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Blue Screen On Xp Shutdown With Dual Burners


heck63

Question

I have a problem that started with the install of EMC 8. When I try to shut down my XP pro computer I get a stop screen(Blue Screen),which includes a memory dump with the following error message:

 

Stop: 0X0000008E (0XC0000005, 0X804ECED9, 0XB182977C, 0X00000000)

 

This started out as a reboot condition when I would shut down XP, so I turned off the automatic restart on error, and recieved this error message. I did not have this problem when using EMC 7.5. I can correct the problem if I unplug the IDE cable of either one of my two burners. I am using a Sony DRU-510a and a Plextor PX-740a. The burners are on seperate IDE cables, and it makes no differance if I make them master or slaveto the other item on the cable. Right now the Sony is connected with a CD-rom to the motherboard, and the Plextor is connected with a 200G Maxtor HD to the motherboard.

 

 

The rest of the computer is configured as follows:

 

Asus P4P800 Deluxe MB

2 Western Digital 80g SATA HD's configured in Raid 0

1 Gig memory

GeForce 6600 AGP

Sony DRU 510a

Plextor PX-740a

IDE-CD-Rom

Windows XP Pro SP2

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Hi Heck63,

Looking at this error it says two things...

1. error 0X0000008E refures to

Read what MSN Tecnical Support say on this issue:

 

Bug Check 0x8E: (0X0000008E) KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED

The KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED bug check has a value of 0x0000008E. This indicates that a kernel-mode program generated an exception which the error handler did not catch.

 

Parameters

The following parameters are displayed on the blue screen.

 

Parameter Description

1 The exception code that was not handled

2 The address at which the exception occurred

3 The trap frame

4 Reserved

Cause

This is a very common bug check. To interpret it, you must identify which exception was generated.

 

Common exception codes include:

 

0x80000002: STATUS_DATATYPE_MISALIGNMENT

An unaligned data reference was encountered.

 

0x80000003: STATUS_BREAKPOINT

A breakpoint or ASSERT was encountered when no kernel debugger was attached to the system.

 

0xC0000005: STATUS_ACCESS_VIOLATION

A memory access violation occurred.

For a complete list of exception codes, see the ntstatus.h file located in the inc directory of the Windows DDK.

 

Resolving the Problem

If you are not equipped to debug this problem, you should use some basic troubleshooting techniques. Make sure you have enough disk space. If a driver is identified in the bug check message, disable the driver or check with the manufacturer for driver updates. Try changing video adapters. Check with your hardware vendor for any BIOS updates. Disable BIOS memory options such as caching or shadowing.

If you plan to debug this problem, you may find it difficult to obtain a stack trace. Parameter 2 (the exception address) should pinpoint the driver or function that caused this problem.

 

If exception code 0x80000003 occurs, this indicates that a hard-coded breakpoint or assertion was hit, but the system was started with the /NODEBUG switch. This problem should rarely occur. If it occurs repeatedly, make sure a kernel debugger is connected and the system is started with the /DEBUG switch.

 

If exception code 0x80000002 occurs, the trap frame will supply additional information.

 

If the specific cause of the exception is unknown, the following should be considered:

 

Hardware incompatibility. First, make sure that any new hardware installed is listed in the Microsoft Windows Catalog.

Faulty device driver or system service. In addition, a faulty device driver or system service might be responsible for this error. Hardware issues, such as BIOS incompatibilities, memory conflicts, and IRQ conflicts can also generate this error.

If a driver is listed by name within the bug check message, disable or remove that driver. Disable or remove any drivers or services that were recently added. If the error occurs during the startup sequence and the system partition is formatted with NTFS file system, you might be able to use Safe Mode to rename or delete the faulty driver. If the driver is used as part of the system startup process in Safe Mode, you need to start the computer by using the Recovery Console to access the file.

