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500,00 Pirated Cds


cdanteek

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http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060404/tc_nm/...sic_piracy_dc_3

Mon Apr 3

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Two men involved in what U.S. authorities called the largest bust of pirated music CDs and computer software in America each pleaded guilty to five criminal counts on Monday, law enforcement officials said.

 

The pair both of Union City, California, pleaded guilty on five piracy-related charges to manufacturing 200,000 illegal CDs, much of it Latin music, said Kevin Ryan, U.S. Attorney for Northern California.

 

The two, along with a third man, were indicted in October on charges of illegally copying music CDs, as well as Symantec Corp. computer security software and Adobe Systems Photoshop.

 

This is "the largest case involving CD manufacturing piracy uncovered in the United States to date," Ryan told a news conference. "The theft associated with this kind of piracy, copyright infringement, is in the hundreds of millions of dollars, I believe, on a yearly basis."

 

He said officials had seized nearly 500,00 pirated CDs and 5,500 stampers used to make the bootleg products. Many of the disks had FBI anti-piracy seals.

 

Each of the five counts against the men -- which include copyright infringement, trademark violations and trafficking in counterfeit labels -- carries a maximum prison sentence of five years. The two will be sentenced at a later date. The third, who did not plead guilty, is due to appear in court in May.

 

Music industry officials say piracy has lead to a steady decline in CD sales in recent years. Overall U.S. music sales fell 0.6 percent to $12.27 billion in 2005, according to the Recording Industry Association of America.

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http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060404/tc_nm/...sic_piracy_dc_3

Mon Apr 3

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Two men involved in what U.S. authorities called the largest bust of pirated music CDs and computer software in America each pleaded guilty to five criminal counts on Monday, law enforcement officials said.

 

The pair both of Union City, California, pleaded guilty on five piracy-related charges to manufacturing 200,000 illegal CDs, much of it Latin music, said Kevin Ryan, U.S. Attorney for Northern California.

 

The two, along with a third man, were indicted in October on charges of illegally copying music CDs, as well as Symantec Corp. computer security software and Adobe Systems Photoshop.

 

This is "the largest case involving CD manufacturing piracy uncovered in the United States to date," Ryan told a news conference. "The theft associated with this kind of piracy, copyright infringement, is in the hundreds of millions of dollars, I believe, on a yearly basis."

 

He said officials had seized nearly 500,00 pirated CDs and 5,500 stampers used to make the bootleg products. Many of the disks had FBI anti-piracy seals.

 

Each of the five counts against the men -- which include copyright infringement, trademark violations and trafficking in counterfeit labels -- carries a maximum prison sentence of five years. The two will be sentenced at a later date. The third, who did not plead guilty, is due to appear in court in May.

 

Music industry officials say piracy has lead to a steady decline in CD sales in recent years. Overall U.S. music sales fell 0.6 percent to $12.27 billion in 2005, according to the Recording Industry Association of America.

 

The facts seem to fly in the face of the allegations:

 

http://www.usatoday.com/life/music/news/20...ales-main_x.htm

Down:

 

• Total album sales, falling from 666.7 million in 2004 to 618.9 million, according to Nielsen SoundScan, a drop of 7.2% after a 1.5% gain over 2003's sales total.

 

• CD sales (95% of total album sales), off even more dramatically, from 651.1 million to 598.9 million (down 8.0%).

 

• Most musical genres, many (soundtracks, classical, metal and R&:) suffering double-digit drops. Latin was the sole exception, rising 12.6%.

 

=============================

 

(1) 500,000 sounds like a lot, but compared to CD sales off by 52,200,000 - a drop in the bucket.

 

(2) if what was seized is "largely Latin" music, and Latin music rose 12.6% (excluding illegal CDs), it doesn't seem that the illegal CDs were relevant to the "drop in sales [of Latin Music]". And I would suspect the illegal CDs were aimed at people who can't afford full price, the same as in places like Ecuador, Peru, and probably Bolivia - I'm limiting my list to places whereof I have some personal knowledge/experience.

 

Statistics record that a major drop-off of CD sales was concurrent with the banning of the original Napster, which had the capacity to impose fees from ONE source. I think the record companies killed the opportunity to keep it under control.

 

There is a Cambodian folk tale about a bird that every time it is killed, two more of it appear. And if those two are killed, then you have four, and so on. It's called "the Freedom bird".

 

Lynn

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