

My locality (as you might read elsewhere) is far from a teeming metropolis, and this end of the country is more agricultural than most. Things cost a lot more here than in the US. I'd expect our people to hold onto old technology longer than more industrialized places, so if we're showing a swing away from CDs I would expect the trend to be stronger elsewhere.

 

That's my feeling. I could be wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe that's more of indication that people are copying movies more than audio CDs. LOL Audio DVD players never really caught on and you don't find many DVD players in cars although they are options. At the moment, DVDs are mostly used for video. I'm sure that may eventually change if the audio industry starts pushing the audio DVD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maybe that's more of indication that people are copying movies more than audio CDs. LOL Audio DVD players never really caught on and you don't find many DVD players in cars although they are options. At the moment, DVDs are mostly used for video. I'm sure that may eventually change if the audio industry starts pushing the audio DVD.

The question is whether the audio industry is what is going to be shaken up.

 

It hit me last December, when I considered whether to re-list the Christmas CD that had failed to go for 99 cents the 3 times I had listed it the December before on eBay. Starbuck's was giving away free coupons for a download of a Christmas CD at their shops. So insted of seeing if it'd go for 1 cent, I gave it away to someone who doesn't use a computer (her husband does tho).

 

You have a group of young people coming up who download their music - in fact, people of all ages are switching to mp3 players.

 

It's true people still collect older music (including LPs), but by definition older music (especially LPs) are no longer being manufactured.

 

As in musical chairs, the number of players continues to decrease (in this area I'm aware of 1 new usd CD store and at least two others that have ceased, as well as one that was sold).

 

I don't think CDs will disappear soon, but then the LP and the cassette disappeared before I'd expected it, so that dosen't mean anything.

 

Lynn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LPs ??

 

Oh yes, they were a big black double-sided CD sort of a thing, weren't they?

 

I tried playing one in my CD player once, but it seems they weren't backward-compatible or I had the wrong laser, or something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LPs ??

 

Oh yes, they were a big black double-sided CD sort of a thing, weren't they?

 

I tried playing one in my CD player once, but it seems they weren't backward-compatible or I had the wrong laser, or something.

Considering LPs are 12" across, and more than twice as thick as a CD, I qustion that you actually got it into your CD player.

 

Lynn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
by definition older music (especially LPs) are no longer being manufactured.

Not totally.... I've read several places on the net that true audiophiles still kling to the vinyl. They believe that digital is too harsh and doesn't reproduce the warmth of anything analog. The dynamic range of standard CD (16bit 44.1Khz) just can't reproduce all the subtle tones like analog. But then who would want to if you're listening to Jessica Simpson? ROFLOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×