 

If the problem is associated with Win32k.sys, the source of the error might be a third-party remote control program. If such software is installed, the service can be removed by starting the system using the Recovery Console and deleting the offending system service file.

 

Check the System Log in Event Viewer for additional error messages that might help pinpoint the device or driver that is causing bug check 0x1E. Disabling memory caching of the BIOS might also resolve the error. You should also run hardware diagnostics, especially the memory scanner, supplied by the system manufacturer. For details on these procedures, see the owner's manual for your computer.

 

The error that generates this message can occur after the first restart during Windows Setup, or after Setup is finished. A possible cause of the error is lack of disk space for installation and system BIOS incompatibilities. For problems during Windows installation that are associated with lack of disk space, reduce the number of files on the target hard disk. Check for and delete any unneeded temporary files, Internet cache files, application backup files, and .chk files containing saved file fragments from disk scans. You can also use another hard disk with more free space for the installation. BIOS problems can be resolved by upgrading the system BIOS version.

 

Or No:2 there is this train of thought to sort this issue out...

 

General Troubleshooting of STOP Messages

If you can’t find a specific reference to your problem, running through the following checklist stands a good chance of resolving the problem for you. This checklist is also usually the best approach to troubleshooting some specific Stop messages, such as 0x0A and 0x50.

 

Examine the “System” and “Application” logs in Event Viewer for other recent errors that might give further clues. To do this, launch EventVwr.msc from a Run box; or open “Administrative Tools” in the Control Panel then launch Event Viewer.

If you’ve recently added new hardware, remove it and retest.

Run hardware diagnostics supplied by the manufacturer.

Make sure device drivers and system BIOS are up-to-date.

However, if you’ve installed new drivers just before the problem appeared, try rolling them back to the older ones.

Open the box and make sure all hardware is correctly installed, well seated, and solidly connected.

Confirm that all of your hardware is on the Hardware Compatibility List. If some of it isn’t, then pay particular attention to the non-HCL hardware in your troubleshooting.

Check for viruses.

Investigate recently added software.

Examine (and try disabling) BIOS memory options such as caching or shadowing.

 

Also try to install Service Pack 2 Again over the system as it is, but make sure you have all your files and wanted folders backed up before trying any of this..

 

My gut feel is that this is a hardware issue, and doing any of the above should give you a lead to try to diagnose this fault...

I wish you luck

 

I have already been through all of the information that you are referring to before I posted my message. I updated my BIOS, and replaced the video card, ran a test on all of my memory, and went through some troubleshooting of removing and reinstalling components. That is how I found out that the problem is with EMC8 and the 2 DVD burners. As I stated in the first post, removing EMC 8, or unplugging either of the DVD burners fixes the stop message. I can though run both burners with EMC 7.5 with no error messages.

 

I have spent the last month checking and rechecking everything in my system and I am very confident that the problem is with EMC 8.

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Hi Heck63,

Looking at this error it says two things...

1. error 0X0000008E refures to

Read what MSN Tecnical Support say on this issue:

 

Bug Check 0x8E: (0X0000008E) KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED

The KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED bug check has a value of 0x0000008E. This indicates that a kernel-mode program generated an exception which the error handler did not catch.

 

Parameters

The following parameters are displayed on the blue screen.

 

Parameter Description

1 The exception code that was not handled

2 The address at which the exception occurred

3 The trap frame

4 Reserved

 

 

Cause

This is a very common bug check. To interpret it, you must identify which exception was generated.

 

Common exception codes include:

 

0x80000002: STATUS_DATATYPE_MISALIGNMENT

An unaligned data reference was encountered.

 

0x80000003: STATUS_BREAKPOINT

A breakpoint or ASSERT was encountered when no kernel debugger was attached to the system.

 

0xC0000005: STATUS_ACCESS_VIOLATION

A memory access violation occurred.

 

 

For a complete list of exception codes, see the ntstatus.h file located in the inc directory of the Windows DDK.

