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Understanding how to use 16 by 9


FrankO

Question

MyDVD has no control over the aspect ratio of the video file. Setting widescreen in MyDVD only affects the DVD menu. However in Videowave, that is another story. If you add a 16:9 video file to a Videowave 4:3 production, then it will automatically add the black bars to make it 4:3. To keep the aspect ratio, you need to create a 16:9 Videowave production.

 

Never heard of that product, but glad you found something that works for you.

 

I'm very confused (and realize this post may be too late to stimulate a reply in this thread). I've made a 16:9 PAL .avi file in Premiere Pro. When I use EMC10 to create a DVD I have the option of a 16:9 menu (totally unimportant) but the only ratios offered for the video itself (the whole point of the exercise!) are all 4:3. If I create a DVD with this 16:9 video I can play it in 16:9 only by toggling through all the playback ratios on the TV set. Why can't EMC10 produce a video that plays back right off the bat in 16:9 in the same way as commercial DVDs? Am I missing a setting somewhere?

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I'm very confused (and realize this post may be too late to stimulate a reply in this thread). I've made a 16:9 PAL .avi file in Premiere Pro.
Double check the file create by Premiere Pro.

 

Why, when I select a thumbnail from a 16:9 AVI file for a DVD menu does it compress the frame to to 4:3?

When I use EMC10 to create a DVD I have the option of a 16:9 menu (totally unimportant) but the only ratios offered for the video itself (the whole point of the exercise!) are all 4:3.

I have no idea where you think that option is. There is no such thing in my copy of MyDVD. The 16:9 / 4:3 option in MyDVD Project Settings HAS NOTHING to do with the video. ONLY the menu itself. When you add a video file to a MyDVD project, the aspect ratio of that file is included WITHIN the file. If MyDVD isn't recognizing the video file as 16:9, then there something is wrong with the file.

 

As for the first part of that, I think it depends on the menu style and the button choice which you can easily change. It doesn't matter if the MENU is 16:9 or 4:3, the video thumbnail should still represent the video added. As you can see in my examples, in teh Aquarium menu style, the thumbnail is letterboxed. In the Birthday menu style, it is not.

 

Again - if your thumbnail looks SQUISHED, it would seem that MyDVD is not recognizing the file as 16:9 at all.

post-49-1216680622.jpg

post-49-1216680627.jpg

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Double check the file create by Premiere Pro.

 

I have no idea where you think that option is. There is no such thing in my copy of MyDVD. The 16:9 / 4:3 option in MyDVD Project Settings HAS NOTHING to do with the video. ONLY the menu itself. When you add a video file to a MyDVD project, the aspect ratio of that file is included WITHIN the file. If MyDVD isn't recognizing the video file as 16:9, then there something is wrong with the file.

 

As for the first part of that, I think it depends on the menu style and the button choice which you can easily change. It doesn't matter if the MENU is 16:9 or 4:3, the video thumbnail should still represent the video added. As you can see in my examples, in teh Aquarium menu style, the thumbnail is letterboxed. In the Birthday menu style, it is not.

 

Again - if your thumbnail looks SQUISHED, it would seem that MyDVD is not recognizing the file as 16:9 at all.

 

sknis, ggrussel:

Gentlemen, thank you very much for your helpful and patient responses. Indeed the trick is to load my avi file into Videowave then everything, including the thumbnail works as widescreen when brought into MyDVD. In my ignorance I assumed that a video already edited in one package should be ready for import to a DVD burning package without needing to go through yet another video editor (however briefly). But I'm beginning to see the sheer complexities of digital video inevitably mean there are going to be proprietary software steps needed along the way.

 

ggrussell, the confusing option re widescreen for the video vs widescreen for the menus is the selection of pixel ratios offered in the default encoding settings within the project settings window. These are all effectively 4:3. You'll realize I have come to your software from the point of view that 'Easy' as in 'Easy Media Creator' is synonymous with 'intuitive'. I've learned, thanks to your kind help, that I'm wrong. Making an ISO file as a source for multiple copies is literally easy to do, but not the way most computer software handles the job of outputting files to print. EMC seems to have other comparable situations. For example, if I click on the glaringly presented 'Change menu audio' option in the edit window, a button to have no darn audio at all would seem an obvious setting, but in fact one has to jump through quite a few hoops to remove the default sound Roxio has decided we want to hear.

 

I genuinely appreciate what a complex task it is to devise intuitive user interfaces. My apologies for failing to realize that EMC is built round the concept that I should use this one piece of software for all steps of the process.

 

Thanks again

Frank

 

 

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sknis, ggrussel:

Gentlemen, thank you very much for your helpful and patient responses. Indeed the trick is to load my avi file into Videowave then everything, including the thumbnail works as widescreen when brought into MyDVD. In my ignorance I assumed that a video already edited in one package should be ready for import to a DVD burning package without needing to go through yet another video editor (however briefly). But I'm beginning to see the sheer complexities of digital video inevitably mean there are going to be proprietary software steps needed along the way.

