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Dvd+rw's


SquirrelPMole
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I am new to a MAC. Until now I have been using Roxio Drag to Disc or some form of Easy Creator. I have had external hard drives as my first back up and then used DVD+RW's as my second back up. (Before that I used CD+RW's as my second back up.)Due to the way I organize my files I found this the best solution, in that I could keep adding files to these discs. It did require that I format them and I always used the long format so that they could be read on other machines using Roxio software.

 

Okay..so now I bought a MAC. It is a Mac Pro Desktop and with it I bought TWO super drives which seem to be capable of reading and writing to all kinds of media (not bluray) including DVD+RW's. However, unless I am missing something there is no support on he MAC itself or within Leopard that allows this. There is no formatting and I take this is also true when using Toast? I guess I want to know if there is anyway to copy and keep copying to a DVD PLUS RW using Toast.

 

The only work around I have read so far which sounds a bit complicated - is to save to a DVD+RW. Then when you are ready to copy again to that disc - first you copy the contents of the entire DVD back to you hard drive. Place it into the burn folder, add the NEW files you want to copy to that same disc into the burn folder and then copy it all back to the DVD+RW. There may be a step in there where you first have to erase everything on the disc before copying back..but I am not sure of this ..perhaps it will ask..you have already copied this files...etc..etc..? DOES TOAST have any work arounds for a DVD+RW or does it support them in any way?

 

If the answer to this question is NO..then my next question are there any discs or solutions that would allow me to copy more than once to the same disc.

 

Thanks much for your help..very appreciated.

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The Mac OS does not support packet writing to DVDs so Toast doesn't do it.

 

You've mentioned the option of swapping and erasing two DVD+RW (or DVD-RW) discs. A better option, I believe, is to get a 4 GB USB flash/thumb drive and use it the way you used RW discs on a PC. When it gets full copy it to DVD and erase the flash drive to start again.

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The Mac OS does not support packet writing to DVDs so Toast doesn't do it.

 

You've mentioned the option of swapping and erasing two DVD+RW (or DVD-RW) discs. A better option, I believe, is to get a 4 GB USB flash/thumb drive and use it the way you used RW discs on a PC. When it gets full copy it to DVD and erase the flash drive to start again.

 

I apologize if I have not done the quote part correctly. I enjoyed reading your suggestion because I had never heard of this type of a flash drive before. I went to look at prices and I do not think it will be cost effective. I have about 40 categories to work with on going. Now at 30 dollars or so for each..it becomes an expensive option. However, since I have never used one I am not sure how they work.

 

I assume it plugs directly into a USB port? When you do, can you see 'inside' ..I mean what is on the drive itself? Can you create anything like a folder? I ask because if it came in a larger size and I could create folders that might not solved the problem for all 40 categories but I might be able to at least save my Completed PSD files? Would you know about how it works? Also, when you want to copy from them to the DVD do you just put the DVD in and do a copy/paste or is there other way? Thanks again..very much.

Squirrel.

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USB flash drives come in many capacities: 2, 4 and 8 GB are most common but you can get one with 32 GB. It is simply a USB-powered hard drive with no moving parts. You can do anything with it just as you can with your big hard drives. They are ideal for copying data from a work computer to use at home or to copy a presentation to be shown on someone else's computer.

 

I mentioned 4 GB because that's about the size of a single-layer DVD. I just checked Amazon.com and they list some for under $15. Office supply chain stores and electronics chain stores often discount these in their weekly ads.

 

To copy the contents of a flash drive to a DVD, just drag the folders/files to the Toast Data window, insert a blank disc and click the burn button.

 

A more expensive option is to buy a USB-powered portable hard drive. Like a flash drive these don't require plugging in to a power outlet. However, they have a much greater capacity: typically about 250 GB. I see one at Amazon.com for under $100 These, too, are often on sale as office supply and electronics stores. You can create folders and/or partitions any way you want. Naturally they are more bulky than a flash drive but if you need lots of storage space along with convenience this is the way to go.

 

If you do choose to back up to a portable hard drive, Toast has an easy way for you to back that drive to DVD. Toast automatically does disc spanning. For example, if your backup requires five discs Toast handles that process including creating a directory so you can easily find which disc has the file you need.

 

Lastly you could use Internet storage instead of any of this. One example is a .Me account from Apple that, for $99 a year, provides 20 GB of data storage that appears on your desktop as if it is another hard drive. Apple also provides the application Backup that does incremental saves to your "idisc". You won't have to worry about losing data to a defective or damaged disc and your storage is offsite.

 

I also use Apple's Time Machine to make regular backups to an external hard drive. However, that hard drive is on my premises so it could be destroyed in a fire along with my Mac.

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USB flash drives come in many capacities: 2, 4 and 8 GB are most common but you can get one with 32 GB. It is simply a USB-powered hard drive with no moving parts. You can do anything with it just as you can with your big hard drives. They are ideal for copying data from a work computer to use at home or to copy a presentation to be shown on someone else's computer.

 

I mentioned 4 GB because that's about the size of a single-layer DVD. I just checked Amazon.com and they list some for under $15. Office supply chain stores and electronics chain stores often discount these in their weekly ads.

 

To copy the contents of a flash drive to a DVD, just drag the folders/files to the Toast Data window, insert a blank disc and click the burn button.

 

A more expensive option is to buy a USB-powered portable hard drive. Like a flash drive these don't require plugging in to a power outlet. However, they have a much greater capacity: typically about 250 GB. I see one at Amazon.com for under $100 These, too, are often on sale as office supply and electronics stores. You can create folders and/or partitions any way you want. Naturally they are more bulky than a flash drive but if you need lots of storage space along with convenience this is the way to go.

 

If you do choose to back up to a portable hard drive, Toast has an easy way for you to back that drive to DVD. Toast automatically does disc spanning. For example, if your backup requires five discs Toast handles that process including creating a directory so you can easily find which disc has the file you need.

 

Lastly you could use Internet storage instead of any of this. One example is a .Me account from Apple that, for $99 a year, provides 20 GB of data storage that appears on your desktop as if it is another hard drive. Apple also provides the application Backup that does incremental saves to your "idisc". You won't have to worry about losing data to a defective or damaged disc and your storage is offsite.

 

I also use Apple's Time Machine to make regular backups to an external hard drive. However, that hard drive is on my premises so it could be destroyed in a fire along with my Mac.

SUCH WONDERFUL information. I really have to thank you for this so very much. First, I already bought a .me account..and I had not thought about it because the storage capacity seemed so small. However, I am guessing here (not having looked at it at all) that once you remove the 20 gib..you start again fresh..so this would be an alternative...that is not in anyway related to electricity and APPLE is unlikely to go out of business with my data storage. LOL here. So yes..I could then accumulate it on my desktop, and then store it. It is also a much less expensive choice. I will look into this for sure.

The other alternative of a portable USB drive I had not thought about as again I did not even know they make them..but of course they would for laptops and just being able to transport them. I will look into those also.I already bought Toast today but I think I would use it anyhow for burning music and doing copy to copy...if nothing else.

You have been a fantastic help.Thank You.

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