 

Resolving the Problem

If you are not equipped to debug this problem, you should use some basic troubleshooting techniques. Make sure you have enough disk space. If a driver is identified in the bug check message, disable the driver or check with the manufacturer for driver updates. Try changing video adapters. Check with your hardware vendor for any BIOS updates. Disable BIOS memory options such as caching or shadowing.

If you plan to debug this problem, you may find it difficult to obtain a stack trace. Parameter 2 (the exception address) should pinpoint the driver or function that caused this problem.

 

If exception code 0x80000003 occurs, this indicates that a hard-coded breakpoint or assertion was hit, but the system was started with the /NODEBUG switch. This problem should rarely occur. If it occurs repeatedly, make sure a kernel debugger is connected and the system is started with the /DEBUG switch.

 

If exception code 0x80000002 occurs, the trap frame will supply additional information.

 

If the specific cause of the exception is unknown, the following should be considered:

 

Hardware incompatibility. First, make sure that any new hardware installed is listed in the Microsoft Windows Catalog.

Faulty device driver or system service. In addition, a faulty device driver or system service might be responsible for this error. Hardware issues, such as BIOS incompatibilities, memory conflicts, and IRQ conflicts can also generate this error.

If a driver is listed by name within the bug check message, disable or remove that driver. Disable or remove any drivers or services that were recently added. If the error occurs during the startup sequence and the system partition is formatted with NTFS file system, you might be able to use Safe Mode to rename or delete the faulty driver. If the driver is used as part of the system startup process in Safe Mode, you need to start the computer by using the Recovery Console to access the file.

 

If the problem is associated with Win32k.sys, the source of the error might be a third-party remote control program. If such software is installed, the service can be removed by starting the system using the Recovery Console and deleting the offending system service file.

 

Check the System Log in Event Viewer for additional error messages that might help pinpoint the device or driver that is causing bug check 0x1E. Disabling memory caching of the BIOS might also resolve the error. You should also run hardware diagnostics, especially the memory scanner, supplied by the system manufacturer. For details on these procedures, see the owner's manual for your computer.

 

The error that generates this message can occur after the first restart during Windows Setup, or after Setup is finished. A possible cause of the error is lack of disk space for installation and system BIOS incompatibilities. For problems during Windows installation that are associated with lack of disk space, reduce the number of files on the target hard disk. Check for and delete any unneeded temporary files, Internet cache files, application backup files, and .chk files containing saved file fragments from disk scans. You can also use another hard disk with more free space for the installation. BIOS problems can be resolved by upgrading the system BIOS version.

 

Or No:2 there is this train of thought to sort this issue out...

 

General Troubleshooting of STOP Messages

If you can’t find a specific reference to your problem, running through the following checklist stands a good chance of resolving the problem for you. This checklist is also usually the best approach to troubleshooting some specific Stop messages, such as 0x0A and 0x50.

 

Examine the “System” and “Application” logs in Event Viewer for other recent errors that might give further clues. To do this, launch EventVwr.msc from a Run box; or open “Administrative Tools” in the Control Panel then launch Event Viewer.

If you’ve recently added new hardware, remove it and retest.

Run hardware diagnostics supplied by the manufacturer.

Make sure device drivers and system BIOS are up-to-date.

However, if you’ve installed new drivers just before the problem appeared, try rolling them back to the older ones.

Open the box and make sure all hardware is correctly installed, well seated, and solidly connected.

Confirm that all of your hardware is on the Hardware Compatibility List. If some of it isn’t, then pay particular attention to the non-HCL hardware in your troubleshooting.

Check for viruses.

Investigate recently added software.

Examine (and try disabling) BIOS memory options such as caching or shadowing.

 

Also try to install Service Pack 2 Again over the system as it is, but make sure you have all your files and wanted folders backed up before trying any of this..

 

My gut feel is that this is a hardware issue, and doing any of the above should give you a lead to try to diagnose this fault...

I wish you luck

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