 

ggrussell, the confusing option re widescreen for the video vs widescreen for the menus is the selection of pixel ratios offered in the default encoding settings within the project settings window. These are all effectively 4:3. You'll realize I have come to your software from the point of view that 'Easy' as in 'Easy Media Creator' is synonymous with 'intuitive'. I've learned, thanks to your kind help, that I'm wrong. Making an ISO file as a source for multiple copies is literally easy to do, but not the way most computer software handles the job of outputting files to print. EMC seems to have other comparable situations. For example, if I click on the glaringly presented 'Change menu audio' option in the edit window, a button to have no darn audio at all would seem an obvious setting, but in fact one has to jump through quite a few hoops to remove the default sound Roxio has decided we want to hear.

 

I genuinely appreciate what a complex task it is to devise intuitive user interfaces. My apologies for failing to realize that EMC is built round the concept that I should use this one piece of software for all steps of the process.

 

Thanks again

Frank

 

ggrussel as well as most of the posters here are not in any way connected with Sonic/Roxio but are simply users of the software and just try to help each other. So its not in any way "your software" :)

 

To remove the menu audio does not require a "few hoops" simply 2 mouse-clicks. Under DVDMenu simply click "remove Menu Audio"; this is also where you can easily change the menu audio. The best way to create a DVD involves at least 2 EMC 10 programs: Videowave to assemble and edit you video and myDVD to author and burn the DVD. If you video has been edited in Videowave there is no further editing required in myDVD.

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ggrussel as well as most of the posters here are not in any way connected with Sonic/Roxio but are simply users of the software and just try to help each other. So its not in any way "your software" :)

 

To remove the menu audio does not require a "few hoops" simply 2 mouse-clicks. Under DVDMenu simply click "remove Menu Audio"; this is also where you can easily change the menu audio. The best way to create a DVD involves at least 2 EMC 10 programs: Videowave to assemble and edit you video and myDVD to author and burn the DVD. If you video has been edited in Videowave there is no further editing required in myDVD.

 

 

All points taken. Thank you for the great advice you provide to those of us who struggle!

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You'll realize I have come to your software from the point of view that 'Easy' as in 'Easy Media Creator' is synonymous with 'intuitive'.
I can partially agree, but what may be intuitive FOR ME, may not be for you. So that is very subjective term and really may be determined by one's own level of computer exerience and/or previous experience with video editing in general.
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I'm very confused (and realize this post may be too late to stimulate a reply in this thread). I've made a 16:9 PAL .avi file in Premiere Pro. When I use EMC10 to create a DVD I have the option of a 16:9 menu (totally unimportant) but the only ratios offered for the video itself (the whole point of the exercise!) are all 4:3. If I create a DVD with this 16:9 video I can play it in 16:9 only by toggling through all the playback ratios on the TV set. Why can't EMC10 produce a video that plays back right off the bat in 16:9 in the same way as commercial DVDs? Am I missing a setting somewhere?

 

Yet another question. Why, when I select a thumbnail from a 16:9 AVI file for a DVD menu does it compress the frame to to 4:3? The automatically selected first frame of the movie was displayed as a 16:9 thumbnail, the menu is set to a 16:9 aspect ratio, so why should it change when I select a different frame for the thumbnail?! I'm beginning to see why many users of this software end up suggesting it is not up to the job.

 

Yet another question. Why, when I select a thumbnail from a 16:9 AVI file for a DVD menu does it compress the frame to to 4:3? The automatically selected first frame of the movie was displayed as a 16:9 thumbnail, the menu is set to a 16:9 aspect ratio, so why should it change when I select a different frame for the thumbnail?! I'm beginning to see why many users of this software end up suggesting it is not up to the job.

 

And finally: why is there no option to burn multiple copies when I get to the stage of burning the DVD?? Surely this should be about the most elementary function to offer in a DVD burner? Up to now I've made only single copies and never noticed the omission.

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I'm very confused (and realize this post may be too late to stimulate a reply in this thread). I've made a 16:9 PAL .avi file in Premiere Pro. When I use EMC10 to create a DVD I have the option of a 16:9 menu (totally unimportant) but the only ratios offered for the video itself (the whole point of the exercise!) are all 4:3. If I create a DVD with this 16:9 video I can play it in 16:9 only by toggling through all the playback ratios on the TV set. Why can't EMC10 produce a video that plays back right off the bat in 16:9 in the same way as commercial DVDs? Am I missing a setting somewhere?

 

The issue was the format of the original AVI file that the OP was discussing. Your problem is different.

 

Did you make the video in 16 by 9? Why didn't you just use Video Wave; you can select 16 by 9 there. You are trying to use an application (My DVD) designed to edit menus to try to edit a video. Won't happen. Use Video Wave. Open it, select new project and then select 16 by 9. Bring in that video you made. If it doesn't shows as wide screen then blame the Premier Pro for not making the wide screen video file correctly.

 

I recently took a wide screen HD mpg2 file, edited it and burner it to wide screen DVD and did not have to play around with the DVD/TV controls to it to play correctly.

 

When you go to burn, create an ISO file rather than burning directly to a DVD. Whenever you want to make a copy, just copy the ISO file using Video Copy and Convert to a new disc. You can make multiple copies at the same time if you have several DVD burners.

 

Why use Premier Pro for part of the project and then switch to Roxio My DVD for the rest. In my opinion, that would be just asking for compatibility issues.

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